The Speed of the P. cambridgei

Meaningless End

Arachnoknight
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Oct 9, 2006
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252
im not sure where the best forum to put this is so if the mods would like to move it at any time they are more then welcome to.

This is a video showing the speed of the P. cambridgei

i know allot of you are very against handling but i figured that some of the people here could still appreciate the speed that they are capable of


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iUbckLuhkQk
 

LeilaNami

Arachnoking
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Jun 8, 2006
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I've held A. seemani like that. I end up chasing them down across the room {D
 

sammyp

Arachnosquire
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Apr 17, 2006
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Looks like she ran out of breath there ;) They certainly are fast. I have one I dare not handle, as she is still quite small and I have rather long hair... I'd never see her again! :rolleyes:
 

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
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Feb 28, 2007
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I think I read either in a tarantula keeper's guide book or on a post somewhere that running (like in the video) really takes a lot of energy out of the spider..so wouldn't bothering it like this just to make a "fast tarantula clip" really stress it out? Especially since you wasn't trying to rehouse it?
 

ShadowBlade

Planeswalker
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Apr 1, 2006
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I think I read either in a tarantula keeper's guide book or on a post somewhere that running (like in the video) really takes a lot of energy out of the spider..
They have very poor carbon dioxide - oxygen exchange through their booklungs, so it builds up quickly if they run alot.

Yes, handling species like this does stress them out somewhat.. but the way I see it, they're gonna forget about it after a few minutes.


-Sean
 

Meaningless End

Arachnoknight
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Oct 9, 2006
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the way i think about it is everything needs exersise even spiders... i dont have them out often but i find it hard to belive that letting them out for a little bit causes any harm..

you would be suprised how long some of them can run around like that... besides i think its somewhat edicational for people who have never seen the speed theise guys realy are capable of..

My H.maculata and singapore blue are rediculous when it comes to speed.... i REALY would like to get a adult T. gigas so i can see them in action.. i also find them verry impressive.

most of the time if i let my T's run around about (maby once a month) i do it in my restroom. its verry tarantla friendly and theres realy no place for them to hide
 

kyrga

Arachnobaron
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Mar 24, 2007
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321
Very impressive.

On a somewhat unrelated note, does any one have any vids/pics of a T kicking hairs? I've always been curious as to what that's like, but I'm afraid to find out for myself :eek:
 

NBond1986

Arachnosquire
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Apr 24, 2007
Messages
148
your lucky you didnt get bit lol

oh, i wouldn't say so!!! ;P

with the way the spider was being handled...... there is very LITTLE likelihood of it biting, IMO.

I handle my fast arboreals once in a while as well. I even handle asian species and baboons......ONCE in a great while (it's not like i do this all the time)

I'll admit, you can never read a T or scorp with 100% accuracy. But you can make a pretty close guess to whether or not the creature in question feels like biting/stinging you.

And in the case of a P. cambridgei, I wouldn't worry too much about the venom effects anyway.
 

peterspiderling

Arachnosquire
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May 6, 2007
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hehe , i saw the vid before you put it on here, and i was inpresed, not somthing i would like to do lol, i was going to get a spiderling, but changed my mind at the last min for some reason :?
pete:}
 

Bothrops

Arachnobaron
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Jan 6, 2004
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I can see that P. cambridgei isn't a tarantula to play with, LOL.

I would handle it, too fast for me!

Nice video, though.

Cheers,
Bothrops
 

lunixweb

Arachnobaron
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Apr 15, 2007
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I think I read either in a tarantula keeper's guide book or on a post somewhere that running (like in the video) really takes a lot of energy out of the spider..so wouldn't bothering it like this just to make a "fast tarantula clip" really stress it out? Especially since you wasn't trying to rehouse it?
That's true, I agree :embarrassed:
 

TheDarkFinder

Arachnoangel
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Dec 18, 2004
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oh, i wouldn't say so!!! ;P

with the way the spider was being handled...... there is very LITTLE likelihood of it biting, IMO.

And in the case of a P. cambridgei, I wouldn't worry too much about the venom effects anyway.
No he should have been bit. No question, the only reason he did not get it was luck. He just lucked out.

In the case of P. cambridgei I would consider them on the not getting bit list. http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?s=&threadid=5669 is irmina

notice vomiting, muscle spasms and pain.
 

xgrafcorex

Thread Killer
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i agree with syndicate and thedarkfinder. the repeated response from the spider was "bugger off and leave me alone!" when you insist on handling a spider that gives out warning signs that should tell you to leave it alone..that is when bites usually happen.

thanks for sharing the video, but i hope you do understand what we are saying when we tell you how lucky you were not to have been bit.
 

Ice Cold Milk

Arachnobaron
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Jul 21, 2004
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Not trying to condone handling, but you're doing it as well as anyone could (with this species!). Kudos...
If it's female, wait a couple years when it's grown to 7"+...they're still just as fast! They're amazing... All but one of the P. cambridgei's i've owned were fast as lightning...

My H.maculata and singapore blue are rediculous when it comes to speed....
Ya don't try it with an H.mac...no matter how insane you are, lol....
On the other hand, Cyriopagopus sp. blue can sometimes be quite 'docile'...
my big girl is amazingly handleable, even more so than many of my Avicularia.
(handling pic: http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v350/Ice_Cold_Milk/Tarantulas/Cyriopagopus%20spec%20Blue/Singblue.jpg )
 

Taceas

Arachnolord
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May 12, 2006
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659
Man, I think I would have run faster than it out the door! :eek:

Beautiful T, though.
 

Gesticulator

Arachnoangel
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Jun 8, 2005
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I wouldn't exactly call that handling, but rather annoying the spider and making it run across your hands. Beautiful P cambridei yo have there.
 

Okitasoshi

Arachnosquire
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Nov 19, 2005
Messages
94
I would have left it alone when it jumped back in the cage...i find that the hardest part of handling a T is getting it back in the cage, although i don't handle often.
 

NBond1986

Arachnosquire
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Apr 24, 2007
Messages
148
No he should have been bit. No question, the only reason he did not get it was luck. He just lucked out.

In the case of P. cambridgei I would consider them on the not getting bit list. http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/showthread.php?s=&threadid=5669 is irmina

notice vomiting, muscle spasms and pain.
thanks for the bite/sting report....but I'm well aware of the venom effects, I've read extensively about the venom effects of all the 50+ inverts I own. however, the symptoms of envenomation dont have anything to do with the spider's temperament. there are perfectly docile species that could give worse bites. So, I'm afraid that is a flawed arguement.

All I'm saying, is that a warning of the likelihood of getting bitten is fine......but saying that he SHOULD have gotten bitten......how would you know that? How pessimistic of you. You weren't there, you weren't handling the spider.

I may be new to these boards, but I have 1000's of posts on others, along with 10 years under me. I'm no newbie, and all I'm saying is that I disagree with you. There is no saying that he SHOULD have gotten bitten. A spider's last resort is to bite. And the spider was fleeing from the STICK/NAIL FILE.....not from his hands.

If a spider feels something lightly touch it, it can:
1) do nothing
2) flee
3) turn and bite

In this case, the first thing touching the spider was a stick/nail file thing. NOT his hand. Any time there was spider-hand contact, it was because the spider RAN ONTO his hand.

Had he been practicing bad technique, I would wholeheartedly AGREE with you. But the fact is....he was doing everything as best a hobbyist can. The first thing to touch the spider should NEVER be your hand....and he knew that.

Sorry if I came across harshly. Didn't mean to. But please take my words into consideration.
 
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