Good starter T's

Tropah

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
8
Hello iv'e been researching and watching vids on T's for months and i think its time i got one i was thinking a Smithi or a Chile Flame

Any advice and suggestions
Also if you know any good dealers in UK please let me know
 

Jason B

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 10, 2016
Messages
88
TSS aka The Spider Shop is a UK dealer I've heard good things about but being that I'm in the states you might be better waiting for someone from the UK to chime in. I did notice while checking out there website that TSS does have juvie Smithis available right now.. which are a decent pick because there not super small, but they aren't full grown so you still get to see them grow.. they are a slower growing species though. I will say this looking at TSS website real quick I am quite envious of those prices, lol.
 

Tropah

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
8
TSS aka The Spider Shop is a UK dealer I've heard good things about but being that I'm in the states you might be better waiting for someone from the UK to chime in. I did notice while checking out there website that TSS does have juvie Smithis available right now.. which are a decent pick because there not super small, but they aren't full grown so you still get to see them grow.. they are a slower growing species though. I will say this looking at TSS website real quick I am quite envious of those prices, lol.
Aha thanks for the advice pal
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,028
There are many great choices..and if you look around, there's about 2,348 other threads outlining your question. But here we go again.https://gohopscotch.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/spoon-feed.jpg

Euthalus species, especially the red and yellow are indeed among the best starters. Drawbacks are that slings are teeny tiny, and take a long time to grow. They can be difficult to find and the prices in recent years for them has skyrocketed as their popularity has risen.... They are smaller, but typically docile to the point of being described as exploratory. @viper69 will likely post a few pic of his...they are around on other similar threads.

Brachypelma species are all good choices. But they all grow slow and start out very small as slings. I would suggest one at least 1", by this size, they eat better and grow more consistently. Vagans and albiceps are a little more skittish, but really nice looking and suitable for a beginner...vagans are dirt cheap, albiceps are not. Sabolosum would be another similar one.

vagans
albiceps
sabolosum

Of the red leg species, bohmei is the flickiest, emelia can be the calmest, smithi is in the middle. All look spectacular, all are easy keeps and good choices.

smithi
Albopilosum just may be the best starter Brachy though in terms of temperament...they are also some of the faster growing and better eating Brachys.

A popular one, and for good reason is C. cyaneopubescens (the GBB). Great eaters, faster growth, gorgeous colors, heavy webbers and frequently visible. The downside is that they can be skittish..although they tend to be a pretty easy keep.

My personal favorite beginner species are the next two.

T. cyaneolum. This is IMO the single calmest, best beginner species I have ever come across....not wanderers like Euthlus, but never skittish, never flicky and good eaters as well...medium growth and they are a stunning deep blue with a huge gold mirror patch.
The downside is finding them...they're rarer than they should be given what a great species they are. Their Thrixopelma cousins are not nearly as calm and most tend to be overly skittish...but not cyaneolum.

G. pulchipes is another of the best of the best. Better growth rates when small, supreme eaters, very active and they get the large...females can get to the 7" range....but they typically are very docile and they are really nice looking...a very enjoyable t to own and a great one to raise from a sling...readily available and cheap, there's no reason every collection doesn't have at least one.

Another good one that's dwarf, is P. scrofa...actually similar to the Euthlus in many ways...although they are much more aggressive eaters. Really nice t and a great option if you have your heart set on the Euthlus and can't find one.

Other good ones are Aphonopelma species, specifically anax, hentzi and chalcodes. They are all great beginner species.

On the larger side, LPs can be good as they are cheap as dirt, grow exceptionally fast and are top notch eaters...a little boring looking, but not bad looking by any means...people love them...they can get into the 8" range (although you will see claims of much bigger...lol).

Some will suggest rose hairs, and they aren't terrible, just slow to learn from and more frustrating as a result, so I don't suggest them...I started there and its a big regret.

All of these ts share certain things in common...they are all hardy and easy to keep...none require much moisture aside from a water dish and all will have long lives as females. The only real difference in keeping these species is the size of their enclosures. A few despise moisture, like scrofa and GBB, the rest are flexible to a degree, but do fine kept dry.
 

