What are the signs of a stressed Tarantula?

ZebraMan

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Nov 26, 2017
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Can my A see man I become cold. Also can someone show me a picture of a stressed A seemanni thanks
 

Arachnophoric

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Can my A see man I become cold. Also can someone show me a picture of a stressed A seemanni thanks
It can if your temperatures drop too low. If you're comfortable with the temperature in your home, so will your A. seemanni. Temps between the high 60s and the low 80s are generally the best temp zones, IME. Higher temps promote a more active metabolism and activity, while lower temps the opposite.

A stressed A. seemanni will look just like any other stressed tarantula; legs drawn in tight to "hide" itself and not moving around, generally camping out in a corner.

Edit - Here is a picture of my 0.1 P. muticus (here you go, @Chris LXXIX :kiss:) the day I got her and stressed from shipping. Notice how she's pulled in tight and hiding her face. Any stressed tarantula will adopt a similar pose.
 
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Vanessa

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Aphonopelma seemanni are a nervous species overall. Mine will most often pull her legs up to cover her carapace when I open the enclosure and I have had her for a long time. Some of them might never get over their nervousness, although many do when they reach full size and have less to worry about.
It can take months for them to get accustomed to their new home and that is why it is always emphasized that they should be rehoused as little as possible.
Your A.seemanni requires fairly deep substrate, a hide, a water dish, with fresh water in it only and nothing else, which should be overflowed a bit to create a bit more humidity.
Leave them alone completely for a couple of weeks and only disturb them to fill the water dish. If they are acting that nervous, put off feeding for a couple of weeks.
Tarantulas do not do a lot. Some of them are a bit more active, and some will rearranging the stuff in their enclosure, but they really don't do much of anything. You'll have to get used to that.
 

CABIV

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Can my A see man I become cold. Also can someone show me a picture of a stressed A seemanni thanks
It's difficult to convey this information via a photo, because as a rule tarantulas don't move a whole lot.

Basically, the only way to know if a tarantula is stressed, is if it is almost always huddled up (instead of relaxed) and is constantly pacing the cage when it is not huddled up. They must display this behavior persistently (over a few weeks).

Unfortunately, a tarantula may act like this for a day or two then go back to normal. It is also hard initially to recognize the difference between typical behaviors for an individual, and unusual ones. This is why observation over time is important, and why no one can give you a clear cut photo and answer.

You really need to have your tarantula for a little while longer. Try and set up you container similar to my description, so it can dig, and then give it somewhere to hide in the meantime. As others mention, put it in a low traffic area.

It will likely take months for it to feel comfortable enough to do "normal" tarantula things. Wait a week before feeding, then just keep up with the food and water.
 

ZebraMan

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Nov 26, 2017
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Thank you. Is my A seemanni in premolt his abdomen turned black
 

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lee1993

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Feb 4, 2020
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my a semmani made burrow all around its enclosure and blocked it off. which been about 5-6 month, not eaten either. i over fill water dish and occasionally i spray have enclosure just give it a little dampness
 

Angelo303

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Sep 23, 2019
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I just got a Costa Rican zebra as my first T it did not want to eat the cricket I gave him. I tried to give him another one but he wouldn’t take it. He is stressed he only stays in a corner and won’t eat. Is this bad?
You spider doesn't very plump at first glance, so pre-molt can probably be ruled out and it might just be stressed form the relocation or it might have molted before you acquired it and not ready to eat yet. It looks fine at fist glance so I wouldn't worry too much unless you see the abdomen really shrink or it keeps staying in a ball o' legs mode.

However there are some changes you should make for the enclosure, to prevent future problems. First, remove the sponge from the water dish, it'll just collect all sorts of dirt, poop(from crickets and T both) and bacteria and can't be cleaned, it's just an infection hazard. Second, the hide looks translucent? While tarantulas don't have good eyesight, they do see light and it might not feel secure in it as a result. Third, while I am not familiar with A. seemanni requirements specifically, the mesh cover to your enclosure might be letting too much humidity escape. But that 3rd point also depends on your ambient humidity and someone more familiar with that species can probably give more accurate info there.

And whoops, just noticed that thread is a wee bit old even if Zebra's question is recent XD
i purchased mine yesterday because it was the smales and i got it because it looks in a bad shape its abdomen is so small i wanted to give it a better place so it looks like this 20200215_183448.jpg 20200217_010225.jpg
and i fed it 1 little dubia roach 2 crickets he ate one and dropped one complete i offered him a 3rd one he grabbed it after a bit he just ripped the head off idk if its alright
 
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