Should I get a Honduran Curly Hair or a Mexican Red Knee?

johnny quango

Arachnoknight
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May 17, 2013
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262
Have i just seen nothing but bad footage of albopilosum? That's not at all what i thought they looked like. I even held a mature male in my hand just a few days ago, and it, too, seemed to be a solid brown/black color.
That said, your T's are awesome-looking and adorably fluffy :)
Seeing as there are a lot of pictures of B albo slings here's my juvenile around 3" i hope it helps
 

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Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Arachnoprince
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Jun 17, 2007
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For starter if you're going to get a Brachypelma albopilosum I would get the ones from Nicaragua, the photos of the albopilosum that have been posted are the "Hobby" specimens. You could also do Brachypelma annitha since you like the smithi or this is even better idea get all four. I will post photos of the Brachypelma albopilosum "Nicaragua", hobby Brachypelma albopilosum "Hobby", Brachypelma annitha and Brachypelma smithi.

Brachypelma albopilosum "Hobby"

Brachypelma albopilosum "Nicaragua"

Brachypelma annitha

Brachypelma smithi
 

dopamine

Arachnobaron
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341
B. albopilosum FTW. They look so cuddly lol. When they're slings they make some pretty impressive burrows, too.
 

Moakmeister

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For starter if you're going to get a Brachypelma albopilosum I would get the ones from Nicaragua, the photos of the albopilosum that have been posted are the "Hobby" specimens. You could also do Brachypelma annitha since you like the smithi or this is even better idea get all four. I will post photos of the Brachypelma albopilosum "Nicaragua", hobby Brachypelma albopilosum "Hobby", Brachypelma annitha and Brachypelma smithi.

Brachypelma albopilosum "Hobby"

Brachypelma albopilosum "Nicaragua"

Brachypelma annitha

Brachypelma smithi
I would very much like an annitha, but ive been told that its actually just a different population of smithi. Plus, theyre rare, expensive, and hard to tell from smithis, so even if i find one, its probably either a scam or an innocent mistake.
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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My debate comes in because the smithi is apparently a hair-kicker to the max. I've seen them kick hairs when someone holds their hand above them. This would make me go for the albopilosum, but the smithi looks so much more awesome. The albopilosum is a dull brown color, not really very appealing. So, tarantula experts, I ask you: which tarantula is more fun, and a better overall experience?
When you buy a Brachy the flicking is a crapshoot. You can buy any of them and end up with a flicker that you despise. There's always MANY exceptions to the rule of "flickiness" most to least (for the most common asked) boehmei>emilia>smithi>albo

I have adult females I raised since sling (except for boehmei) and so far their behavior fits the above. At no time can I predict what/when they will fick. Except boehmei, that's an almost 100% guarantee for anything husbandry related that requires removal of lid (NOT FUN).

Aside, my smith and albo have pretty much the same pet rock behavior. One is no "different" than the next.

For eating, albo is one incredible eater. She also didn't eat for 18 months as well.
 

ErinM31

Arachnogoddess
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Feb 25, 2016
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1,166
For starter if you're going to get a Brachypelma albopilosum I would get the ones from Nicaragua, the photos of the albopilosum that have been posted are the "Hobby" specimens. You could also do Brachypelma annitha since you like the smithi or this is even better idea get all four. I will post photos of the Brachypelma albopilosum "Nicaragua", hobby Brachypelma albopilosum "Hobby", Brachypelma annitha and Brachypelma smithi.

Brachypelma albopilosum "Hobby"

Brachypelma albopilosum "Nicaragua"

Brachypelma annitha

Brachypelma smithi
Can I rate this post "love", "informative" and "helpful"! :D Gorgeous T's! :astonished:

Is it the color of the setae that indicates the B. albopilosum "hobby" has been outcrossed?
 

Jeff23

Arachnolord
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I have an adult B. Smithi and it hasn't kicked hairs at me yet. It eats live prey regularly. I don't own an albopilosum so I can't give a comparison.
 

Thistles

Arachnobroad
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Mar 21, 2012
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623
Can I rate this post "love", "informative" and "helpful"! :D Gorgeous T's! :astonished:

Is it the color of the setae that indicates the B. albopilosum "hobby" has been outcrossed?
The "albopilosum" part of the name means "white hair." The WC Nicaraguans are definitely paler than the golden hobby specimens, so it's a good first indicator. The WC are also fluffier. Keeping good labels is also important. Who knows how diluted the new ones will end up being down the road... It could also just be a locality difference. I think initially hobby stock came from Honduras, but I could be mistaken.
 

