Is this a Birdeater for sure ?

Deb60

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I adopted a new addiction on Thursday and was told by the previous owner that it was a Purple Bloom T , my understanding is that it must be a Pamphobeteus Platyomma? Anyway he said to me that he didn't know the Latin name but was sure it wasn't a birdeater , not that I'm worried if it is. My question is are their any other Ts that could be mistaken for this due to their colour or the name ?
 

Moonohol

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"Birdeater" is a general term that, in addition to being misleading, also does not apply to one specific tarantula. Tarantulas commonly referred to as birdeaters include genus Theraphosa, Lasiodora, Pamphobeteus, Phormictopus, Xenesthis, and others. I'd shy away from using the term at all, if I were you, as tarantulas really don't eat birds (though some technically can). If you post some photos we may be able to give you an idea of what species you're dealing with.
 

Deb60

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"Birdeater" is a general term that, in addition to being misleading, also does not apply to one specific tarantula. Tarantulas commonly referred to as birdeaters include genus Theraphosa, Lasiodora, Pamphobeteus, Phormictopus, Xenesthis, and others. I'd shy away from using the term at all, if I were you, as tarantulas really don't eat birds (though some technically can). If you post some photos we may be able to give you an idea of what species you're dealing with.
At the moment the T is hiding away so don't wish to upset him / her will post one when their out and about .
 

Rittdk01

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I only consider theraphosa "birdeaters" . The name supposedly came from someone seeing a T blondi eating a bird. I can see why people applied it to other tarantulas though. Who wouldn't want a "birdeater"?
 

Vezon

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Technically the word Avicularia means 'bird-eater' so all of those cute little furry things are bird eaters. Honestly, most of those big ground dwelling South American genera (Pampho, Phormic, Theraphosa, Xen) can be called bird eaters.
 

kevinlowl

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It could turn out to be an Amazon Goliath Maneater. Get some pics up and good luck with the ID.
 

Deb60

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"Birdeater" is a general term that, in addition to being misleading, also does not apply to one specific tarantula. Tarantulas commonly referred to as birdeaters include genus Theraphosa, Lasiodora, Pamphobeteus, Phormictopus, Xenesthis, and others. I'd shy away from using the term at all, if I were you, as tarantulas really don't eat birds (though some technically can). If you post some photos we may be able to give you an idea of what species you're dealing with.
It's funny you say about they don't actually really eat birds because I also keep birds in a aviary and shed, and I've actually had people at work asked if I'd actually tried feeding a bird to my Ts . Not a very nice thought to say the least ! You always get one don't you
 

Andrea82

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If it is a 'purple bloom', and showing its colors, chances are you have a MM Pamphobeteus platyomma.
 

Deb60

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If it is a 'purple bloom', and showing its colors, chances are you have a MM Pamphobeteus platyomma.
I was thinking that , I was told it's colours were better just after its last molt , but looking at pictures of them it didn't look as bright as that , maybe it's a female . I believe it's about three years old . When she / he comes out of hiding I will try and get another look .
 

KezyGLA

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A birdeater could be one of a hundred species.

If it is a Pamph it wont be identified properly by photo.
 

Deb60

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A birdeater could be one of a hundred species.

If it is a Pamph it wont be identified properly by photo.
Oh ok , well I'm just going to bear in Mind that eventually I will need a Six foot long set up . It seemed quite docile as the guy actually held it ( poor thing was in its hide trying to Chile out ) whilst I don't agree in holding Ts , it did give me an idea of its temperament.
 

Leila

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I am dying for you to post a photo!!! :)
 

GreyPsyche

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There's a thread on the boards in which a guy claims to have fed his Ts small flightless birds...go figure.

Must have been a birdeater.

I have a lizard eater but I just feed it crickets so I guess it's technically a cricket eater.

Ugh, maybe I'll feed it a cat, cat eater sounds cool.

But I kinda like cats so maybe not I can rally don't know
 

Deb60

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I will do my best , but if I I can't I will get my daughter when she's next over have a look and take a pic .
 

cold blood

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"Birdeater" is a general term that, in addition to being misleading, also does not apply to one specific tarantula. Tarantulas commonly referred to as birdeaters include genus Theraphosa, Lasiodora, Pamphobeteus, Phormictopus, Xenesthis, and others. I'd shy away from using the term at all
Right, its one of those meaningless terms that should just go away...ititerally means a nw terrestrial that gets to or exceeds 5"....that covers hundreds of species...such a worthless term in this hobby.
I was thinking that , I was told it's colours were better just after its last molt , but looking at pictures of them it didn't look as bright as that , maybe it's a female . I believe it's about three years old . When she / he comes out of hiding I will try and get another look .
only mms are bright...immature males can show slight colors on femurs, but generally immature males and females are shades of brown or black depending on where they are in the molt cycle.

Same female pamph pre and post molt.

 

Andrea82

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A birdeater could be one of a hundred species.

If it is a Pamph it wont be identified properly by photo.
Unless its a
Right, its one of those meaningless terms that should just go away...ititerally means a nw terrestrial that gets to or exceeds 5"....that covers hundreds of species...such a worthless term in this hobby.


only mms are bright...immature males can show slight colors on femurs, but generally immature males and females are shades of brown or black depending on where they are in the molt cycle.

Same female pamph pre and post molt.

:eek:
Wow...that is just unbelievable...well, not really, but sjeez, that sure is a difference!
 

Deb60

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Right, its one of those meaningless terms that should just go away...ititerally means a nw terrestrial that gets to or exceeds 5"....that covers hundreds of species...such a worthless term in this hobby.


only mms are bright...immature males can show slight colors on femurs, but generally immature males and females are shades of brown or black depending on where they are in the molt cycle.

Same female pamph pre and post molt.

Looks more like the bottom pic , the carapace shows a wee bit of purple .
 

Deb60

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