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boina

Lady of the mites
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Mar 25, 2015
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The problem with vivariums is always the light. I have a viv for my Opheodrys aestivus (green snake) including plants, isopods and even a colony of Panchlora nivea roaches - the adults get eaten by the snakes. That works very well, but those snakes need light with UV to thrive anyway, so the light takes care of the plants, too. Now when my Avics get bigger I was planning to set up something similar, but that means the Avics will have to deal with a daylight lamp for 8-12 hours a day...
 

EulersK

Arachnonomicon
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Feb 22, 2013
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The problem with vivariums is always the light. I have a viv for my Opheodrys aestivus (green snake) including plants, isopods and even a colony of Panchlora nivea roaches - the adults get eaten by the snakes. That works very well, but those snakes need light with UV to thrive anyway, so the light takes care of the plants, too. Now when my Avics get bigger I was planning to set up something similar, but that means the Avics will have to deal with a daylight lamp for 8-12 hours a day...
Low light plants. I have no idea what this thing is, but every office has one of them. It's it my T room, which has blackout curtains and an overhead light that it on a max of 4 hours per day.
 

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edesign

AB FB Group Moderatr
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I think you're right. That blog is awesome. Used to read it a bit, especially the succulent entries.
 

vespers

Arachnodemon
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Aug 18, 2012
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The problem with vivariums is always the light. I have a viv for my Opheodrys aestivus (green snake) including plants, isopods and even a colony of Panchlora nivea roaches - the adults get eaten by the snakes. That works very well, but those snakes need light with UV to thrive anyway, so the light takes care of the plants, too. Now when my Avics get bigger I was planning to set up something similar, but that means the Avics will have to deal with a daylight lamp for 8-12 hours a day...
The light isn't really an issue. Tarantulas have a full day of sunlight everyday in the wild, light that is more intense than the artificial lights we provide in vivariums. They simply find a place to hide during the day of course. So as long as your T has a proper hide, it will come out at night after the lights are out. Not that much different in principle than keeping other nocturnal animals like tree frogs or some geckos in planted enclosures. Just business as usual for a night-time creature.
 
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