US Native Scorpion Thread

redhourglass

Arachnobaron
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Sep 17, 2002
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Hi all,

This topic is going to be interesting to say the least. I started a habitat thread years back and had some positive feedback too.

I'm definite that the pic is V. crassimanus.

Paruroctonus utahensis, not really sure(?), found in w texas:
 
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redhourglass

Arachnobaron
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Sep 17, 2002
Messages
359
Hey,

From the pictures, the first maybe utahensis or a female of the pale form of boreus and the other is definetly a male of boreus. The last picture is Serradigitus and may be wupatkiensis.
way to go!

These scorps were found in UT.

P. boreus??:

some sort of vaejovis?

Please note, these are only suggestions from my experiences, and only a true scorpion identification can be made through the use of a scope and species description papers,etc. Veteran AB members know the scenario :D
 

campj

Arachnoknight
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Pseudouroctonus apacheanus



Vaejovis vorhiesi



And its habitat





Diplocentrus spitzeri



And its habitat

 

redhourglass

Arachnobaron
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Hi Dave,

http://research.amnh.org/users/lorenzo/PPT/Florida_2008.htm for pictures of Florida Centruroides.

Also, if nobody digs up a good picture of P.gracilior I'll be forced to dig through my hard drive for one of mine. They are definitely in competition as one of my favourite US species. Anyone who has seen one fight a full sized cricket will know why.

Cheers,
Dave
I'll post the pale and larger P. gracilior forms from so. Chihuahua, MX. These guys were large compared to NM (our ATS excursions). Also, the link to Kari's powerpoint for the Durungo, Chihuahua trip for viewers to see.



http://research.amnh.org/users/lorenzo/PPT/Chihuahua_2005.htm

Cheers guys,

Sinc. Chad
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
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I'm definite that the pic is V. crassimanus.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Galapoheros

Paruroctonus utahensis, not really sure(?), found in w texas:


__________________

"In the company of cannibals that sting...and glow"
www.desert-scorpions.com


Awesome pics! Thanks Chad, I got that ID from somebody that usually knows their stuff but the ID didn't really seem to fit, I've always wondered about it. Here's another C. vittatus form, Centruroides vittatus pantheriensis(?) I've read there is no color on pantheriensis but is there absolutely no color around the eyes of pantheriensis?, seems like their would be a gradient there with chisosarius and pantheriensis(?) Somebody was trying to tell me that chisosarius is diff species, not vittatus, confuses me, what's the skinny?


 

redhourglass

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
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Hey,

Time revolves and things change and am not sure where you get your information.

I agree with regarding the gradients and zones but the fact of the matter is that there will be variation within a population despite the above. Population genetics and speciation at its best but Centruroides from the Big Bend TX is C. vittatus (no subspecies status IMO) period untill a peer reviewed molecular and systematic analysis is provided for the whole genus. Baja California has extreme variation and size with C. exilicauda, different through with insular/ peninsular effects in populations in general, but variations in color patterns are noted in the Stan's Baja monograph.

Your first picture is C. sculpturatus. Look at chela dimensions with the other photos.

Awesome pics! Thanks Chad, I got that ID from somebody that usually knows their stuff but the ID didn't really seem to fit, I've always wondered about it. Here's another C. vittatus form, Centruroides vittatus pantheriensis(?) I've read there is no color on pantheriensis but is there absolutely no color around the eyes of pantheriensis?, seems like their would be a gradient there with chisosarius and pantheriensis(?) Somebody was trying to tell me that chisosarius is diff species, not vittatus, confuses me, what's the skinny?
Sinc. Chad
 

Cowin8579

Arachnoknight
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Wow, this thread blows me away. Great job John! haha

It shows how beautiful U.S. species are.
 

redhourglass

Arachnobaron
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Oscar provided the ID in field as P. gracilior. They were in the size of a large adult S. mesaensis. The V. minckleyi (?) were in comparison to Hadrurus or Syntropis. All on my photo section in the signature and or blog.

That's absolutely stunning, Chad. When you say "larger" how big are we talking?

Cheers,
Dave
Sinc. Chad
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Jul 4, 2005
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8,990
Hey,

Time revolves and things change and am not sure where you get your information.

I agree with regarding the gradients and zones but the fact of the matter is that there will be variation within a population despite the above. Population genetics and speciation at its best but Centruroides from the Big Bend TX is C. vittatus (no subspecies status IMO) period untill a peer reviewed molecular and systematic analysis is provided for the whole genus. Baja California has extreme variation and size with C. exilicauda, different through with insular/ peninsular effects in populations in general, but variations in color patterns are noted in the Stan's Baja monograph.

Your first picture is C. sculpturatus. Look at chela dimensions with the other photos.



Sinc. Chad
OK. The one that that looks like sculpturatus is a juvenile I caught from Presidio county tx, so that's prob why the chela dimensions make it look like sculpturatus but it's got to be vittatus, right(?)
 

AzJohn

Arachnoking
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That Anuroctonus pococki is pretty cool looking. I'm loving the info that's going around. I might have to try and get a few some day. I know Dave had some pictures on his slide show but they are one of my favorite species, plus it's the first species I've bred on purpose. PS Were are the D diablo pictures.


C gracilis.
 

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redhourglass

Arachnobaron
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Hey,

I know Presidio County well and no to your question in part...

Sinc. Chad

OK. The one that that looks like sculpturatus is a juvenile I caught from Presidio county tx, so that's prob why the chela dimensions make it look like sculpturatus but it's got to be vittatus, right(?)
 

AzJohn

Arachnoking
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So sculpturatus is in Presidio county? Wow, I did not know that.
LOL I saw a map on one of the linked sites that shows C vitts in my part of Arizona, North Eastern Arizona. There appears to be more overlap between the two species than I would have thought.
 

Widowman10

Arachno WIDOW
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Hey,

From the pictures, the first maybe utahensis or a female of the pale form of boreus and the other is definetly a male of boreus. The last picture is Serradigitus and may be wupatkiensis.



Please note, these are only suggestions from my experiences, and only a true scorpion identification can be made through the use of a scope and species description papers,etc. Veteran AB members know the scenario :D
thank you RHG!! yeah, always kinda wondered.
 

AzJohn

Arachnoking
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Dec 25, 2007
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Just kicking this thing around. Here are some new scorpions found at higher alltitudes, 5000 feet, in central Arizona. Pinon, juniper woodlands. On a vary steep slope.


Any Ideas

John
 

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