Phrynus whitei husbandry

wizentrop

to the rescue!
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Apr 20, 2005
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I rate Phrynus whitei among the easiest amblypygid species to keep. They tolerate various humidity conditions (don't let it dry out completely though), and can even survive brief cold periods. However, it is important to remember that P. whitei is a polymorphic species and regarded as a species complex in much need of revision. The ones I keep come from Honduras, and they do not look like your typical P. whitei, lacking the bright spots near the lateral eyes and sporting a jet black color. They may very well be a different species. Yours seem to originate from a Costa Rican or a Guatemalan population.
Generally speaking,the same conditions that are good for keeping Phrynus barbadensis can be applied for Phrynus whitei.
 

mantisfan101

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Just brought home a Phrynus whitei and I know it needs higher humidity than other species of tailless whip scorpions, but I can’t seem to find much else regarding husbandry!
Also, how did you manage to get whitei in the us? The only species I’ve seen are marginemaculatus, carolynae, medius, and diadema.
 

Michrich

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Feb 12, 2020
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I rate Phrynus whitei among the easiest amblypygid species to keep. They tolerate various humidity conditions (don't let it dry out completely though), and can even survive brief cold periods. However, it is important to remember that P. whitei is a polymorphic species and regarded as a species complex in much need of revision. The ones I keep come from Honduras, and they do not look like your typical P. whitei, lacking the bright spots near the lateral eyes and sporting a jet black color. They may very well be a different species. Yours seem to originate from a Costa Rican or a Guatemalan population.
Generally speaking,the same conditions that are good for keeping Phrynus barbadensis can be applied for Phrynus whitei.
Great, thank you! I have it in my warm and humid room with my more tropical tarantula species so it should be perfect in there. Do they move around their enclosures much? I have it in a pretty small container right now (5x5x8) but it never really moves from behind it’s cork bark so I was wondering if it was fine in that or if it would do better with more room to roam?
 

Albireo Wulfbooper

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Great, thank you! I have it in my warm and humid room with my more tropical tarantula species so it should be perfect in there. Do they move around their enclosures much? I have it in a pretty small container right now (5x5x8) but it never really moves from behind it’s cork bark so I was wondering if it was fine in that or if it would do better with more room to roam?
I have mine in a 6"x4"x9" tall food storage container and it's happy as a pig in poop. Rarely moves, except to wave those whips around or nab a cricket. I keep its substrate moist but not soaked, and have a small (~1.5" square) wire screen vent on top. No additional heating or humidity, just room temperature. I add water to its substrate if I see it hanging out closer to the bottom. Easy-peasy.
 

mantisfan101

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Seems that paraphrynus and phrynus species are becoming more popular here in the states. I’ve heard reports that there’s even some cubensis available now! Hopefully we can get more people to start keeping these guys, I’d love to establish these in the hobby and stop having to collect damon medius and whatnot from the wild.
 

wizentrop

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Paraphrynus cubensis is VERY easy, not something I would say about other Paraphrynus species.
 

mantisfan101

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Don’t mean to derail the thread, but what makes the other paraphrynus difficult to care for? How about P. carolynae? I’ve seen those for sale occasionally but couldn’t find much care info about them.
 

wizentrop

to the rescue!
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They are not difficult to care for, but if you are interested in long-term keeping and breeding there is seasonality and environmental factors that are required as triggers. Many of those are not yet well understood.
 
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