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heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
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Feb 24, 2011
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Okay sweet, so a juvie will be good in my containers, but should be kept in something larger when they are adults. Are those the plastic shoe boxes? I might try that. Because I have a lot of herps and stuff in my room, and dont have a lot of room for actual aquariums anymore lol.
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
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Feb 24, 2011
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Sweet thanks for the link. I'll buy a couple from that site when mine grow up or if I get adults.
 

Rob1985

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Thanks for all the replies guys. Since you guys dont recomend them for beginners, I wont go with H.lividum or T.blondi. Although I do really like them, I want the best for the T's and if that means I need to wait and get more experienced, then I will! So I'm thinking of the B.smithi. These were the first ones I really started to like. avicularia are pretty cool. How do I set up a aboreal set up?
B. smithi is a great choice! Awesome T's! :clap:

I'd go for the GBB after you get hooked into the obsession! {D
 

Rob1985

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Sweet thanks for the link. I'll buy a couple from that site when mine grow up or if I get adults.
also try www.tarantulahomes.com, I am sure Vitaliy would appreciate the business.

He has several sizes of enclosures.

---------- Post added at 05:44 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:42 PM ----------

Anyone have any B.smithi for sale? :)
Check the "For Sale/Trade/Want to Buy" section. ;)

click link below

http://www.arachnoboards.com/ab/forumdisplay.php?f=24
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
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I'd go with an Avic species... especially since beginners are not ready for the speed and aggression of an H. lividum. They WILL catch you off guard. The T. blondi can be hard to keep if you're not competent in adjusting humidity levels and the urticating hairs can be a nightmare!

I am a huge fan of the the Haplos, but whatever you choose please read up on the care of it.
They keep Dart Frogs which is much much harder to keep than any tarantula I own old or new world. So I think they would be okay for a Theraphosa sp. They just need to research it and they should be fine.

If you don't plan on handling I say, get whichever you want. You will never see the H. lividum, and like said above the Theraphosa sp. you would purchase has really bad urticating hairs. B. smithi would be a good one if you want to handle. Although I don't advise handling of any species.
 

Rob1985

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They keep Dart Frogs which is much much harder to keep than any tarantula I own old or new world. So I think they would be okay for a Theraphosa sp. They just need to research it and they should be fine.

If you don't plan on handling I say, get whichever you want. You will never see the H. lividum, and like said above the Theraphosa sp. you would purchase has really bad urticating hairs. B. smithi would be a good one if you want to handle. Although I don't advise handling of any species.
There's a big difference... :wall:
 

Sleazoid

Arachnoknight
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There's a big difference... :wall:
I never said there wasn't? But to say a T. blondi would be harder to care for than a dart frog species is kind of silly. I kept Snakes years before I kept tarantulas, yes they are totally different and nothing alike. But since I cared for snake species that required higher humidity needs, it was much easier for me to get into species of tarantulas that require higher humidity needs. That is basically what I was saying.
 

Rob1985

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I never said there wasn't? But to say a T. blondi would be harder to care for than a dart frog species is kind of silly. I kept Snakes years before I kept tarantulas, yes they are totally different and nothing alike. But since I cared for snake species that required higher humidity needs, it was much easier for me to get into species of tarantulas that require higher humidity needs. That is basically what I was saying.
never said caring for a T. blondi was harder to care for than Dart Frogs . I said "The T. blondi can be hard to keep if you're not competent in adjusting humidity levels". That means it can be a challenge to deal with tarantula humidity levels if you've never owned one before. :embarrassed:
 

Sleazoid

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never said caring for a T. blondi was harder to care for than Dart Frogs . I said "The T. blondi can be hard to keep if you're not competent in adjusting humidity levels". That means it can be a challenge to deal with tarantula humidity levels if you've never owned one before. :embarrassed:
I understand that. But he has dealt with an animal that requires higher humidity levels before, so it should be a problem for him to care for a tarantula with higher humidity levels. Therefore he should be competent in adjusting the humidity levels for the Theraphosa species correct? Understand now? :?
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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Theraphosa is not kept the same as a poison dart frog. Frogs are kept swampy. Theraphosa shouldnt be in sopping conditions.

