My millipede collection

ColeopteraC

Arachnobaron
Joined
Mar 8, 2020
Messages
411
Maybe I can tell you something about pill millipedes. I am keeping some species of pill millipedes that live in Asia, like Zephronia profuga and Cryxus ovalis.
They are hard to keep. The temperature must be stable at 15~26 degrees,or they will die in several hours.Temperature is the most important key to keep pill millipedes.Of course,humidity is also important.
Have you ever kept beetles? Beetles eat wet decayed wood litter, that`s what pill millipedes mainly eat. You can find it in shops that sell beetles.
Except Decayed wood litter,These pills eat mosses, too. These are the only two things they eat (as far as I know). Smaller species prefer decayed leaf litter,and some bigger species prefer mosses.

As for giant pill millipedes like Zoosphaerium neptunus,they are incredible strict about temperature.You must control the temp in 18~24 degrees. Temp can`t be reached above 24 degrees during transportation,too.
If the temp is too high,the gut flora of millipedes will be destroyed ,pill millipedes depend on them to digest food. If these bacteria die,pill millipedes will die even if they eat something in your house......Things like this will happen to every pill millipedes after a long journey.
And the main problem is: We don’t even know what bacteria are in their organs to help these millepedes digest......
Of course,there are some giant pill millipedes survived successfully, they will eat some special mosses, decayed leaves and some unknown kinds of fungus. I don't suggest you to try your luck like this because many pill millipedes species are near to extinction because of the unrestricted pet trade, include many beautiful species in Southeast Asia and Madagascar.
So,please don`t try to keep giant pill millipedes, Let them live and breed in nature.
If you really want to keep a pill millipedes, please choose some smaller,more common species, they can tolerate higher temperatures up to 26 or 27 degrees,and they don`t eat unknown things, just decayed wood litter. Air conditioners are always needed, there are no pill millipedes that can live until they breed in a temp of 28 degrees or higher.
Thank you.
I was curious as to how she looked after them for I had heard of the incredibly specific care requirements highlighted in your post. I had dismissed the prospect of keeping them, especially now after the information imparted in your post.
 

JBUSN1990

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
4
I seldom go online, and I am sorry for the possible disrespect.
First, you need a box. Length, width should exceed 30cm and height should exceed 20cm.
Second,buy some dry decayed wood litter and mix them with clean water in a ratio of 2: 3 (In terms of quality, 2 parts of wood litter and 3 parts of water).Put some humus and leaves in it ( if you don`t have humus it`s OK)and put the mixture in the box.
Then, prepare a semiconductor heat sink (I don`t know if it should be said like this in English, it is a kind of heat sink using semiconductor to dissipate heat, usually used to cool computers and mobile phones. You can buy it online and I`m sure that you will know how to use it) ,you can adjust the proper temperature by placing a cloth under this heat sink,or it might be too cold for millipedes to live. Control the temperature !!!!! Buy some moss and plant them on the surface, and then you can put pill millipedes into the box. If the surface has dried, spray water in time. Wet the surface is enough,there must be no standing water. Use a temperature and humidity meter with a probe to provide a suitable environment for millipedes. Less disturbing, no need to feed other things.
These are all you need to keep pill millipedes (I mean smaller species that can be kept in house)


I was curious as to how she looked after them for I had heard of the incredibly specific care requirements highlighted in your post. I had dismissed the prospect of keeping them, especially now after the information imparted in your post.
 
Last edited:

JBUSN1990

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 7, 2020
Messages
4
You must always pay attention to the temperature and humidity meter, which is time-consuming. In fact, You don't need to "look after" them because always disturbing them will threaten these timid creatures. When you spray water, it is better not to let too much water splash on these pills. Water may block their spiracles, which will make them unable to breathe. They don't like light, and are mainly active at night. You may not see them once even you look into the box ten times a day in daytime.......They will dig shallow holes, hide in their own holes or under leaves. If the surface is completely dry, they will dig a deeper and stronger holes and fall into sleep until they feel “a heavy rain” .
All in all, this is a bit of heavy work, at least far more difficult than taking care of common millipedes.
I was curious as to how she looked after them for I had heard of the incredibly specific care requirements highlighted in your post. I had dismissed the prospect of keeping them, especially now after the information imparted in your post.
 
