I think Tarantulas can be tammed.

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Coaster

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I've read people on here stating that tarantulas don't think or feel emotions and therefore you cannot create a bond with them. They say that if you handle it often and there is a decrease in aggressive tendencies then its just coincidence and they could snap at any moment. Anybody ever wonder why pink toes have pink toes? Well my hypothesis is that its more attractive to females and therefore its a favorable trait to have since it increases the probability of spreading your DNA. Spiders have lots of preferences, and sometimes are more particular when it comes to choosing a mate than some human females. Humans typically underestimate animal intelligence because of lack of evidence, but let me remind you that isn't grounds for conclusion. Like they just realized that elephants can paint pictures, horses can read emotions so well that they can predict answers, turtles will help each other out and flip a fellow right-side up, squirrels will drag a wounded squirrel out from the road. Animals are extremely smart and I think after time even your tarantula will start to become accustomed to you if you treat it right.
 

xhexdx

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What's tammed?

There are so many flaws in your 'logic', I don't even know where to start.

How old are you?
 

clam1991

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and as far as elephants can paint, im sure some one out there will by my dogs mosaic titled "i had something stuck to my butt so i dragged it on the carpet":D
 

Lorum

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1.- They say that if you handle it often and there is a decrease in aggressive tendencies then its just coincidence

2.- Anybody ever wonder why pink toes have pink toes? Well my hypothesis is that its more attractive to females

3.- Spiders have lots of preferences, and sometimes are more particular when it comes to choosing a mate than some human females.

4.- Like they just realized that elephants can paint pictures, horses can read emotions so well that they can predict answers, turtles will help each other out and flip a fellow right-side up, squirrels will drag a wounded squirrel out from the road.
I'm not very good discussing in english, but:

1.- Not a coincidende, but a consequence of stress.

2.- I don't think you have read enough.;) Do you think they can see colors and forms? Has it been proved? No. Also, that hypothesis is, well, particular. Not all species of Avicularia have pinktoes, and not only males do.

3.- That is very subjective. If we try to stay objective, it will be better (when searching the true and making hypothesis). Also, not everything about sexual selection by female choice is known.

4.- That's very cool, but all of those are examples of vertebrate animals, with an entirely different nervous system.

P.S. You can actually create a bond with them... an unidirectional bond. You can play with them, handle them, love them, etc. but if you don't, they won't turn its carapace at you and say: "Why don't you play with me anymore?".
 

Shell

ArachnoVixen AKA Dream Crusher AKA Heartbreaker
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When you have proof of TARANTULA'S painting, or feeling emotion, or tap dancing, then maybe you will be taken seriously.

As already stated, there are SO many flaws in your theory, that I don't even know where to begin. You seem to also be forgetting that all of the animals that you are using to compare them to (elephants, squirrels, turtles etc,) when saying they can be "tammed," have far more complex brains than an invert does.
 

Balkastalkman

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These are all vertebrates. Inverts are really entirely different animals. 2 of these are also mammals and elephants know to be exceptionally smart. All these vids are wonderful but they are all irrelevant. Your comparing tarantulas to elephants, does that make any sense to you?
 

Lorum

Arachnosquire
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Maybe people (in this case, newbies) who think that T's can think, feel, or learn as we do, just keep thinking that because everyone (well, not everyone, but a lot of members of the boards) attacks them.

If you explain the logical reason because we think that tarantulas can't be tamed (or teached) being kind (or at least not saying ironic and humiliating things), and they still think the same, that is OK. But if you just answer with a lot of ironic statements, he/she will probably get upset (angry, maybe) and "defend" his/her point. Don't you think so?

I mean, I would not care if someone laugh at me for my ignorance, but not everyone is the same.
 
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Coaster

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I'm not comparing tarantulas to elephants, I'm saying just like turtles and squirrels animals can do things that are surprising. Most people think tarantulas are not smart because they don't exhibit those characteristics. But I bet you wouldn't think an elephant is smart enough to paint until you actually hand it a paintbrush!
 

