Considering getting a P. Metallica.. Thoughts?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Poec54

Arachnoemperor
Joined
Mar 26, 2013
Messages
4,762
True, but I know of one man who is closer to being a senior than a teenager, who was irresponsible and posting his handling of the more dangerous tarantulas on YouTube. And posting that he was subsequently bitten a couple of times by his Poecs.
Not a good example to set by any stretch, but lots of members of this forum have praised him and his videos.

I met my lifetime quota for venomous bites, with a monocled cobra about 30 years ago. That was enough. I do not want to experience an OW tarantula bite.
 

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
If you are looking for a 2nd T then all Poecs are a no-go.

I would recommend looking at :-

B. boehmei
B. vagans
C. cyaneopubescens
T. cyaneolum
T. okteri
L. parahybana
B. cabocla
Hapolopus sp. Colombia

Stick to NW until more experienced
I agree with most of the list, but Hapalopus sp. "Columbia" is one I wouldn't recommend. They're lightning quick, escape artists, and require a more moist environment. They'll be out of their enclosure and up the wall faster than you can blink.
 

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 3, 2016
Messages
124
I agree with most of the list, but Hapalopus sp. "Columbia" is one I wouldn't recommend. They're lightning quick, escape artists, and require a more moist environment. They'll be out of their enclosure and up the wall faster than you can blink.
While I agree it isn't a beginner or wise "2nd T" choice. The OP might want to consider one down the road if OP still wants to keep a pokie in the future, as it would be a good "trainer" before getting a OW aboral like a pokie because of its speed and similar care requirements but much more mild venom.
 

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
While I agree it isn't a beginner or wise "2nd T" choice. The OP might want to consider one down the road if OP still wants to keep a pokie in the future, as it would be a good "trainer" before getting a OW aboral like a pokie because of its speed and similar care requirements but much more mild venom.
Sure, it's a great intermediate species, but not one the OP should consider for her next T. I kept that species when I was just starting, and I was not at all prepared for it. It escaped twice during feeding, and near made it to a crack in the wall when I first got it. It's lightning quick, faster than a GBB.
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
1,899
Probably not a lot of YouTube videos of senior citizens at nursing homes tormenting tarantulas, at least not OW tarantulas.
Most senior citizens don't know what YouTube is much less how to upload their awesome handling videos. :p
 

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 3, 2016
Messages
124
Sure, it's a great intermediate species, but not one the OP should consider for her next T. I kept that species when I was just starting, and I was not at all prepared for it. It escaped twice during feeding, and near made it to a crack in the wall when I first got it. It's lightning quick, faster than a GBB.
Which is why I said not an ideal "2nd T" and a species the OP should consider "down the road" to getting comfortable with fast, defensive Ts
 

Tenevanica

Arachnodemon
Joined
Feb 18, 2015
Messages
727
Which is why I said not an ideal "2nd T" and a species the OP should consider "down the road" to getting comfortable with fast, defensive Ts
I was agreeing with you. :) I was just elaborating on a few of my points.
 

SausageinaNet

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 26, 2015
Messages
33
YO! I keep dangerous animals. My collection is almost all OW. I understand that I may not be part of the norm, due to the fact that I've been around "dangerous" inverts my whole life, and are now getting into keeping them a lot, but generalizing like that.. isn't, perhaps the best? Yeah, I understand what a wet bite from my Haplos or my P. regalis would do, and that's why I plan to never get bit, but if I did, I have a protocol to ensure the least amount of damage happens.
Nobody plans on getting bit. It still happens and there is no 100% safety. Even a GBB is much faster than you can react to it and they aren't that fast considering OW's. Also you don't know if your protocol works or if you have an alergic reaction to the venom. It is easy to plan for a stress situation but executing your plan in such a situation isn't easy because of panic and adrenaline rush. You can hope that you will never find out for yourself but there is always a chance of getting bit. Maybe there is some data out there on bites by poecilotheria or other OW's in their natural habitat which might list children and teens.
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
1,899
Nobody plans on getting bit. It still happens and there is no 100% safety. Even a GBB is much faster than you can react to it and they aren't that fast considering OW's. Also you don't know if your protocol works or if you have an alergic reaction to the venom. It is easy to plan for a stress situation but executing your plan in such a situation isn't easy because of panic and adrenaline rush. You can hope that you will never find out for yourself but there is always a chance of getting bit.
This applies to everyone not just younger people. Age doesn't mean you are in less danger. I was 26 and weighted 120lbs which is a lot less then some teenagers. No one knows if they are going to have an allergic reaction to any venom so age doesn't come into play there. He at least has a plan on what to do if he is bitten. I doubt a lot of people who own tarantulas even have even thought it through much less made a plan. I agree with some of your statements but a lot of them are not dependent on age, they apply to anyone.
Maybe there is some data out there on bites by poecilotheria or other OW's in their natural habitat which might list children and teens.
This is the question and information that should be looked at along with how it effects someone base on weight(not age). Do we have any of that information?
 