Tropah

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
8
There are many great choices..and if you look around, there's about 2,348 other threads outlining your question. But here we go again.https://gohopscotch.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/spoon-feed.jpg

Euthalus species, especially the red and yellow are indeed among the best starters. Drawbacks are that slings are teeny tiny, and take a long time to grow. They can be difficult to find and the prices in recent years for them has skyrocketed as their popularity has risen.... They are smaller, but typically docile to the point of being described as exploratory. @viper69 will likely post a few pic of his...they are around on other similar threads.

Brachypelma species are all good choices. But they all grow slow and start out very small as slings. I would suggest one at least 1", by this size, they eat better and grow more consistently. Vagans and albiceps are a little more skittish, but really nice looking and suitable for a beginner...vagans are dirt cheap, albiceps are not. Sabolosum would be another similar one.

vagans
albiceps
sabolosum

Of the red leg species, bohmei is the flickiest, emelia can be the calmest, smithi is in the middle. All look spectacular, all are easy keeps and good choices.

smithi
Albopilosum just may be the best starter Brachy though in terms of temperament...they are also some of the faster growing and better eating Brachys.

A popular one, and for good reason is C. cyaneopubescens (the GBB). Great eaters, faster growth, gorgeous colors, heavy webbers and frequently visible. The downside is that they can be skittish..although they tend to be a pretty easy keep.

My personal favorite beginner species are the next two.

T. cyaneolum. This is IMO the single calmest, best beginner species I have ever come across....not wanderers like Euthlus, but never skittish, never flicky and good eaters as well...medium growth and they are a stunning deep blue with a huge gold mirror patch.
The downside is finding them...they're rarer than they should be given what a great species they are. Their Thrixopelma cousins are not nearly as calm and most tend to be overly skittish...but not cyaneolum.

G. pulchipes is another of the best of the best. Better growth rates when small, supreme eaters, very active and they get the large...females can get to the 7" range....but they typically are very docile and they are really nice looking...a very enjoyable t to own and a great one to raise from a sling...readily available and cheap, there's no reason every collection doesn't have at least one.

Another good one that's dwarf, is P. scrofa...actually similar to the Euthlus in many ways...although they are much more aggressive eaters. Really nice t and a great option if you have your heart set on the Euthlus and can't find one.

Other good ones are Aphonopelma species, specifically anax, hentzi and chalcodes. They are all great beginner species.

On the larger side, LPs can be good as they are cheap as dirt, grow exceptionally fast and are top notch eaters...a little boring looking, but not bad looking by any means...people love them...they can get into the 8" range (although you will see claims of much bigger...lol).

Some will suggest rose hairs, and they aren't terrible, just slow to learn from and more frustrating as a result, so I don't suggest them...I started there and its a big regret.

All of these ts share certain things in common...they are all hardy and easy to keep...none require much moisture aside from a water dish and all will have long lives as females. The only real difference in keeping these species is the size of their enclosures. A few despise moisture, like scrofa and GBB, the rest are flexible to a degree, but do fine kept dry.
I actually own a C. cyaneopubescens and i think its amazing its my first one i just want a couple more aha
 

Tropah

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
8
There are many great choices..and if you look around, there's about 2,348 other threads outlining your question. But here we go again.https://gohopscotch.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/05/spoon-feed.jpg

Euthalus species, especially the red and yellow are indeed among the best starters. Drawbacks are that slings are teeny tiny, and take a long time to grow. They can be difficult to find and the prices in recent years for them has skyrocketed as their popularity has risen.... They are smaller, but typically docile to the point of being described as exploratory. @viper69 will likely post a few pic of his...they are around on other similar threads.

Brachypelma species are all good choices. But they all grow slow and start out very small as slings. I would suggest one at least 1", by this size, they eat better and grow more consistently. Vagans and albiceps are a little more skittish, but really nice looking and suitable for a beginner...vagans are dirt cheap, albiceps are not. Sabolosum would be another similar one.

vagans
albiceps
sabolosum

Of the red leg species, bohmei is the flickiest, emelia can be the calmest, smithi is in the middle. All look spectacular, all are easy keeps and good choices.

smithi
Albopilosum just may be the best starter Brachy though in terms of temperament...they are also some of the faster growing and better eating Brachys.

