Should I get a Honduran Curly Hair or a Mexican Red Knee?

Bugmom

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For many years B. smithi and B. annitha are consider to be two separate species. With the new taxonomy revision on the Brachypelma species from my understanding is Brachypelma annitha will no longer be a valid name. Supposedly it suppose to be Brachypelma hamorii. This is not 100% percent true but that is the word that it has been said to me. So if that is the case annitha is still and will be a separate species like it should. I've had a few specimens of smithi and annitha and still do at home there is a difference between the two.
You guys need to to spend some extra cash when annitha is available for sale so you can see the difference between the two species, same with Brachypelma boehmei and baumgarteni. A lot of people are missing out on the baumgarteni. For the first time in history the female baumgarteni will finally be described. Watch out for the hybrids between boehmei and baumgarteni. Purchase from dealers that have the pure species don't miss out on them.
I bought an adult female B. baumgarteni earlier this year and man, what a beautiful tarantula. Absolutely stunning.

I have what I am sure is a boehmei hybrid also. By all accounts, I would expect him to be mature by now. He's at or near 6" leg span, refuses to eat after his last molt, and acts like a mature male, but no emboli. I don't know what's up with him and I wonder if it has anything to do with being a hybrid. He's very pretty, as you can see, but I don't believe him to be a pure boehmei so he's a pet only (photo of him below). I don't expect him to be around much longer since he's refused every manner of feeder I've given him (including bug soup, just in case).

 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Arachnoprince
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I bought an adult female B. baumgarteni earlier this year and man, what a beautiful tarantula. Absolutely stunning.

I have what I am sure is a boehmei hybrid also. By all accounts, I would expect him to be mature by now. He's at or near 6" leg span, refuses to eat after his last molt, and acts like a mature male, but no emboli. I don't know what's up with him and I wonder if it has anything to do with being a hybrid. He's very pretty, as you can see, but I don't believe him to be a pure boehmei so he's a pet only (photo of him below). I don't expect him to be around much longer since he's refused every manner of feeder I've given him (including bug soup, just in case).

Yes he is a hybrid baumgarteni/boehmei. You have a female baumgarteni lets see photos? Who did you purchase from?
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Arachnoprince
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Swift.

I can't get the other photos I have of her to upload but here's one.
I had a feeling you were going to say Swift. I remember him telling me that he had a female that he put up for sale. Swift also just weeks ago acquire the new bloodline baumgarteni from Mexico. If you have not gotten any yet you should. This new bloodlines were produced by a wild caught female and was bred by Jorge Mendoza the taxonomist who is publishing the new Brachypelma revision. I bought some of those baumgarteni when they were imported.
 

Bugmom

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I had a feeling you were going to say Swift. I remember him telling me that he had a female that he put up for sale. Swift also just weeks ago acquire the new bloodline baumgarteni from Mexico. If you have not gotten any yet you should. This new bloodlines were produced by a wild caught female and was bred by Jorge Mendoza the taxonomist who is publishing the new Brachypelma revision. I bought some of those baumgarteni when they were imported.
I saw that he had baumgarteni for sale, with CITES documentation. It's very tempting to get some.

I don't know how I'll find a true baumgarteni male for my female. If you have any ideas, I'm all ears.
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Arachnoprince
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I saw that he had baumgarteni for sale, with CITES documentation. It's very tempting to get some.

I don't know how I'll find a true baumgarteni male for my female. If you have any ideas, I'm all ears.
I have two males they are the ones from Holland and they are true baumgarteni. These males are from two to three generations of inbreeding, so if that does not bother you you can pm me and go from there. I'm only letting one go though.
 

Jeff23

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Out of curiosity where does B. klassi fit in on the hair flicking when compared to the other Brach's? For their price the tarantula should be required to sign a "No Flick" agreement.
 
