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Trenor

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I also tried to keep all my slings warmer by keeping them in a bathroom that gets warmer than the rest of the house. I lost a few to dehydration. I've since ditched keeping slings warmer than 74F.
This is why I always give all my slings a water dish and make sure their substrate is moist. My whole reptile/T room stays around 78-80 degrees all the time mainly for the reptiles. I almost lost a N.incei sling when it kicked his water dish over and I didn't notice it behind one of the other N.incei enclosures. Since then I make it a point to check the at least every other day to make sure they have water even if it's not a feeding day.

It was tricky finding water dishes for the 2 oz condiment cups but the tattoo ink cups worked out really good. I got a lot off Ebay for cheap and I've been using them with good results.
 

boina

Lady of the mites
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Mine hasn't climbed the glass since it was maybe 2-2.5 inches, so that's not an option.



I've tried this and it didn't help. It just made it fall apart.
What also works is the following:

- Put a soaking wet paper towel in a tupperware box or similar
- put molt on top
- close lid tightly
- come back to it a about 24 hours later, 48 hours if you have a really large molt.

The high humidity softens the molt without disintegrating it. It just takes patience...
 

BrockiePelma

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Given that im located in SEA where its always hot, Im currently looking for ways and tricks, like substrate additive that'll make the subs retain more moisture for long periods of time, vermiculite comes to mind,but based on observation and testing,even when soaked in water for long periods of time, it doesnt seem to absorb a lot of water,plus it'll be difficult to replace the moisture it'll lose over time specially if it is mostly placed beneath the subs(which is what i plan to do)

Im also brain storming for ways to artificially 'cool' the bottom of my enclosure(from an outside part if possible) for the benefit of my fossorial types.
 

EulersK

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Given that im located in SEA where its always hot, Im currently looking for ways and tricks, like substrate additive that'll make the subs retain more moisture for long periods of time, vermiculite comes to mind,but based on observation and testing,even when soaked in water for long periods of time, it doesnt seem to absorb a lot of water,plus it'll be difficult to replace the moisture it'll lose over time specially if it is mostly placed beneath the subs(which is what i plan to do)

Im also brain storming for ways to artificially 'cool' the bottom of my enclosure(from an outside part if possible) for the benefit of my fossorial types.
Peat moss holds humidity very well, but it has a glaring downside. If you let it dry out completely (and I mean bone dry), it's neigh impossible to moisten it again very quickly. It takes literal days, if not a week, of watering little by little every day to get it back up to speed. However, for the enclosures that stay perpetually moist... why not?
 

ediblepain

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Dec 24, 2016
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One of my female G. porteri has been digging a nifty tunnel. It's cool to see how she changes it a little bit at a time over the course of weeks and months. I haven't actually seen her in it yet.. even though I am one of those weirdos that will quietly sneak into the T room at 4am with a red flashlight.
 

edesign

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Nothing special really, but I decided to keep thorough growth/molt records of my currently 0.75" Lasiodora parahybana sling. With all the rumors surrounding how fast/big they go but finding very little evidence to back it up (i.e. the elusive 10" LP or growing half that size in the first year) I figured it'd be a fun little pet project. And if it proves to be interesting enough, maybe I'll get some more slings to keep records on, and play a little with the variables. :)
Dig back to 2004, my 3/4" Lp that I still have hit 6" in a year. I might even have old photos with date taken info on my computer...somewhere, tens of thousands of photos stored on it ha. My newest is at 3" or so after a year but it's colder in my new place in the winter (Colorado vs Louisiana) so for five months molts become somewhat rare in my invert room.
 

johnny quango

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Peat moss holds humidity very well, but it has a glaring downside. If you let it dry out completely (and I mean bone dry), it's neigh impossible to moisten it again very quickly. It takes literal days, if not a week, of watering little by little every day to get it back up to speed. However, for the enclosures that stay perpetually moist... why not?
This is something I thought about in the past but I came to the conclusion if I need to maintain the humidity levels then I may as well continue with coco fibre.

