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User Basin's Tarantulas

Discussion in 'Tarantula Pictures' started by basin79, Aug 26, 2016.

  1. FrDoc

    FrDoc Gen. 1:24-25 Arachnosupporter

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    I can’t decide between my H. maculata and my S. calceatum which is more fun to observe. These are “full package” species, beauty, disposition, webbing, eating, they are tremendously interesting to observe. They are starting to nudge P. murinus out of my top spot as best all around species.
     
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  2. Paparazzi:shifty:
     
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  3. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Thanks to someone on Instagram providing me with the information regarding the differences between a Brachypelma smithi and hamorii she's now been identified. I bought this lass years ago as a juvenile female Brachypelma smithi. Then came the name change so she went to Brachypelma hamorii. Turns out she wasn't a B.smithi in the first place so is now. Aye, crazy. She'll always be my favourite no matter though.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  4. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Brachypelma hamorii.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 14, 2019
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  5. EtienneN

    EtienneN Arachnonovelist-musician-artist Arachnosupporter

    Can I use some of your photos as references for drawing and painting?
     
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  6. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Aye. If you show the pics though please use Basin79.
     
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  7. dangerforceidle

    dangerforceidle Arachnolord Active Member

    Do you have an old moult available still? I'm not so sure she's a B. smithi, but if you have a moult you can check some of the physical features of the spermatheca.

    Check @AphonopelmaTX's post here: https://arachnoboards.com/threads/s...d-kneed-tarantulas.287508/page-2#post-2619024

    But this post by @Exoskeleton Invertebrates seems to indicate she could be B. smithi: https://arachnoboards.com/threads/b...lma-smithi-additional-characteristics.306802/

    Perhaps either of those two could weigh in.
     
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  8. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Possibly although I'd have to look. I was told that Exo had said only B.smithi had the eye spike/hairs.

    My poor head.
     
  9. AphonopelmaTX

    AphonopelmaTX Moderator Staff Member

    Checking the shape of the spermathecal base plates is the only reliable way to distinquish between B. smithi and B. hamorii females if coloration doesn’t make it obvious.

    Post a picture of the dissected spermatheca from a molt in ventral view if you need help or a second opinion. You have to photograph it in ventral view so the uterus externus does not obstruct the view of the baseplates.
     
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  10. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Bloody Nora. So the eye spikes/hairs are enough? Arrrgggghhhh.

    I'll see if I can find a moult of her and soap and water it. If I can I'll need directions please on the above because I'm clueless on things like that.
     
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  11. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Have you got a pic of a confirmed B.hamorri by moult identification WITH the hairs on/over the eyes? That would be the easiest way to show the hairs don't matter.
     
  12. AphonopelmaTX

    AphonopelmaTX Moderator Staff Member

    I don't have a picture, but I took a peek at my B. hamorii and it definitely has long hairs on the ocular mound. The number and length is different from its last molt compared to what it looks like now. I'm not going to take a picture of it and post it here because I do not want to take part in proving or disproving such ludicrous notions. Such images have a tendency to be referred back to and argued over.

    The best way to identify tarantulas is to use published identification keys, when available, which took one or more biologists years of work to sort out. Identification keys exist for Brachypelma hamorii and Brachypelma smithi which is what I used to confirm the species of my B. hamorii linked to previously. If you find the molt of your's then send me a PM and I will help you anyway I can to nail down the ID based on the spermathecal basal plates. Generally speaking, identifying tarantulas to species takes some work and there is no short cuts in getting there.
     
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  13. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Thank you very much. I'll have a look and see if I can find a moult. Surprised that the hairs don't do it as I've seen hamorii without them but you've got first hand evidence of them.
     
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  14. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    First off apologies. I was given the wrong information. The best way to determine if you have a Brachypelma hamorii or smithi is by using a moult and looking at the shape of the spermathecal baseplate.

    Outer differences are the presence of cheliceral bands and long white hairs on the legs of B.hamorri.

    Although I've kept tarantulas for over 20 years I've never bothered to learn "about" them apart from care. I keep tarantulas just because I love big hairy spiders. It's never really appealed to me to sit down and read papers and books.

    This is the thread I made here. There are far more knowledgeable keepers on it that explain better.

    http://arachnoboards.com/threads/we-meet-at-last-brachypelma-smithi.316518/

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  15. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

     
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  16. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

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  17. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Nabbed some pics of this lass. Juvenile Poecilotheria ornata. She seems to spend an equal amount of time on the floor as she does on the sides. Her carapace just floors me.


    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  18. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Juvenile Poecilotheria ornata.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  19. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Grammostola iheringi. This lass hits like a bulldozer. Her eyes seem tiny to me compared to my other tarantulas. She's also the original punk. Look at those red abdomen hairs!!!!!!!!

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  20. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Grammostola iheringi.

    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
     
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