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 3, 2016
Messages
124
This applies to everyone not just younger people. Age doesn't mean you are in less danger. I was 26 and weighted 120lbs which is a lot less then some teenagers. No one knows if they are going to have an allergic reaction to any venom so age doesn't come into play there. He at least has a plan on what to do if he is bitten. I doubt a lot of people who own tarantulas even have even thought it through much less made a plan. I agree with some of your statements but a lot of them are not dependent on age, they apply to anyone.

This is the question and information that should be looked at along with how it effects someone base on weight(not age). Do we have any of that information?
Would also have alot to do with volume of venom injected. When I was 17/ 140lbs I got tagged by a P. regalis while transferring from its shipping container to display at the pet store I worked at, had intense pain and stiffness that lasted a few days but never experienced the nausea and labored breathing some describe after pokie invenomations. I suspect I got a smaller hit/dose.
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
1,899
Would also have alot to do with volume of venom injected. When I was 17/ 140lbs I got tagged by a P. regalis while transferring from its shipping container to display at the pet store I worked at, had intense pain and stiffness that lasted a few days but never experienced the nausea and labored breathing some describe after pokie invenomations. I suspect I got a smaller hit/dose.
The amount of venom would be a big factor, IMO. I know with bees (honey bees in specific) different people have very different reactions to the venom. We both could get stung the same amount of times and you swell less then me or the swelling could go down on me faster while you have a large lump/soreness for days longer.

Bite reports are good for a general idea of what to expect when bitten but a lot of other factors could come into play that are not included in the bite reports. One example, what health was the person in before the bite? A person who has a heart condition could be more at risk then a young person. How much venom was injected as mention above? Can we even know from the bite reports? We are quick to think that people that have less of a reaction just got less venom when it could be they just react better to it then others.

These lines of inquiry, I think, are more useful then just trying to use raw age as a determining factor.

All of these statements are speculation on my part. I've not seen any information that would point one way or another in regards to them.
 

Shampain88

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jan 26, 2016
Messages
64
Although I respect the opinions of members here who are vastly more experienced than me I think you should go for it! I've been in the hobby only since January but have amassed a pretty good collection so far and I feel that a GBB for example will teach you nothing about pokies, you need to own one to learn about them.... I actually think that an OBT is a better first T than a Rosie due to the fact it's impossible to kill with poor husbandry and teaches you to have respect for T's... Go for it :)
 

Ceymann

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jul 3, 2016
Messages
124
I agree it's definitely a case by case deal, individuals reactions to envenomations are going to differ.
pokie bite symptoms seem to be very closely related to latrodectism- nausea, profuse sweating, anxiety, muscle cramps/spasms etc etc. While I am not a doctor ( AND THIS SHOULD NOT BE TAKEN AS MEDICAL ADVICE.) I suspect the venom has an effect on the GABA part of our neuro regulation. Therefore, benzodiazepines would make sense to be the drug of choice to manage symptoms. AGAIN JUST SPECULATION, NOT MEDICAL ADVICE!!
 
Last edited:

TownesVanZandt

Arachnoprince
Joined
May 12, 2015
Messages
1,046
I actually think that an OBT is a better first T than a Rosie due to the fact it's impossible to kill with poor husbandry and teaches you to have respect for T's
There are plenty of NW terrestrials who are hardy and easy to care for husbandry wise. To recommend an OBT as a first T isn´t exactly sound advise IMO. Yes, they are incredible hardy, but also prone to bolting and running about at incredible speed when startled. I don´t believe someone with no prior experience with T´s should attempt to rehouse an OBT for example. It might end bad.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top