I did think about experimenting with spagnum moss by blitzing it in a food processor and mixing a few spoonfuls in the substrate on one corner just to see if it as any effect and if not I just remove the part that's mixed and replace with fresh substrate
 

EulersK

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This is something I thought about in the past but I came to the conclusion if I need to maintain the humidity levels then I may as well continue with coco fibre.

I did think about experimenting with spagnum moss by blitzing it in a food processor and mixing a few spoonfuls in the substrate on one corner just to see if it as any effect and if not I just remove the part that's mixed and replace with fresh substrate
You can buy bags of it already ground up at most hardware stores. It's only about $10 for 4 cubic feet.
 

14pokies

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I'm working on fitting 70+ Tarantulas three of which look like they are going drop a sac at any moment plus all of there enclosures into a Toyota Avalon for a 1,900 mile ride to upstate New York :rage:
 

Trenor

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I'm working on fitting 70+ Tarantulas three of which look like they are going drop a sac at any moment plus all of there enclosures into a Toyota Avalon for a 1,900 mile ride to upstate New York :rage:
Well that doesn't sound awesome at all man.
 

johnny quango

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You can buy bags of it already ground up at most hardware stores. It's only about $10 for 4 cubic feet.
I'll have to keep my eyes open for it over here as I can't remember ever seeing it. Thanks for the tip
 

EulersK

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So, I've got another one. I've got this (possibly unfounded) theory that perhaps setting up actual vivariums with my humid species will help my fly problem. According to the lovely people over in the insect subforum, apparently an abundance of isopods and springtails will outcompete fly larvae for food. My issue has been that there simply want enough food to maintain a healthy springtail population. Well, I'm going to experiment with housing hardy plants along with my T's. This will give isopods and springtails a constant source of food, meaning their population will stay healthy. Plus, it looks cool. Hopefully this works. My T. stirmi and E. uatuman will be the guinea pigs on this one.
 

edesign

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Springtails = thrips? I thought they were bad for plants in sufficient numbers. I get that you're using the plant as a food source but wondering how long it will live or if that's not a concern.

Can springtails spread easily (assuming my comments above are right)? I've debated them but I know thrips are not good for plants and I've got too many plants to want to introduce a pest voluntarily. Maybe I'm in left field lol
 

EulersK

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Springtails = thrips? I thought they were bad for plants in sufficient numbers.
No, thrips can fly, springtails can't. Thrips feed on living plant matter, and springtails are detrivores (meaning they only eat decaying matter). Springtails are actually beneficial because their feces and exuvia will provide fertilizer for the plant.
 

Venom1080

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want to start a viv myself. planning to start a practice viv without a tarantula. going to be putting in pothos, isopods, and whatever else i can find for free outside that doesnt eat plants or other organisms. once i get it down, i want to set up vivs for my larger Avics, cant wait. :)
 

edesign

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Ah, right on, guess I'll be adding springtails :D I hadn't researched a lot but I think the bit I did just confused me.

What decaying matter would a healthy, live plant provide? Long, stressful day, perhaps I'm missing the obvious but my brain is toast...
 

Venom1080

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Ah, right on, guess I'll be adding springtails :D I hadn't researched a lot but I think the bit I did just confused me.

What decaying matter would a healthy, live plant provide? Long, stressful day, perhaps I'm missing the obvious but my brain is toast...
wont be healthy long with me lol
seriously though, i can just add stuff from outside. isopods and millipedes seem to eat dead leaves and stuff in the substrate. seems pretty simple.
 

EulersK

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Ah, right on, guess I'll be adding springtails :D I hadn't researched a lot but I think the bit I did just confused me.

What decaying matter would a healthy, live plant provide? Long, stressful day, perhaps I'm missing the obvious but my brain is toast...
As roots grow, they shed the outer cells. Same with budding leaves. Kind of like a reptile shedding it's skin. That's a constant source of nutrition. That alone would provide enough food to sustain a small population. When you add in boluses from the tarantula and the occasional slice of mushroom for supplemental food, you've got yourself a great colony.

They love boluses. A discarded bolus turns into a shimmering ball of springtails within the hour.
 
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