Brand new T hobbyist! Introduction/Seeking advice

machinegunkev

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
Hello Everyone!!!

I am a brand new T hobbyist and proud owner of two species of tarantula. Yesterday I picked up both a Grammostola rosea, and a Avicularia Avicularia!

Both of which were bought from a non-big-chain-petshop, that buys their T's from a breeder. Both are very young, the rosea is about 4-4.5 inches in leg span, and the Avic is about 3-3.5 inches leg span. Both very docile and friendly :). I'm housing them both in their own seperate enclosures, using sterilite containers, with drilled holes for ventilation. For substrate, I am using Reptisoil by Zoo Med. I've purchased small-medium crickets as they are fairly young and are no where near being mature.

The rosea has a half-log hide, and a deli-cup(rocks in the deli cup) in its enclosure. The height of the enclosure is 7 inches, at its lowest point, the substrate is about 3 inches high from the top of the enclosure.

The avic I have a vertical 11" inches in height and 8" in length and width, has a delicup(also with rocks),some faux leaves hanging down, and log in the middle.

I haven't attempted to feed them yet. I will give them a week before I try and offer them food. The pet shop keeper fed them on Saturday and he said they took the food.

The Rosea has been in its hide for the past 24 hours, which i think is normal? Not sure.

The Avic has been climbing up and down its enclosure.

Still no webbing from either!

I was wondering if these living conditions will be ok. Me being a beginner I have no confidence in what I've produced for these specimens lol. So if you have any advice what so ever, please feel free to leave me a comment!!! Thank you!!

Attached are some photos of the enclosures, and a photo of my Rosea since it's currently in it's hide :)
 

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Cassiusstein

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
102
Hello Everyone!!!

I am a brand new T hobbyist and proud owner of two species of tarantula. Yesterday I picked up both a Grammostola rosea, and a Avicularia Avicularia!

Both of which were bought from a non-big-chain-petshop, that buys their T's from a breeder. Both are very young, the rosea is about 4-4.5 inches in leg span, and the Avic is about 3-3.5 inches leg span. Both very docile and friendly :). I'm housing them both in their own seperate enclosures, using sterilite containers, with drilled holes for ventilation. For substrate, I am using Reptisoil by Zoo Med. I've purchased small-medium crickets as they are fairly young and are no where near being mature.

The rosea has a half-log hide, and a deli-cup(rocks in the deli cup) in its enclosure. The height of the enclosure is 7 inches, at its lowest point, the substrate is about 3 inches high from the top of the enclosure.

The avic I have a vertical 11" inches in height and 8" in length and width, has a delicup(also with rocks),some faux leaves hanging down, and log in the middle.

I was wondering if these living conditions will be ok. Me being a beginner I have no confidence in what I've produced for these specimens lol. So if you have any advice what so ever, please feel free to leave me a comment!!! Thank you!!

Attached are some photos of the enclosures, and a photo of my Rosea since it's currently in it's hide :)
Looks like you've done your research, good job! I haven't owned a Rosea, but from what I understand they're an extremely easy species. Only bad thing is long fasts? I could be wrong, someone more familiar with them will help you out on that one. I know my G. Pulchra, and Pulchripes are quite the bulldozers.

As for the Avic, the only thing I can say is a bit more ventilation up top would be good if possible, and keep it nice and dry. Although there's nothing really wrong with the water dishes, the pebbles aren't necessary, your Ts wont drown, and I personally use a more shallow water dish, but like I said it won't really hurt anything.

I definitely felt the same way you do in terms of confidence, but I definitely feel a lot better now since things are going very successfully. Don't worry too much, it would take a serious mistake to end up with one of these two dead. Just ask questions on the board if something worries you. As a new T owner, most of your questions will be answered with "don't worry about it, that's normal". My most important tip- have fun! In all honesty some people here can get you a bit down for your choices or other things, but it's important to do what keeps you happy, and interested in the hobby.

Cheers :D
 

Cassiusstein

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
102
Also, looking back at the pictures, the Avic could benefit from something with a bit more "coverage" if that makes sense. All of mine have taken to corkwood tubes very quickly, and happily.
 

machinegunkev

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
Looks like you've done your research, good job! I haven't owned a Rosea, but from what I understand they're an extremely easy species. Only bad thing is long fasts? I could be wrong, someone more familiar with them will help you out on that one. I know my G. Pulchra, and Pulchripes are quite the bulldozers.

As for the Avic, the only thing I can say is a bit more ventilation up top would be good if possible, and keep it nice and dry. Although there's nothing really wrong with the water dishes, the pebbles aren't necessary, your Ts wont drown, and I personally use a more shallow water dish, but like I said it won't really hurt anything.

I definitely felt the same way you do in terms of confidence, but I definitely feel a lot better now since things are going very successfully. Don't worry too much, it would take a serious mistake to end up with one of these two dead. Just ask questions on the board if something worries you. As a new T owner, most of your questions will be answered with "don't worry about it, that's normal". My most important tip- have fun! In all honesty some people here can get you a bit down for your choices or other things, but it's important to do what keeps you happy, and interested in the hobby.

