Too fat???

Goodlukwitthat

Arachnoknight
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Mar 10, 2015
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Ignore previous post. The images didn't show when I posted. Definitely premolt so don't offer anymore food unless you want that booty to pop :p
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Dec 25, 2014
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I have a G.rosea sling, + or - that size, even a bit 'fatty'. Incredible he/she is like Slimer when it comes to eat :-s

Nothing to worry... just wait for molt.
 

TownesVanZandt

Arachnoprince
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May 12, 2015
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1,033
Slings don´t get too fat or obese, they will just eat and moult. Your specimen looks like it´s ready to moult soon. That makes handling it even more stupid!
 
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ledzeppelin

Arachnobaron
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Jan 8, 2013
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434
Every now and then the new forum users need to be told what are the 3 big NOs when it comes to posts here. They are as follows: 1. heat mats 2. handling and 3. hybrids. Post in favour of those and you'll most likely get torn apart. ;) And I don't mean this as an assault to anyone. We are here to advise in favour of the animals and sometimes emotions get the best of us. We see mangled and severely injured tarantulas due to bad husbandry and handling much too often here.. Many times we could explain things in a more kindly fashion, but sometimes we need to ensure that the new keepers get the message. I personally am in favour of a kind explanation, because we all know that many Ts are bought in LPSs and the caresheets there are beyond horrible. Sometimes, though, the new keepers get smart with us here. You don't belong in this group of people, but don't get offended if you get yelled at. This is how we learn. :)
 

Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
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Jul 2, 2016
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It can't be too fat, that's not a possibility. The myth of "Ts being fat" probably stems from the fear of a spider injuring itself from a fall, if it's very plump it's more likely to hurt itself. If it's housed properly this is not a risk at all.

Ts can't be obese the same way humans can, it will simply molt and grow. Your G.rosea looks like it's in pre molt, hold off on feeding for now and try to avoid handling if you can, It's not necessary.
 

cold blood

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It can't be too fat, that's not a possibility. The myth of "Ts being fat" probably stems from the fear of a spider injuring itself from a fall, if it's very plump it's more likely to hurt itself. If it's housed properly this is not a risk at all.

Ts can't be obese the same way humans can, it will simply molt and grow. Your G.rosea looks like it's in pre molt, hold off on feeding for now and try to avoid handling if you can, It's not necessary.
Right...a sling cannot ever be too fat...its part of the growth process....a fat sling is a good thing, not a concern.
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
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It can't be too fat, that's not a possibility. The myth of "Ts being fat" probably stems from the fear of a spider injuring itself from a fall, if it's very plump it's more likely to hurt itself. If it's housed properly this is not a risk at all.
Well, juvies and adults certainly can be too fat. Yes, the fall issue can be avoided like you said, but their abdomens get to the point of constantly dragging on the substrate. For species that don't lay down much web, this can lead to drag injuries similar to "road rash" that humans get. Slings don't get this because of how often they're molting, but very slow growing juvies like most Brachypelma spp. can end up with nasty injuries.
 

GreyPsyche

Arachnosquire
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Jun 19, 2016
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Dang, I got a sling for my gf (bigger than yours) not nearly as fat, that's a big booty Judy right there.
 

Nightstalker47

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Well, juvies and adults certainly can be too fat. Yes, the fall issue can be avoided like you said, but their abdomens get to the point of constantly dragging on the substrate. For species that don't lay down much web, this can lead to drag injuries similar to "road rash" that humans get. Slings don't get this because of how often they're molting, but very slow growing juvies like most Brachypelma spp. can end up with nasty injuries.
First I've heard of it, if it were to happen the spider would probably molt shortly thereafter. If anything it would be a temporary issue, not a long term detriment to their health, as obesity is in humans. I've gotten some juvies really fat and I've yet to have any problems, usually they just go into pre molt, but I can see how that would be a hindrance with slow growing species like brachypelma.
 

EulersK

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First I've heard of it, if it were to happen the spider would probably molt shortly thereafter. If anything it would be a temporary issue, not a long term detriment to their health, as obesity is in humans. I've gotten some juvies really fat and I've yet to have any problems, usually they just go into pre molt, but I can see how that would be a hindrance with slow growing species like brachypelma.
http://arachnoboards.com/threads/cyst.283830/

I can see how this would cause molting problems, as it's not just a surface issue. I just wouldn't risk it.
 

Nightstalker47

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http://arachnoboards.com/threads/cyst.283830/

I can see how this would cause molting problems, as it's not just a surface issue. I just wouldn't risk it.
Interesting thread, your B.albopilosum successfully molted and lost the spot, so I think we can assume that the injury wouldn't cause molting problems until proven otherwise... but I see where your coming from, what do you mean by not just a surface issue?
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Interesting thread, your B.albopilosum successfully molted and lost the spot, so I think we can assume that the injury wouldn't cause molting problems until proven otherwise... but I see where your coming from, what do you mean by not just a surface issue?
Well, she still has the dot (she hasn't molted since). It looks more like a scar now rather than a sore, and I expect it to be gone by next molt. On top of that, you can see the dot on the inside of the exuvia meaning that it wasn't just a surface injury. It's happened in the past that a "scab" gets caught during a molt and tears open the abdomen during the molting process. That's my real concern.
 
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