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Vanessa

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I have three of each species and I am always going to vote Brachypelma albopilosum above nearly all other species - even the Brachypelma smithi.
My two juvenile male B.smithi are hair kicking demons. The minute I move their enclosure the tiniest bit - they spin around and start kicking hair at me. I have had to start wearing gloves because of them specifically. I have an absolute darling juvenile female B.smithi, who I got only a couple of weeks back, and she is the complete opposite. She never kicks hairs at me and I have even handled her a tiny bit. She is the complete opposite of my boys.
None of the B.smithi do much moving and they are not active at all... except when they're kicking hair at me. None of them burrow and they basically sit on their substrate, sit in their hide, or sometimes sit on their fake plants. They are not active in the least. The female might be a bit more active than the boys are, but she is literally in the same spot for hours on end.
I have a juvenile male, juvenile female, and an unsexed spiderling of the B. albopilosum. None of them kick hairs. The boy is constantly on the move and burrowing and making all these cool tunnels. When he isn't doing that - he is filling his waterdish. My female is very active in the evenings and I see her moving around all the time. She doesn't burrow, but does use her hide. The spiderling is also a burrowing maniac.
In my experience, I would have to say that my B. albopilosum are far more active than my B.smithi are. The albo's have far better appetites and are faster growing. Overall, I would say that they are both fairly tolerant, but because of the hair kicking buggers, I would have to put the B.albo's higher in that category too.
Brachypelma albopilosum gets my vote... hands down.
My gorgeous bunch.... not drab at all in my books.
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Vanessa

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Just to be fair, though...
my B.smithi are pretty cooperative models, once they've calmed down a bit and are a favourite of mine to photograph. Especially my little girl, Autumn. She is far better behaved than the naughty little boys.
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Moakmeister

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Thanks for all the advice y'all. What about a Grammastola pulchripes? They look like a bigger albopilosum, but do they live as long, and are they as docile?
 

Thistles

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Thanks for all the advice y'all. What about a Grammastola pulchripes? They look like a bigger albopilosum, but do they live as long, and are they as docile?
They're also a great choice! True beauties, gentle and giant, with long lives.
 

Vanessa

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Thanks for all the advice y'all. What about a Grammastola pulchripes? They look like a bigger albopilosum, but do they live as long, and are they as docile?
They look considerably different to the B. albopilosum. I have a sub-adult female and a mature male. Although I have never seen any defensive behaviour from them, not even a hair kick, they have always been far more skittish than some of my others. I also find them faster growing than some of their slower cousins.
They are absolutely stunning and I adore them.
My female, Portia.
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My male, Brutus.
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Moakmeister

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They look considerably different to the B. albopilosum. I have a sub-adult female and a mature male. Although I have never seen any defensive behaviour from them, not even a hair kick, they have always been far more skittish than some of my others. I also find them faster growing than some of their slower cousins.
They are absolutely stunning and I adore them.
My female, Portia.
View attachment 224640

My male, Brutus.
View attachment 224641
sounds good, BUT do they live as long/allow you to pinch grab them?
 

Vanessa

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sounds good, BUT do they live as long/allow you to pinch grab them?
Females are probably in the 15-20 year range for lifespan, while males will be much shorter. I try not to pinch grab anyone unless it is necessary. It can be very dangerous, especially if they are smaller.
 

Moakmeister

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Females are probably in the 15-20 year range for lifespan, while males will be much shorter. I try not to pinch grab anyone unless it is necessary. It can be very dangerous, especially if they are smaller.
dang. rly wanted my first T to live for thirty years. ill stick with the albopilosum.
 

14pokies

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dang. rly wanted my first T to live for thirty years. ill stick with the albopilosum.
Just because a T can live for 30 years doesn't mean it will.. Chances are high you won't make it 30 more years.. Buy a T that appeals to you and take it day to day bro..
 

Vanessa

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dang. rly wanted my first T to live for thirty years. ill stick with the albopilosum.
They don't live to be thirty years either. Probably closer to the twenty year mark.
Only the really slow growers, B.smithi, G.porteri, have the potential of living that long. And it isn't a guarantee that they will live that long, but that is the top end of the spectrum for those species.
 
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