Newbie

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
Hey everyone, I'm a newbie with arachnids. I come from the poison dart frog world. So totaly new here. I just wanted to say hi. I curently have a Nhandu Cromatus, a juvie. I was thinking of getting either a Mexican Red Knee, Cobalt blue, or Goliath bird eater next tarantula. What do you guys think? Any suggestions? Thanks.
 

fatich

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Mar 22, 2008
Messages
414
Welcome to the board ;)
Actually you should write it like Nhandu chromatus (its just an information)

Brachypelma smithi,Haplopelma lividum and Theraphosa blondi are different kind of species.Brachypelma and Theraphosa species are terrestial and Haplopelma species are tunnel species.

You can find more informations in the forum.
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
Hi, yes I do know that Haplopelma are tunnel species. They are just extreamly pretty lol. If I had to pick one of the three, I think I would pick the Theraphosa. I've always loved these guys! Has anyone had experience with any of these though and want to share how you like them? Thanks.

Edit: I forgot to ask, is there a thread on here that helps you pronounce any of these? Lol. I'm starting to learn the names, but have no clue how to say them!
 
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mikebannon

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 14, 2010
Messages
27
i would not go with H .lividum. In my opinion it is like payng for a case of dirt you never see them. T. blondi is a nice choice but the urticating hairs are bad. B. smithi wouldbe the best choice because you are still a beggner. There very calm and buetiful ! what ever you choose good luck!
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
Okay thanks for the info. I need to read up a little more on the urticating hairs. If I got a T. blondi it would be more for show, I wouldn't be holding it really. So I'm not sure if the hairs would be a problem or not. I'll look into the B. smithi. I have 160 oz. plastic tubs I use for frogs, would those work good for T's? I have my N. cromatus in it right now, it is still a juvie like I said. Would adults be good in these? Or would they need larger enclosures?

Edit: What size of enclosure would a B. smithi need? What people would you guys recomend me buying T's from?
 
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Spidershane1

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 11, 2010
Messages
170
Cobalts and goliaths are not considered good beginner species, but the B smithi(red knee) is a very good choice for beginners.
The avicularia(pink toe) genus is also very good for beginners. They are arboreals, so that might be cool for you, since you already have a terrestrial N chromatus.
 

Rob1985

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Arachnosupporter
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Feb 14, 2005
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865
I'd go with an Avic species... especially since beginners are not ready for the speed and aggression of an H. lividum. They WILL catch you off guard. The T. blondi can be hard to keep if you're not competent in adjusting humidity levels and the urticating hairs can be a nightmare!

I am a huge fan of the the Haplos, but whatever you choose please read up on the care of it.
 

newspidermom

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 13, 2010
Messages
57
Any of the Brachyphelma genus is a good beginner choice which includes many. Some can be more skittish and flicky than others and of course there is a price difference. The Brachyphelm Smithi (Mexican Red-Knee) is a pretty ecomical starter. I have a Brachyphelma Emilia (Mexican Red Leg) that is very calm and hardly flicks hairs at all. In fact as long as I don't spook her she'll let me stroke her rump and actually seems to like it...lol. They are a little more money tho. I also have a Brachyphelma Boehmei (Mexican Fire Leg) that flicks at me any time I get too close, and they can be a bit pricy. Just do alot of research and watch some youtube...lol. I guarantee your first won't be your last. Have fun T hunting!!
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
Thanks for all the replies guys. Since you guys dont recomend them for beginners, I wont go with H.lividum or T.blondi. Although I do really like them, I want the best for the T's and if that means I need to wait and get more experienced, then I will! So I'm thinking of the B.smithi. These were the first ones I really started to like. avicularia are pretty cool. How do I set up a aboreal set up?
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
Whats with the hair flicking thing? Can someone inform me on that. Also all the T's you guys say, if you would want to post a picture of them also that would be great. It takes forever searching all these different kinds lol.
 

