What is the penetrative force of a large tarantula's fangs?

Moakmeister

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Apparently the funnel-web spider (Hexathelidae) can bite through a fingernail. That's pretty cool, so I started thinking about what the power of a tarantula's fangs could be. Theraphosidae can get almost four times as big as any Hexathelidae, so it would be a pretty huge bite.
 

nicodimus22

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Well, bigger doesn't necessarily mean more penetrating power. It's the amount of pressure per square unit of area, so having huge fangs could mean a larger surface area which would spread the force out more and not be as good at penetrating as something with narrower fangs.
 

Moakmeister

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Well, bigger doesn't necessarily mean more penetrating power. It's the amount of pressure per square unit of area, so having huge fangs could mean a larger surface area which would spread the force out more and not be as good at penetrating as something with narrower fangs.
But it has a lot more weight and muscle behind it, and the fangs come down to basically the same sharp point. Not completely pointed, because if it weren't a little bit rounded at the end, the tip would break off.
 

nicodimus22

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But it has a lot more weight and muscle behind it, and the fangs come down to basically the same sharp point. Not completely pointed, because if it weren't a little bit rounded at the end, the tip would break off.
You'd have to measure the fangs of each very precisely, and the force of each bite to figure it out. I'm not sure there is any data on that, but if there is, someone can share it.
 

EulersK

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I've watched my T. stirmi bite straight through a catch cup, so... a lot. Enough, at least.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Actually a huge (females, just for remain in the 'size matters' league) P.muticus, genus Theraphosa, genus Lasiodora etc are strong enough for damage even hand nerves if they strike in the right part, persist and chew. Enough for me :-s
 

cold blood

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It was one of those heavier deli cups, the ones that hot soup come in.
I often think when I have a larger t in a thin deli cup, if only this t knew.

I would be surprised if many, if not most ts could bite through a fingernail. Roach shells are hard as heck and they crunch through them like they were nothing.
 

EulersK

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I'm also sure it depends on the individual. Surely there are instinctual fail-safes in place to prevent them from harming themselves (breaking a fang, bursting the exoskeleton, etc). Humans are surprisingly strong, but our brains prevent us from using it so we don't snap a tendon. No reason spiders wouldn't have the same thing to prevent a broken fang. Speculation, of course.
 

viper69

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Apparently the funnel-web spider (Hexathelidae) can bite through a fingernail. That's pretty cool, so I started thinking about what the power of a tarantula's fangs could be. Theraphosidae can get almost four times as big as any Hexathelidae, so it would be a pretty huge bite.
Scientists have demonstrated that most Ts can bite through titanium.
 

Blue Jaye

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Don't know if it's true. But I read a few years back that G.rosea/ porteri has the strongest bite of any tarantula. Not venom mind you but bite strength. Hmmmm....
 

Belegnole

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They don't have opposing jaws per se so I would have doubts that it is all that strong. However I have read somewhere that they have bitten through boot leather.
 

cold blood

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i read that they can flatten a car tire. :shifty:Arizona's #1 cause of flat tires is the local Aphonopelma population.

My uncles friends cousin was on the freeway at 75 when a tire blew. His car rolled twice. As he emerged from the car, he watched as a large chalcodes unlatched its fangs from the now flat goodyear and walked away....minutes later the car blew up....speculation is that a second t bit through the gas tank!:wideyed:
 
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