Breeding N. incei colour forms.

Arachnomaniac19

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Is it acceptable to breed the normal form with the gold form? I'm assuming that the gold form is recessive.
 

Trenor

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Is it acceptable to breed the normal form with the gold form? I'm assuming that the gold form is recessive.
They are the same species no issues breeding them. The gold trait is recessive. There's been a few posts lately about the results of breeding if I can find them I'll post a link.
 

cold blood

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YES!

As trenor said, theyre the same species. When i bred incei, i paired 2 olives, and because they both happened to carry the recessive gene, i got 25% gold slings from thst sac. I certainly didnt pair 2 olives and create a new species from it...lol.
 

Trenor

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These produce colors not based on locals but on traits. Like my blue eyes are not a result of where I am from but what traits my parents had.

You don't just find golds only in one local you find them mixed in with the olives.

With some other species a group in a specific locale can had a slight variant that doesn't show up in a group from another locale. Most people that have access to these typically don't breed between them either.
 

Arachnophoric

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These produce colors not based on locals but on traits. Like my blue eyes are not a result of where I am from but what traits my parents had.

You don't just find golds only in one local you find them mixed in with the olives.

With some other species a group in a specific locale can had a slight variant that doesn't show up in a group from another locale. Most people that have access to these typically don't breed between them either.
Isn't there an issue with this with P. murinus, where different "color forms" are being bred together but in actuality they are different locales?
 

Venom1080

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it is def frowned upon to breed different localities in the tarantula hobby.
 

Arachnomaniac19

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These produce colors not based on locals but on traits. Like my blue eyes are not a result of where I am from but what traits my parents had.

You don't just find golds only in one local you find them mixed in with the olives.

With some other species a group in a specific locale can had a slight variant that doesn't show up in a group from another locale. Most people that have access to these typically don't breed between them either.
I know. I'm saying people don't mix locales because it muddies up the genetics espcially since we don't know what genes are co-dom and what not.
 

Trenor

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I know. I'm saying people don't mix locales because it muddies up the genetics espcially since we don't know what genes are co-dom and what not.
Right, I was just pointing out with these it doesn't matter cause there isn't a local that only has gold and another with only olives. As far as I have ever heard both colors exist in all groups.

Not like the shade on this T is slightly lighter or darker in this locale than this other locale so mixing the two locales might mute the differences.
 

Jeff23

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N. incei come from Trinidad and both color forms come from any location where this tarantula can be found there if I understand correct. There is only one other species in this genus, N. fasciaaurinigra, which comes from Villavicencio, Colombia (all of this assuming this genus does not have errors on it).

It is really interesting on the olive versus gold though since more than color can be viewed as differences on them. Mine seem to be slightly different on personality based on this color as well.

I occasionally have olive forms come flying out of the burrow hole. Otherwise they are too shy to come up while I am present. I never have this activity with gold form. My gold form love to come up right next to surface and put multiple legs up out of the burrow to grab the cricket kind like my Psalmopoeus cambridgei. But the twist is that Psalmopoeus cambridgei looks more similar to the olive form.

EDIT* Technically my Psalms have more of a dirt curtain than a burrow.
 

Trenor

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My golds seem to grow faster than the olives but other than that I'm not noticed anything vastly different between the two habit wise.

It's odd because it seems like the two golds are both females and and at least two of the olives are male. (based on size and how leggy/bulky they are)

As far as color patterns goes the gold's rings on the abdomen are more muted because of the weaker pigment but are still visible in the right light.

You can see them as lighter yellow:

But they really pop on the olives:
 

Jeff23

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My golds seem to grow faster than the olives but other than that I'm not noticed anything vastly different between the two habit wise.

It's odd because it seems like the two golds are both females and and at least two of the olives are male. (based on size and how leggy/bulky they are)

As far as color patterns goes the gold's rings on the abdomen are more muted because of the weaker pigment but are still visible in the right light.

You can see them as lighter yellow:

But they really pop on the olives:
I wish I could see enough of mine to even guess on sex. All of their molts stay down in the substrate. I am about to up-size the enclosures for my golds. They are all definitely bigger than my olives. In fact it caught me by surprise when I figured out how to check for size. I can monitor their overall size somewhat by using my red flashlight late at night on the deli cup to see their outline. I have to get lucky when they come up top on the substrate for a while to do this
 
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Trenor

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Yeah, I was able to get a good look when I rehouse them but I often see mine on top when they are eating. I drop the food in the enclosure late evening and they often web while eating unless I make to much noise/vibration then they dive for the holes.
 

cold blood

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Isn't there an issue with this with P. murinus, where different "color forms" are being bred together but in actuality they are different locales?
those are indeed local variants...and some day may have their seperate species....those should not be bred with other variants.

Incei is totally differrent as explained. There are no local variants, theyre found on the island of trinidad.
 

Arachnomaniac19

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those are indeed local variants...and some day may have their seperate species....those should not be bred with other variants.

Incei is totally differrent as explained. There are no local variants, theyre found on the island of trinidad.
I know, read what I said above.

The dart frog locales, at least some, are the same species. In fact, some used to be classified as different species (Dendrobates tinctorius "azureus" comes to mind), but are now one species. Colour really isn't a proper way to distinguish a species.
 

JoshDM020

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I know, read what I said above.

The dart frog locales, at least some, are the same species. In fact, some used to be classified as different species (Dendrobates tinctorius "azureus" comes to mind), but are now one species. Colour really isn't a proper way to distinguish a species.
The point of what everyone is saying is: you can breed two olives and get a gold. The very first gold came from two olives. They are the same species. Scientifically studied and proven. One is just a different color. Much like humans. Tan people are just as human as albinos.
 

Arachnomaniac19

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The point of what everyone is saying is: you can breed two olives and get a gold. The very first gold came from two olives. They are the same species. Scientifically studied and proven. One is just a different color. Much like humans. Tan people are just as human as albinos.
I know. What I didn't know was if it was acceptable to breed them since in other species it isn't.
 

JoshDM020

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I know. What I didn't know was if it was acceptable to breed them since in other species it isn't.
I think the difference here is it isnt a "color form" caused by a different location. Its just a weird glitch in the genetics of this particular species. It wouldn't effect breeding in any negative aspect.
 

Arachnomaniac19

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I think the difference here is it isnt a "color form" caused by a different location. Its just a weird glitch in the genetics of this particular species. It wouldn't effect breeding in any negative aspect.
I know. But the cause of it is the same. Lots of people in other hobbies are picky about these "mudbloods!"
 
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