Last edited:

connieisdead

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 18, 2020
Messages
37
Those C. splendidus are absolutely stunning, I will have to keep a look out for some of those :)
 

Marika

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
666
Juvenile male S. argus dragging a leaf into his lair. Hadn't seen him in a long time, he's grown a lot.

DSC09851 – kopio.JPG
DSC09854 – kopio.JPG
DSC09855 – kopio.JPG
DSC09856 – kopio.JPG
DSC09858 – kopio.JPG
DSC09861 – kopio.JPG
DSC09869 – kopio.JPG
 

Marika

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
666
These guys (S. argus) have been very active lately, and I usually see them during the day, which is nice.

DSC00452 – kopio.JPG
DSC00460 – kopio.JPG
 

Arthroverts

Arachnoking
Active Member
Joined
Jul 11, 2016
Messages
2,066
How big are those S. argus? I hear they can hit 10 (25cm), maybe even 12 (30cm) inches in length, which is absolutely insane.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
 

The Odd Pet

Arachnoknight
Arachnosupporter
Joined
May 5, 2019
Messages
160
How big are those S. argus? I hear they can hit 10 (25cm), maybe even 12 (30cm) inches in length, which is absolutely insane.

Thanks,

Arthroverts
I was wondering the same thing. That would be something to see in such a beautifully colored species.
 

Marika

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
666
I'm pretty sure it was plotting something evil with its springtail minions. Like how to take over the world or something.
DSC00521 – kopio.JPG
 

Marika

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
666
My Sechelleptus sp. again (argus? lambertoni? I'm not sure anymore - they were sold as Colossobolus giganteus)
DSC00656 – kopio.JPG
DSC00658 – kopio.JPG
DSC00659 – kopio.JPG
DSC00662 – kopio.JPG
 

Marika

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
666
Beautiful. I am new to owning milipedes. Can you tell me which ones can live with Ivory milipedes?
You can keep many different species with Ivories, for example Anadenobolus monilicornis, Trigoniulus corallinus, Narceus americanus and Narceus gordanus.
 

Leslie1205

Arachnopeon
Joined
Sep 9, 2020
Messages
12
You can keep many different species with Ivories, for example Anadenobolus monilicornis, Trigoniulus corallinus, Narceus americanus and Narceus gordanus.
Thank you. We are new to this and my son was given 2 ivorys as a gift and we knew nothing on how to care for them or anything. Needless to say one died yesterday. My son is devastated. After trying to educate ourselves on the care of milipedes we think it is the substrate which was all coconut fiber leaves and bark. So, I ordered substrate from Josh's frogs it will be here today and I hope we can save the remaining ivory but we are not hopeful. The coconut fiber was just to dry and when I read about how the substrate has to stay moist I immediately sprayed and got it wet everywhere. The little remaining ivory got alert and was walking around. I told my son maybe we aren't meant to have milipedes. He has a turtle and it is the easiest to take care of.
 

Marika

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 7, 2016
Messages
666
Thank you. We are new to this and my son was given 2 ivorys as a gift and we knew nothing on how to care for them or anything. Needless to say one died yesterday. My son is devastated. After trying to educate ourselves on the care of milipedes we think it is the substrate which was all coconut fiber leaves and bark. So, I ordered substrate from Josh's frogs it will be here today and I hope we can save the remaining ivory but we are not hopeful. The coconut fiber was just to dry and when I read about how the substrate has to stay moist I immediately sprayed and got it wet everywhere. The little remaining ivory got alert and was walking around. I told my son maybe we aren't meant to have milipedes. He has a turtle and it is the easiest to take care of.
I'm sorry to hear that, I hope the other one survives. Keeping them too dry is one the most typical beginner mistakes, and also not having a proper substrate (not enough rotten wood and leaves for the millipedes to eat). But now that you are more informed there's a chance the other ivory will make it. We all make mistakes, so don't let it discourage you.
 
Top