some Aussie T`s

Grunto

Arachnopeon
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Dec 22, 2007
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pic 1. Selenotholus exquisita
pic 2. Phlogius sp. rubiseta male
pic 3. Selenotypus sp4
pic 4. Phlogius strenuus
pic 5. Phlogius spp. (currently under analysis)
 

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jbm150

Arachnoprince
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Keep 'em coming, I can't get enough of the Aussie Ts!

Your strenuus looks like my Aussie goliath (before he matured). Have any pics of female goliaths?
 

Steve Nunn

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Hey Grant,
Don't forget, Phlogius sp. "exquisita". Not described yet ;) And show them the pic of the 4th one next to its old moult (pic 004 and 054) ;)

Steve
 

LV-426

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i own 3 P crassipe slings about .75 inches. Are they fast or slow growers?
 

Steve Nunn

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Hmm, that's very hard one to judge. In Australia, we have what we consider rapid growers, which are all Phlogius spp. (particularly the Aussie Goliath). BUT, we compare them to our arid zone genera like Selenotholus and many Selenotypus. This is an issue because Australia is the only country with actual arid adapted selenocosmiines, making Selenotholus and Selenotypus unique compared to ALL other Selenocosmiinae, members from these genera can take over 6 years to mature, whereas most Phlogius spp. can mature in under 2.5 years if fed well and kept at reasonably high temps.

If I was to give a genus you could best compare Phlogius growth rates to, it would most likely be Chilobrachys (particularly Indian fauna).

And, size does matter, C.tropix will mature in under 2 years, some of the smaller Phlogius like PQ113 (blue leg) and sp. black mature quickly, the bigger ones (Goliath, P.strenuus, sp. Sarina, sp./form Eunice [masked] and P.crassipes a little longer.) BUT, then again, it depends on whether you are looking at males or females. The Goliath males can mature in 1 year at tiny sizes, varying to same size as the average adults (making them unique in Australia), most likely being a survival strategy to survive harsh environments (to 'beat' floods or draught, by maturing in 1 season, but also providing large strong males that can mate multiple times, during good whether conditions, they are making the most out of their environment-- making them one hell of an interesting tarantula IMO).

Steve
 

Grunto

Arachnopeon
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ah yes ...Selenotholus sp. "exquisita" , cheers Steve for correcting my oversight :worship:
 

Grunto

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Dec 22, 2007
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a few more pics :-

pic 1 : Selenotholus sp. exquisita
pic 2 : Phlogius sp. sarina
pic 3 & 4 : Phlogius sp. hirsutus (male)
pic 5 : Phlogius sp. hirsutus (female)
 

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Philth

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Hello, thanks for sharing the pics. Is the blueish one you have labeled "pic 5. Phlogius spp. (currently under analysis) " the same as what has been sold in the states as P. sp. "PQ113" ?

Later, Tom
 

syndicate

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Hello, thanks for sharing the pics. Is the blueish one you have labeled "pic 5. Phlogius spp. (currently under analysis) " the same as what has been sold in the states as P. sp. "PQ113" ?

Later, Tom
I was wondering the same thing!
-Chris
 

Steve Nunn

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Hi guys,
We aren't yet sure whether or not these are a blue colour form of PQ113 or P.strenuus, or whether they are a distinct species. We are working on it though. They definately belong to that group (northern Phlogius) and are probably closest related to the above mentioned two spp.
Steve
 

syndicate

Arachnoemperor
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Hi guys,
We aren't yet sure whether or not these are a blue colour form of PQ113 or P.strenuus, or whether they are a distinct species. We are working on it though. They definately belong to that group (northern Phlogius) and are probably closest related to the above mentioned two spp.
Steve
I was under the impression "PQ113" was supposed to show some hints of blue freshly molted right?I've never seen any pictured that were as blue as the above spider in the photos tho!!I hope to see a revision of all the Aussie tarantulas in the not to far future!
-Chris
 

Philth

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I was under the impression "PQ113" was supposed to show some hints of blue freshly molted right?I've never seen any pictured that were as blue as the above spider in the photos tho!!
-Chris
Same here , If I remember correctly "PQ 113" were tagged with the name "blue leg" or "blue femur" buy some dealers. Although my "PQ 113" show some blue highlights, in the right lighting , right after a molt, I've never seen one as pretty as the one posted above. Nice spider and pics.

I also look forward for a nice Aussie paper :cool:

Later, Tom
 

Grunto

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Dec 22, 2007
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PQ113 is synonymous with our cf.papuanus (same spider different name , don`t ask :? ) , PQ113 is known for it`s very deep blue colouration on its femurs postmoult .

Phlogius sp.sarina is another which displays an awesome blue postmoult , not as deep as PQ113 but also not as vibrant as the one pictured above .

The one above I recieved as Phlogius strenuus but it remains to be seen if it is just a postmoult oddity of that species , a colour form of that species or something entirely new . The exuvia is being sent to Steve as of this Monday , I could have taken a look at the exuvia myself and made a determination however I feel this sort of analysis is best left to those more in the know plus i didn`t want to inadvertantly ruin the exuvia or make a wrongful determination ...there`s enough confusion surrounding our Aussie T`s atm .
 
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jim777

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The Phlogius Rubiseta is gorgeous; are these typically available in the US or does Australia restrict their transfer out of country?
 

syndicate

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The Phlogius Rubiseta is gorgeous; are these typically available in the US or does Australia restrict their transfer out of country?
Phlogius sp. "Rubiseta" is not available in the USA.Austrailia is very strict about letting anything in or out of the country but there have been about 3 or 4 imports into the USA so far.
-Chris
 
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