Cheers :D
Great feedback!! Seriously, I've been worried about this and that, not really sure if I'm doing things right lol. Thank you so much for replying!

So for the Avic, more coverage, and more ventilation. Got it!

So for the Avic I want to keep it dry? I' know I'm not supposed to over do it in terms of humidity. But I've always heard that Avic's liked a little bit of humidity? The soil is dry, I havent "misted" its enclosure at all, but i did choose to limit ventilation on the ceiling area because I wanted to maintain a little bit of humidity. I created ventilation holes on the sides for the cross ventilation and thought that would suffice. So holes on top then?
 

REEFSPIDER

Arachnobaron
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
412
A 4-4.5 inch G.rosea is by no means young. They are typically slow growers and it can take a while for them to reach that size. Welcome to the hobby.
 

Cassiusstein

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
102
Great feedback!! Seriously, I've been worried about this and that, not really sure if I'm doing things right lol. Thank you so much for replying!

So for the Avic, more coverage, and more ventilation. Got it!

So for the Avic I want to keep it dry? I' know I'm not supposed to over do it in terms of humidity. But I've always heard that Avic's liked a little bit of humidity? The soil is dry, I havent "misted" its enclosure at all, but i did choose to limit ventilation on the ceiling area because I wanted to maintain a little bit of humidity. I created ventilation holes on the sides for the cross ventilation and thought that would suffice. So holes on top then?
No problem at all! I only casually overfill my avics water dish to dampen the soil, and add a bit of humidity, but very occasionally. They really don't need a ton of humidity, proper ventilation is far more important. What you have to know is how to troubleshoot your issues, don't go completely off of everything I say, or anyone else on this forum. If your T seems to be having issues, play with temps, humidity, ect. Until you find what works. We all can however guide you in the right direction. All of my Avics eat redily and I dont mist (which in almost all cases you should never do) or regularly bump up humidity.
 

machinegunkev

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
A 4-4.5 inch G.rosea is by no means young. They are typically slow growers and it can take a while for them to reach that size. Welcome to the hobby.
Oh ok! Thanks for the input, I only assumed it was young because the pet shop keeper informed it was less than a year old.
 

Walker253

Arachnobaron
Joined
Jun 12, 2016
Messages
556
As for the Avic, the only thing I can say is a bit more ventilation up top would be good if possible, and keep it nice and dry. Although there's nothing really wrong with the water dishes, the pebbles aren't necessary, your Ts wont drown
I believe the rocks are in the water dish so the crickets don't drown.

Hello Everyone!!!

I am a brand new T hobbyist and proud owner of two species of tarantula. Yesterday I picked up both a Grammostola rosea, and a Avicularia Avicularia!

Both of which were bought from a non-big-chain-petshop, that buys their T's from a breeder. Both are very young, the rosea is about 4-4.5 inches in leg span, and the Avic is about 3-3.5 inches leg span. Both very docile and friendly :). I'm housing them both in their own seperate enclosures, using sterilite containers, with drilled holes for ventilation. For substrate, I am using Reptisoil by Zoo Med. I've purchased small-medium crickets as they are fairly young and are no where near being mature.

The rosea has a half-log hide, and a deli-cup(rocks in the deli cup) in its enclosure. The height of the enclosure is 7 inches, at its lowest point, the substrate is about 3 inches high from the top of the enclosure.

The avic I have a vertical 11" inches in height and 8" in length and width, has a delicup(also with rocks),some faux leaves hanging down, and log in the middle.

I haven't attempted to feed them yet. I will give them a week before I try and offer them food. The pet shop keeper fed them on Saturday and he said they took the food.

The Rosea has been in its hide for the past 24 hours, which i think is normal? Not sure.

The Avic has been climbing up and down its enclosure.

Still no webbing from either!

I was wondering if these living conditions will be ok. Me being a beginner I have no confidence in what I've produced for these specimens lol. So if you have any advice what so ever, please feel free to leave me a comment!!! Thank you!!

Attached are some photos of the enclosures, and a photo of my Rosea since it's currently in it's hide :)
I think you did a good job in prepping and both enclosures looks great.
Your rosea will come out when she ready, they're about as tough and resilient as they come. They both look to be in excellent condition. Welcome and enjoy!
 

REEFSPIDER

Arachnobaron
Joined
May 6, 2016
Messages
412

machinegunkev

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
No problem at all! I only casually overfill my avics water dish to dampen the soil, and add a bit of humidity, but very occasionally. They really don't need a ton of humidity, proper ventilation is far more important. What you have to know is how to troubleshoot your issues, don't go completely off of everything I say, or anyone else on this forum. If your T seems to be having issues, play with temps, humidity, ect. Until you find what works. We all can however guide you in the right direction. All of my Avics eat redily and I dont mist (which in almost all cases you should never do) or regularly bump up humidity.
Oh right! now that you mention it, I did read somewhere that proper ventilation would prevent mold from forming.