Jacobchinarian

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 2, 2010
Messages
255
I got a t blondi (technically stirmi) as my first. Iv had him 7 months and he's doing great. Had a beautiful molt and everything. Go with what you like. When I was a beginner I wanted a cobalt blue also. I ended up getting a free one after I realized it was a pet hole. I made a starter burrow for her that she spent every second in. She never finished it because it filled with water molted in it but was pressed up against the glass and since she was so fragile from the molt she bleed and broke a bunch of her legs. She died a few months later. Anyway if you get one expect to feed a hole. I don't like obligate burrowers at all. Get the Goliath if you want. People exaggerate the difficulty of care. Its really not that hard.
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
594
Welcome to the site. :)

Great beginner list. These all thrive in dry conditions with a large water dish. All like to hang out in the open for me. Simple care IMO.
G. pulchra
G. pulchripes
B. smithi
B. emilia
C. cyaneopubescens < A bit skittish but a great display, heavy webber, fast growing and good eater.


I get alot of my Ts from Paulatpetcenterusa.net Also check out kenthebugguy.com :) You can also check the classifieds here on the boards. There are alot of regular people buying, selling and trading.
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
Thanks for the list. What do you mean by thrive in dry conditions? What substrate do you use for them? For my N.cromatus I'm using coco fiber, and misting it like once a week. It is a plastic tub with plastic llid so holds moisture pretty well.
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
594
Thanks for the list. What do you mean by thrive in dry conditions? What substrate do you use for them? For my N.cromatus I'm using coco fiber, and misting it like once a week. It is a plastic tub with plastic llid so holds moisture pretty well.
Well for example B. smithi does fine at low humidity with lots of ventilation. No misting needed just a water dish to drink from. Theraphosa blondi would not thrive well in dry conditions and probably die from molting complications, dehydration or stress. They are from a hot humid climate. Its harder to maintain that high humidity(85-95% at 80-85 deg) without proper (reduced but optimal) ventilation and misting. B. smithi can be kept in low temperatures and humidity without stress. They are much more hardy. This is just a typical example and different spieces will have different climates and care.

Edit: I use 100% peat moss from the local hardware store. It has beneficial springtails that clean the cage. High acidity to prevent mold. 10$ for 10 lbs. Coco fiber works well but can be costly and doesnt hold burrows well.
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
Well I'm pretty sure I wont have a problem keeping up humidity if I need to becasue I keep poison dart frogs, and they need it VERY humid lol. What size enclosure would you recomend for a B.smithi? I have 160 oz. containers, would one be okay in there? Or would it need a larger enclosure? As for ventilation, would just taking the lid off to feed/mist/ect. be okay? The 160 oz. containers have plastic lid with no ventilation... Or would I be better off with a criter keeper with a screen lid?
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
594
Well I'm pretty sure I wont have a problem keeping up humidity if I need to becasue I keep poison dart frogs, and they need it VERY humid lol. What size enclosure would you recomend for a B.smithi? I have 160 oz. containers, would one be okay in there? Or would it need a larger enclosure? As for ventilation, would just taking the lid off to feed/mist/ect. be okay? The 160 oz. containers have plastic lid with no ventilation... Or would I be better off with a criter keeper with a screen lid?
What are the demensions of the container? Yes it needs ventilation for air circulation. Cut some holes and hot glue some fine metal screen over the holes.

I would put an adult B. smithi in a 5 or 10 gallon tank. You can also buy them as spiderlings and use deli cups to raise them, keep that in mind as its most rewarding in the long run. :)
 

heatfreakk3

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
8
The container is a circular plastic tub, with the diameter of 8.5 inches. I have my juvie N.cromatus in it fine, but would an adult of any T be good in that? Or would it be too small. I totaly agree raising them up is awesome! But I just want a dang adult, or at least a little big one lol.
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 30, 2010
Messages
594
The container is a circular plastic tub, with the diameter of 8.5 inches. I have my juvie N.cromatus in it fine, but would an adult of any T be good in that? Or would it be too small. I totaly agree raising them up is awesome! But I just want a dang adult, or at least a little big one lol.
The general rule of thumb for a terrestial would to be 2 leg spans wide and 3 leg spans long. B. smithi gets around 6" DLS (Diagnal leg span). You can also put them in shoe boxes 7"x12"x4"h. People that keep alot of terrestirals keep them this way successfully, as long as there is ventilation.
 
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