Draychen

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Coaster, you will find on these forums that the very basics of tarantula keeping can be answered.. as well as some help questions and many here are very helpful indeed! (Some are EXCEPTIONAL!) HOWEVER, you will find, your opinions, studies, experiences and other things should be kept amongst yourself or others who actually study the field. You will quickly be sided by or attacked by a 50/50 split in the forums on nearly everything you say. No side really brings much evidence to the table (aside from experience), and each person will nullify the other with their individual studies and experiences.. because it supports their 'opinion' (as science has yet to prove or disprove).


Simply put: Believe what you wish :) enjoy your little buddy and create close friendships for those who support you.. and listen even to those who don't. One day science will prove one way or another for certain.

I have seen them do too many remarkable things to dismiss the taming statement. And since creating my communities, I cannot help but see the similiarities between vertebrates that you just posted. (Many of my Avicularia will huddle together in clumps.. people will scream 'It's... it's coincidence!' some will clean eachother: people will scream 'It's... it's... coincidence! She's just tasting the other one to eat it!'. Just two examples to show that even if you have proof and pictures, people will ALWAYS disagree on here. I guarantee they'll still be disagreeing many years after science claims it one way or another).
 

clam1991

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Spiral_Stairs

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I didn't even realize there was a debate. I taught my G. pulchripes to sit (she's very good at it).

But seriously, I find it pretty laughable that you think people underestimate tarantulas when clearly you are completely delusional about the brain power of arachnids. Another thing is that you said there is no evidence disproving certain behaviors in tarantulas, but here's some food for thought: We know for the most part why humans feel emotions. Certain chemicals in our brain govern the way we feel. And the fact is, those chemicals do not exist in the brain of a tarantula. As far as being "tamed" or more receptive toward handling, I would say that the people making these preposterous claims are only seeing what they want to see. If I mess with my insanely defensive obt enough it will eventually calm down and "pout" in a corner and will allow me to do prod at it as much as I want with little to no reaction. This doesn't mean it was tamed, it is simply a stress response. And I guarantee that if I left her alone for a couple hours and then tried to pick her up I would get tagged. Which brings me to my next point, there is no evidence that tarantulas have a memory of more than a few seconds. Which is kind of crucial if wanted your pet to learn a new behavior.
 

Lorum

Arachnosquire
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I'm not comparing tarantulas to elephants, I'm saying just like turtles and squirrels animals can do things that are surprising.
Tarantulas can do things that are surprising. And the fact they can't be tamed (I think it is a fact, other people don't) doesn't change that. People here usually love T's, and that doesn't mean we should anthropomorphize them.
 

nhaverland413

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I have seen them do too many remarkable things to dismiss the taming statement. And since creating my communities, I cannot help but see the similiarities between vertebrates that you just posted. (Many of my Avicularia will huddle together in clumps.. people will scream 'It's... it's coincidence!' some will clean eachother: people will scream 'It's... it's... coincidence! She's just tasting the other one to eat it!'. Just two examples to show that even if you have proof and pictures, people will ALWAYS disagree on here. I guarantee they'll still be disagreeing many years after science claims it one way or another).
care to share these photos or perhaps some video?
 

Draychen

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We know for the most part why humans feel emotions. Certain chemicals in our brain govern the way we feel. And the fact is, those chemicals do not exist in the brain of a tarantula. .

And electricity can be created in many ways.. Glass can be made out of many materials. Dyes can also be made in many different ways. Just because it doesn't contain the exact components doesn't mean it wont work in another way. Even we have only limited understanding of the human brain.\

This is just a quick scenario, I know there is a LOT more to this. But this is the VERY basic responses. Point is, in the end, nearly every creature has the same basic response patterns.... but how advanced can any of them really get?

Take for instance the tarantula's brain. When it's leg breaks, the synapses send signals to trigger the body to alert the tarantula to the damage, causing the tarantula's leg to react. The segments contract to assist in ceasing the flow of blood. The tarantula generally removes the leg. If you have never seen a tarantula writhe in pain.. look it up.

Human brain; same scenario. Receptors receive the signals from the brain, triggering a painful response... and I'm not even going to waste my typing here. A blind man can see the similarities.
 
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