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US Native Scorpion Thread

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by AzJohn, Apr 30, 2010.

  1. AzJohn

    AzJohn Arachnoking Old Timer

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    I've seen so many threads with some very nice scorpions. Most of them are all exotic species. While those scorpions are wonderful, lets not forget our own species, found in the US. Lets see some of our own, backyard, scorpions. I'll get started with one of my favorite species.

    Superstitionia donensis, one of the smallest species I own. Adult can be less than 1", babies are crazy small.

    I collected these guys in several places in central Arizona.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Apr 30, 2010
  2. AzJohn

    AzJohn Arachnoking Old Timer

    One more this evening.

    Diplocentrus Peloncillensis. Found in the Peloncillo Mountains in SE Arizona and SW New Mexico.
     

    Attached Files:

  3. Nice scorps John.

    I found this lil guy where i live,west of Atlanta GA,

    Vaejovis carolinianus
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Koh_

    Koh_ Arachnoangel Old Timer

    i wish there was some native scorpions in ontario , canada.
    beautiful scorpions you guys got there.
     
  5. nice bro, Im runnin thru there tomorrow hopefully i can get a quick look and see what i can find
    I personally love the AZ barks Hadrurus Arizonesis striped devils and the dune scorps
    gorgeous critters btw :)
    -Tim
     
  6. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    OK, here are some pics I dug up.

    A diplocentrus whitei male:

    [​IMG]

    Here's a baby whitei:

    [​IMG]

    A female:

    [​IMG]

    Paruroctonus utahensis, not really sure(?), found in w texas:

    [​IMG]

    Centruroides vittatus:

    [​IMG]
     
  7. tarzan2day

    tarzan2day Arachnosquire Old Timer

  8. AzJohn

    AzJohn Arachnoking Old Timer

  9. Widowman10

    Widowman10 Arachno WIDOW Old Timer

    this is an awesome topic!

    way to go!


    i'll play i guess. these scorps were found in UT.

    H. spadix (my favorite scorp if you couldn't guess... :rolleyes:):
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    P. boreus??:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    some sort of vaejovis?:

    [​IMG]

    others:

    H. arizonensis:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    C. sculpturatus:
    [​IMG]
     
  10. sfpearl300z

    sfpearl300z Arachnoknight

    Wow, nice. Really loving the A. diplocentrus whitei and the H. spadix
     
  11. AzJohn

    AzJohn Arachnoking Old Timer

     
  12. Harlock

    Harlock Arachnosquire

    D. lindo with a younger instar in the background cage

    [​IMG]


    V. waurei (I think)

    [​IMG]

    Serradigitus sp. (unidentified)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    V. waurei up top, the Serradigitus under.

    [​IMG]


    I've also got some mesic and xeric vittatus, but I don't feel like bothering them.
     
  13. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

     
  14. Nomadinexile

    Nomadinexile Arachnoking

    Looks like a D. whitei to me, and if the pectine count was right, then it sounds like a positive I.D. to me. There are three TX diplos, D. lindo which are lighter colored, D. diablo which no one has and are also lighter, and the D. whitei. D. whitei are only found in certain parts of the southern 1/3 of Brewster and Presidio counties. Pretty darn rare. That's a nice friend you have in TX!

    The other two U.S. diplos are only found in Extreme S.W. NM and south central and south east AZ.
     
  15. Nomadinexile

    Nomadinexile Arachnoking

    Vaejovis Intermedius
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2010
  16. Nomadinexile

    Nomadinexile Arachnoking

    C. vittatus, 3 mesic females, with 1 xeric male.
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2010
  17. Galapoheros

    Galapoheros ArachnoGod Old Timer

    Nice pic you have there. The guy I got the babies from doesn't really care about scorpions, I could've taken all the babies but I would've felt greedy. He was feeding them hermit crab food lol, I would've saved them! whitei are actually common in their area, more common than "people" are there haha, so not many people there to catch them. I found 12 in one night crawling on the road and saw several at the entrance to their hole while blacklighting, but those backup down their hole before you can get to them. I'm sure enough this is whitei, my only other wonder was if it was something from deeper down in Mexico I haven't seen before since the seller(ZK) has gotten stuff from there through people he knows, but yeah, it's unlikely it came out of Mex. He just couldn't remember where he got it.
     
  18. What

    What Arachnoprince

    Anuroctonus pococki

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Smeringurus mesaensis

    [​IMG]

    smaller more orange individual
    [​IMG]

    Only really decent pics of native stuff I have, that I can remember atm...
     
  19. Nomadinexile

    Nomadinexile Arachnoking

    D. whitei are much more common and inhabit a large range in Mx. Unless it came from baha (hehe), or way south, it's most likely a D. whitei. Next time get me a few huh? :D
     
  20. skinheaddave

    skinheaddave SkorpionSkin Arachnosupporter

    [​IMG]
    Pseudouroctonus reddelli.

    [​IMG]
    Vaejovis vorhiesi -- from the right spot but always subject to revision, of course.

    [​IMG]
    Hadrurus arizonensis

    [​IMG]
    Centruroides hentzi

    [​IMG]
    Centruroides sculpturatus

    [​IMG]
    Centruroides vittatus, Vaejovis coahuilae

    http://research.amnh.org/users/lorenzo/PPT/Florida_2008.htm for pictures of Florida Centruroides.

    Also, if nobody digs up a good picture of P.gracilior I'll be forced to dig through my hard drive for one of mine. They are definitely in competition as one of my favourite US species. Anyone who has seen one fight a full sized cricket will know why.

    Cheers,
    Dave
     
    Last edited: Apr 30, 2010
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