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Skippy´s millipedes

Discussion in 'Myriapods' started by skippy666, Aug 3, 2019.

  1. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoangel Active Member

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    By the way, @skippy666, what is your care regimen? Your specimens breed like crazy, and I'd love to know what you are doing with them so that I can try and replicate it, if you know what I mean.

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  2. skippy666

    skippy666 Arachnopeon

    Which species do you mean now? If velvet worms, I am just working on article to Reptilia magazine where I would like to summarize it :)
     
  3. skippy666

    skippy666 Arachnopeon

    Okay, let´s show some pill millipedes :)

    Rhopalomeris sp.1: big, dark with red edge (Hua Hin)

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    Rhopalomeris sp.2: light yellow, no red (Bang Saphan)

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    Rhopalomeris cf. carnifex

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    Hyleoglomeris sp.1: small (Kanchanaburi)

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    Hyleoglomeris sp.2: bigger (Hua Hin)

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    • Like Like x 3
  4. Amazing collection. I could only wish to have some of these in mine here in the US.
     
  5. skippy666

    skippy666 Arachnopeon

    Some update - I am trying to bring another dragon millipede species to hobby - Desmoxytes sp. , possibly Desmoxytes delfae, but further determination is needed.

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    ... and mating behavior :)
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    • Like Like x 2
  6. mantisfan101

    mantisfan101 Arachnoangel Active Member

    I can’t even properly express my jealousy for your collection. Everything about it blew me away. Definitely following this!
     
    • Agree Agree x 1
  7. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoangel Active Member

    @skippy666, hats off to you for trying to bring another species of dragon millipede into the hobby. As @mantisfan101 said, I cannot properly express how amazing your collection is and how much I would love to keep even half of the species you have.
    Where do you get your specimens from?

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  8. The Chicobolus spinigerus you have are unbelievable, love the baby blue, so rare in millipedes.

    And the dragon millipedes you have are epic and out of this world. You are a legend. The morphology is probably stunning in the entire genus, one would think, given these examples.

    I suggest Narceus americanus, if you have Narceus gordanus. If anything, you could try pairing Narceus americanus with N. gordanus, probably a female gordanus with a male americanus since the gordanus species have shorter legs overall. I don't know if Narceus hybrids are common or have been attempted before but that'd be a interesting venture. I may attempt this in the near future. I should really be focusing on breeding my pedes first.
     
  9. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoangel Active Member

    @Adam Cochran, just know that by mentioning hybridizing millipedes you may get some hard replies.
    I will say that you should avoid doing this at all, as it is incredibly easy to muck up bloodlines and gene pools, especially if you lose some offspring in other containers or sell some off to someone without the proper ID. This has already happened with many cockroach species. I can only imagine what could happen with popular Narceus sp.

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  10. Another amazing millipede genus. Extraordinary features and vivid color. They look so much like a centipede in form. Especially the legs. If someone that didn't know jack about millipedes nor centipedes looked at these kinds of millipedes, they might think they were centipedes.

    Wonder as to why this genus has those elongated spines? Served some sort of purpose, I figure.

    I also love those pill millipedes. I for one cannot seem to find any info about pill millipedes, and I would like to know where and how to find one if they occur in my area of southern Kentucky. Perhaps they do.
     
  11. IF I ever did such a thing as you mention, I would definitely keep the offspring in their own sealed container with their own label and never release any offspring into the wild. That is, if the offspring were viable. I'm still learning.

    I guess mucking up gene pools is a bad thing. I should have knew this. But I can't help but to experiment once in a while. The novelty of a hybrid millipede is quite tempting--for me anyway.

    Pardon my risky fantasies.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  12. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoangel Active Member

    @Adam Cochran, your right, it is quite tempting. But there are already many species available to us, and even more if you get the permit (PPQ526 from the USDA/APHIS) that allows you to import exotic species. We don't need hybrid millipedes when we already have so many amazing species.

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  13. I bet it would irk you something awful if I experimented a little with hybridization and then let the offspring go free. You must really care a lot about genetic diversity that makes each specie unique. Not everyone feels the same.
     
  14. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoangel Active Member

    @Adam Cochran, I understand experimenting a little with hybridization. It is important to know which species can and can't hybridize, and that is part of a scientific pursuit that can help us learn more about these amazing creatures. I say if that is something you absolutely have to do, go for it, just so long as you take the proper precautions to protect the wild and captive populations of the species you are working with.

    However: releasing hybrids into the wild damages the purity of bloodlines, and in some cases it can lead to the declination of a species because the hybrid's genes mess up the wild-type genes. While this is worst-case scenario, I do care about every species that we watch over in captivity (and many we don't), so conservation should always be the number one goal.

    If you look at any thread on here about hybridizing roaches, tarantulas, or pretty much anything else, you can see why we generally don't advocate for hybridizing different species. Here are some good thoughts on the matter: http://arachnoboards.com/threads/when-people-hybridize.319931/#post-2932873


    In the end, if you do decide to go for it, please make sure you keep tabs on any hybrids produced (if gordanus and americanus can even be hybridized remains to be seen), and please don't release them into the wild. Talk with any respectable enthusiast and they will tell you why.

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  15. Sorry for causing tension.

    I was feeling a little... testy.
     
  16. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoangel Active Member

    @Adam Cochran, no worries, we all feel frustrated at times, and that's when I have to watch what I type the most. Just watch out in the future though. You will find members on here who will give it to you and won't stop, no matter what anyone says.

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  17. skippy666

    skippy666 Arachnopeon

    Long time to see you :) , some updates

    Epibolus pulchripes - great species for beginners

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    Epibolus pulchripes - breeding

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    Benoitolus siamensis under UV

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    Ommatoiulus rufilans - mating behavior
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    Ommatoiulus rufilans - nice European species
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    Orthomorpha sp. from North Perak
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    Orthomorpha sp. from North Perak - breeding

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    • Like Like x 3
  18. Arthroverts

    Arthroverts Arachnoangel Active Member

    Awesome millipedes, as usual! Do you keep other things besides isopods, millipedes, and velvet worms?
    What is your substrate mix by the way?

    Thanks,

    Arthroverts
     
  19. Marika

    Marika Arachnobaron

    Those Ommatoiulus rufilans are beautiful. Are they easy to keep and breed?
     
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