A popular one, and for good reason is C. cyaneopubescens (the GBB). Great eaters, faster growth, gorgeous colors, heavy webbers and frequently visible. The downside is that they can be skittish..although they tend to be a pretty easy keep.

My personal favorite beginner species are the next two.

T. cyaneolum. This is IMO the single calmest, best beginner species I have ever come across....not wanderers like Euthlus, but never skittish, never flicky and good eaters as well...medium growth and they are a stunning deep blue with a huge gold mirror patch.
The downside is finding them...they're rarer than they should be given what a great species they are. Their Thrixopelma cousins are not nearly as calm and most tend to be overly skittish...but not cyaneolum.

G. pulchipes is another of the best of the best. Better growth rates when small, supreme eaters, very active and they get the large...females can get to the 7" range....but they typically are very docile and they are really nice looking...a very enjoyable t to own and a great one to raise from a sling...readily available and cheap, there's no reason every collection doesn't have at least one.

Another good one that's dwarf, is P. scrofa...actually similar to the Euthlus in many ways...although they are much more aggressive eaters. Really nice t and a great option if you have your heart set on the Euthlus and can't find one.

Other good ones are Aphonopelma species, specifically anax, hentzi and chalcodes. They are all great beginner species.

On the larger side, LPs can be good as they are cheap as dirt, grow exceptionally fast and are top notch eaters...a little boring looking, but not bad looking by any means...people love them...they can get into the 8" range (although you will see claims of much bigger...lol).

Some will suggest rose hairs, and they aren't terrible, just slow to learn from and more frustrating as a result, so I don't suggest them...I started there and its a big regret.

All of these ts share certain things in common...they are all hardy and easy to keep...none require much moisture aside from a water dish and all will have long lives as females. The only real difference in keeping these species is the size of their enclosures. A few despise moisture, like scrofa and GBB, the rest are flexible to a degree, but do fine kept dry.
my brother keeps it in his room so i barely see it but when i do it ooks amazing
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 8, 2006
Messages
12,373
there quite cute to say the least aha
They are one of the most unique Ts I've ever owned, those and N. incei.

E. sp. Yellow which may or may not be the same species as the Reds, I have one, also excellent for the same reasons.
 

Tropah

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
8
They are one of the most unique Ts I've ever owned, those and N. incei.

E. sp. Yellow which may or may not be the same species as the Reds, I have one, also excellent for the same reasons.
yeah the paternson the N. incei. abdomen is amazing
 

Tropah

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
8

GreyPsyche

Arachnosquire
Joined
Jun 19, 2016
Messages
92
GBB sling.

They're amazing beginner species only downside is they're somewhat skittish.
 

cold blood

Moderator
Staff member
Joined
Jan 19, 2014
Messages
12,028
yeah and they look good and will do good take downs right?
Its more of a blitzing ambush type attack...almost like you would see with a true spider...where it feels the prey on the web and charges out after it...they are really fast, probably one of the faster NW terrestrials out there, so they usually get their prey.

They like things a little damper, and as adults, they can disappear for times....males can also mature in under a year....if you ever get these, get them as slings as small as possible and as cheap as possible and buy several.
 

Tropah

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 30, 2017
Messages
8
Its more of a blitzing ambush type attack...almost like you would see with a true spider...where it feels the prey on the web and charges out after it...they are really fast, probably one of the faster NW terrestrials out there, so they usually get their prey.

They like things a little damper, and as adults, they can disappear for times....males can also mature in under a year....if you ever get these, get them as slings as small as possible and as cheap as possible and buy several.[ QUOTE]
yeah it'd be amazing to pick a couple up i'd also want to get a darlingi
 

Haemus

Arachnosquire
Joined
Feb 11, 2016
Messages
128
The A. genic was my latest addition after my GBB and I'd recommend it. Beautiful, bulky T with impressive appetite and growth:
 

Andrea82

Arachnoemperor
Active Member
Joined
Jan 12, 2016
Messages
3,652
Another vote for A.geniculata here.
C.darlingi is an awesome species to keep, but imo not as a second T. They are an Old World species, meaning they have much more potent venom, they are defensive and can be quite fast. It could be a first/second OW, but not a second T, imo.
 
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