Draketeeth

Arachnoknight
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Mar 22, 2015
Messages
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I've got two B. albos and really adore them. The species was my first tarantula, and I have no real complaints about them. I've not had either of mine ever flick a hair or throw a threat pose. My older albo just likes to keep to itself in its burrow and sometimes pile substrate in its water dish. My younger albo was sold to me at discount from the LPS because no one wanted the "common brown spider" and they all missed out, I've got a full time excavator on my hands who has a fearless streak. It's fabulous. Neither have refused a meal. My older albo just molted and went from a pretty dusty brown with pale pink hairs to a stunning chocolate brown with those pale hairs. They had different personalities right from the start with one being more shy, and the other more willing to remain out in the open.

If someone were to present me with the choice between another albo sling or my first smithi, I'd pick the albo, no contest. I love the curly little dears.

however I'd turn down either in a heartbeat for an Euathlus sp. red.
 

Andrea82

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I have a B.smithi and a B.albopilosum. The B.smithi kicks hair as soon as I open the enclosure, then when I fill her waterdish, remove boli, and lastly, when I drop a feeder in. Which sucks, cause I am developing an increasing sensitivity/allergy to especially her hairs.
She makes up for it by being stunning, always in plain sight, and an almost compulsive relicator :D

My B.albopilosum female was a hobbyform, so it doesn't have long white hairs, but short pinkish. (sold her), same with my MM. I also have a sling, don't know much about gender or colouring.
The female was quiet, good eater, but didn't do much. My male was the same, until he molted to maturity. He is now a threatposing, fang-baring, nervous little guy who chases everything, from water to my tongs, or the lid of his enclosure.
The sling is a bit zappy, but a great eater.
 

Formerphobe

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Feb 27, 2011
Messages
2,342
None of my Brachypelma have been hair flickers but, they are all individuals in that regard. My B smithi male has gotten a little flighty as he nears maturity.
You can't go wrong with any of the species in the genus. Just pick one.
 

Bugmom

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Joined
May 28, 2012
Messages
650
The "albopilosum" part of the name means "white hair." The WC Nicaraguans are definitely paler than the golden hobby specimens, so it's a good first indicator. The WC are also fluffier. Keeping good labels is also important. Who knows how diluted the new ones will end up being down the road... It could also just be a locality difference. I think initially hobby stock came from Honduras, but I could be mistaken.
I've always known them as the Honduran Curly Hair.

According to Tarantupedia:
Brachypelma albopilosum is a species of tarantula known commonly as the Honduran curlyhair or simply Curlyhair tarantula. Its native range includes Central America, from Honduras to Costa Rica.

They are terrestrial, opportunistic burrowing spiders. This tarantula is covered in long hairs that have a characteristic curl to them giving them a unique look.

The Curlyhair tarantula is a plump-bodied spider, covered with dark brown to black hair. It has a golden-bronze sheen due to longer gold hairs that cover the whole body, which are particularly dense on the hind legs.Males are often a lighter bronze color than females.
 

Exoskeleton Invertebrates

Arachnoprince
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1,092
I would very much like an annitha, but ive been told that its actually just a different population of smithi. Plus, theyre rare, expensive, and hard to tell from smithis, so even if i find one, its probably either a scam or an innocent mistake.
For many years B. smithi and B. annitha are consider to be two separate species. With the new taxonomy revision on the Brachypelma species from my understanding is Brachypelma annitha will no longer be a valid name. Supposedly it suppose to be Brachypelma hamorii. This is not 100% percent true but that is the word that it has been said to me. So if that is the case annitha is still and will be a separate species like it should. I've had a few specimens of smithi and annitha and still do at home there is a difference between the two.
You guys need to to spend some extra cash when annitha is available for sale so you can see the difference between the two species, same with Brachypelma boehmei and baumgarteni. A lot of people are missing out on the baumgarteni. For the first time in history the female baumgarteni will finally be described. Watch out for the hybrids between boehmei and baumgarteni. Purchase from dealers that have the pure species don't miss out on them.

Don't wonder about the species get them and enjoy them.
 
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