So what are some signs that I do not have adequate ventilation?
 

Cassiusstein

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
102
Oh right! now that you mention it, I did read somewhere that proper ventilation would prevent mold from forming.

So what are some signs that I do not have adequate ventilation?
I can't say much for signs of good ventilation, the main thing I look for is how quickly my water dish dries up, if it takes days then there's a good chance the ventilation isn't good enough. However if your T is eating every day, and molting healthy, there's no need to change anything at all
 

machinegunkev

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
I can't say much for signs of good ventilation, the main thing I look for is how quickly my water dish dries up, if it takes days then there's a good chance the ventilation isn't good enough. However if your T is eating every day, and molting healthy, there's no need to change anything at all
Lol ok, you've helped me out quite a bit and i know i'm probably being intrusive lol! So last question.... is there a such thing as TOO MUCH ventilation? Of course I dont mean like, making the entire enclosure look like swiss cheese. But is there a chance of mistakenly over doing it if im deliberately placing ventilation holes?
 

Cassiusstein

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
102
Lol ok, you've helped me out quite a bit and i know i'm probably being intrusive lol! So last question.... is there a such thing as TOO MUCH ventilation? Of course I dont mean like, making the entire enclosure look like swiss cheese. But is there a chance of mistakenly over doing it if im deliberately placing ventilation holes?
No way of being intrusive, a ton of people including myself enjoy helping people who redily want to learn. For avics, eehhhh not really, if those zoomed net enclosures weren't bad for the hooks on their toes, I'm sure a lot of people here would suggest them lol. But you don't have to go overboard, I don't go nuts, I just make sure moisture isn't really trapped in my Avics enclosures. Someone may be able to answer a bit better, as I am fairly new myself.
 

Crone Returns

Arachnoangel
Joined
Mar 22, 2016
Messages
990
Don't scare the man :rofl: although I do agree, a dead T is the most obvious sign somethin ain't right lol
I was tutored by Poec54. Short and ironic. The little guys will suffocate if they don't get cross ventilation. They don't have a thorax and two book lungs like true spiders. They have 4 book lungs. Different method of breathing. They need a good cross ventilation, all around the cage. No mesh lids, Avics climb high and their tarsii get hooked onto the mesh. They live in the trees, and web heavily in the trees. Will post a potato pic of mine tomorrow when the light's better.
 

Cassiusstein

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
102
Not the best pic, but this is how I received my first Avic Avic, from the late great @cold blood (taught me what I know)

IMG_20161212_151707.jpg

Like I said, not the best example, but as you can see, it webbed in the highest point of the enclosure, even making it's own hammock, or tube sort of structure out of webs. If you left the lid on for any long period of time he would even web that up.
 

machinegunkev

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 4, 2017
Messages
1
nice pic !!! hes a beaut :astonished:

so i added some vent holes to the door, which i know will interfere with the viewing of my avic, all good though. it was the easiest way to add ventilation ASAP without disturbing the poor thing...

I'll post pics after they get comfortable and start to web! which hopefully will be soon? lol
 

Cassiusstein

Arachnosquire
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
102
Aww you didn't have to go and do that, asap wasn't quite necessary. Should be webbing in no time! Although you should note, even a feeding T may not want to web for quite some time. One of my avics refused to web until it was about to molt, webbed itself in, and molted. Now that she's done molting, she webs regularly.

Don't forget to tag me in the pics!
 

Ungoliant

Malleus Aranearum
Staff member
Joined
Mar 7, 2012
Messages
3,884
Still no webbing from either!
Grammostola rosea is not a webber, although she may lay some silk down in her retreat, when she is feeding, or right before molting.

Your Avicularia avicularia will eventually create a web retreat (either attached to the anchor points you provided or inside of the cork bark). However, it may be a few weeks before the Avic begins webbing in earnest.

A happy Avic will spend little or no time on the ground, so the substrate is mainly for aesthetics and to hold moisture if additional humidity is needed.


So what are some signs that I do not have adequate ventilation?
  • You have condensation in the enclosure.
  • You are growing mold.
  • Your tarantula isn't doing well.

I keep my Avics in dry, well-ventilated cages (with a water dish in each, of course). I live in a humid climate, so there is plenty of ambient humidity.

If you live in a dry climate, or you are running the heat a lot (that dries the air), you can overflow the water dish a bit to moisten the substrate. This will increase humidity in the enclosure. (Do not let the substrate get sopping wet; if anything, you just want it to be a little damp.) There is no need to "mist" the cage.

It is far more important to make sure there is plenty of cross ventilation (and some top ventilation) to prevent the enclosure from becoming stuffy.

You may have already read this, but if not, don't put heating pads or heat lamps on your cages. If you are comfortable in the room with inside clothing (no coats or layers), the tarantula is fine. If the room is too cold, heat the room, not the cages.
 
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