OP: There are plenty of big beautiful Ts you may like more. The genus Xenethsis and Phamphobetus are both big and you might want to spend a little extra cash if you really only want one. {D Of course that might change soon. ;)
 

Sleazoid

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Theraphosa is not kept the same as a poison dart frog. Frogs are kept swampy. Theraphosa shouldnt be in sopping conditions.
I have never once said they should be kept the same. I said since the dart frog requires higher humidity the OP should be completely find taking care of a species of tarantula that requires higher humidity. The OP should be well aware how to control humidity by now.
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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I have never once said they should be kept the same. I said since the dart frog requires higher humidity the OP should be completely find taking care of a species of tarantula that requires higher humidity. The OP should be well aware how to control humidity by now.
From this question i gather he is keeping humidity up without ventilation. :? Thats not the proper way to keep up the humidity for a Theraphosa.

Well I'm pretty sure I wont have a problem keeping up humidity if I need to becasue I keep poison dart frogs, and they need it VERY humid lol. What size enclosure would you recomend for a B.smithi? I have 160 oz. containers, would one be okay in there? Or would it need a larger enclosure? As for ventilation, would just taking the lid off to feed/mist/ect. be okay? The 160 oz. containers have plastic lid with no ventilation... Or would I be better off with a criter keeper with a screen lid?
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
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Feb 24, 2011
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Sorry I didn't mean to start a argument guys... As for that ventilation post, if I were to have a T.blondi I would have ventilation for it. I'm thinking about getting some of those shoe boxes from that link posted earlier. As for the dart frogs, you really dont want the frogs THAT swampy... If its too wet it can actualy damage their feet from being constantly saturated and they can die of this. You want it very humid, just not where the substrate is swampy. I know they are both very different creatures and need to be kept differently. I think Sleazoid was just refering that I'm good at keeping humidity up since I have experience with dart frogs. I dont think he was saying for me to keep them the exact same way, just pointing out that I HAVE had experience with high humidity animals. Would you guys suggest I poke holes for more ventilation for my N.cromatus? I take the lid off like once a day for ventilation and to view or mis or feed or whatever. But if its better for the T's health to put ventilation holes in it I will do it.
 

Rob1985

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Sorry I didn't mean to start a argument guys... As for that ventilation post, if I were to have a T.blondi I would have ventilation for it. I'm thinking about getting some of those shoe boxes from that link posted earlier. As for the dart frogs, you really dont want the frogs THAT swampy... If its too wet it can actualy damage their feet from being constantly saturated and they can die of this. You want it very humid, just not where the substrate is swampy. I know they are both very different creatures and need to be kept differently. I think Sleazoid was just refering that I'm good at keeping humidity up since I have experience with dart frogs. I dont think he was saying for me to keep them the exact same way, just pointing out that I HAVE had experience with high humidity animals. Would you guys suggest I poke holes for more ventilation for my N.cromatus? I take the lid off like once a day for ventilation and to view or mis or feed or whatever. But if its better for the T's health to put ventilation holes in it I will do it.
Cross ventilation is the best way... I prefer screens in the sides and tops of larger containers and holes done with a soldering gun on smaller. I know to keep the substrate drier, some put holes below the substrate line.
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
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Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
Okay, well I was going to get those plastic shoe boxes today. So I would need holes in the side since I'll be stacking them. So I read some care sheets online about B.smithi, and it said to keep the humidity like 60-75%, so should I do like a light mist a week? Or should I never mist. I mist my N.chromatus like a light mist once a week, someone on another forum told me thats good.
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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For a Dry loving T: If its a spiderling you can mist half the enclosure. If they are above 1" put a bottle cap in for a water dish. If its over a 1.5" they need NO misting or extra humidiity, just a water dish. For a "swamp dwelling" T just continue misting even as juvies and adults.


Ventilation
Start off by poking/melting/drilling ONLY a few holes. I put four 1/8" holes in each corner of the 7x11x4H shoe boxes on the side. You can always add holes later if you need to. ;) You dont want to put too many holes or you will lose humidity.

Consider this: Adding ventilation holes to the top holds more humidity but air flow is restricted.(also not the best for stacking) Cross ventilation causes a major drop in humidity but high air circulation. Finding a balance between humidity and circulation is the goal.

My point: Dont over cross ventilate for a high humidity sp. For a dry loving T, such as N. chromatus and B. smithi.. They are no concerns for reducing ventilation and they preffer it DRY.
 
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heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
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Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
What do you mean done over cross ventilate for high humidity sp? I'm going to go to the store probably pretty soon today so look for some of the shoe boxes. What do you mean put 4 holes in each corner? Could you post a picture of one of your set ups? I just really dont want to mess up. Also how low should I put the holes? If I go get the shoe boxes today can I put my N.cromatus in it? My N.cromatus is about just under 1". You said I dont need to mist it anymore? I do already have a small bottle cap full of water in for it now. When it gets over 1.5" do I still leave a water source in for it? And you said N.cromatus is a dry species?
 
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