Hello there, why not take a few seconds to register on our forums and become part of the community? Just click here.

Male Phidippus Regius- is he an adult?

Discussion in 'Other Spiders & Arachnids' started by Noah Clark, Sep 14, 2017.

  1. Advertisement
    He chewed a decent size hole in it and climbed back inside
    What has he done
    Does this have anything to do with moulting
     
  2. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Maybe he's just doing what it looks like. Making the entrance bigger.
     
  3. Yes
    But why
     
  4. And he is once again sitting on top of the sac. Made hole to get in, sitting on sac because he wishes to moult outside of it, and since he is much larger he will use the big hole to get in so he can allow his new exoskeleton to harden?
     
  5. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    He'll not moult outside of his hammock. If he's still out tomorrow see if he'll take a fly.
     
  6. Ok, he's back inside now, and it seems the hole got bigger. Hopefully this means he is about to moult and will use the hole either as some sort of support or to get out of the sac when he finishes
     
  7. Read above, replied to wrong post
    C360_2017-09-28-15-57-42-459.jpg
     
    • Like Like x 1
  8. This spider is one strange boi
    This is the most I've seen him move for over a week
    He is just moving around in his sac
    Pulling himself out through the hole and then back in
    What is the meaning of this
     
  9. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    I'm unsure to be honest. You'll just have to keep an eye on him.
     
  10. I am so confused by this spider
    I got home and he was on the bottom of his enclosure roaming around, his sac practically destroyed
    No signs of moult anywhere, in fact he looks no different.
    I tried feeding him a small fly and a large fly. With both he delivered a quick venomless bite and walked away. They are both still alive.
    Wtf is he doing? I'm starting to worry
     
  11. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    I'm honestly unsure.
     
  12. Here he is C360_2017-09-29-15-13-35-812.jpg
     
    • Like Like x 1
  13. The Snark

    The Snark Dumpster Fire of the Gods Old Timer

    I've occasionally observed this in the jumper population that roams our porch. It's easier to spot the difference when there are several around to compare it to. I've always assumed it's the males doing the male thing, out to find romance. How they act coincides with sparring matches often taking place among the males. A noticeable change from they all are roaming-hunting and ignoring (or ambushing) each other to pairs facing off.

    On a comic note, they notify me of the change, the mating season has begun. When I go out on the porch I often walk into several abandoned safety lines draped from the eaves that the sparring males have left behind.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2017
  14. Do immature jumpers do that? He's not an adult.
     
  15. The Snark

    The Snark Dumpster Fire of the Gods Old Timer

    Purely unscientific here, I'd say yes. They aren't robots. There is no switch flipped that completely changes their behavior. Immatures could very well be 'feeling their oats' even though they aren't fully equipped.

    Call this an idiot analogy. Take a ~<yearling colt. Ready and willing to mount a mare... and completely incapable of performing once he gets up there.
     
    Last edited: Sep 29, 2017
  16. Torech Ungol

    Torech Ungol Arachnosquire Active Member

    I agree. His behavior very much sounds like he is trying and failing to build a sperm web.
     
  17. He has been sitting on the bottom all day and just wanders around. I give him food items, and what he does it stalk them, pounce on them, and then deliver a bite. Then lets go and walks away? This is hunting behaviour, but nothing he bites dies and he won't actually eat anything
     
  18. Ok he kept going at it, and he eventually held on and is now eating his mealworm. Perhaps since his fangs are so big he wasn't accurately hitting a part on the worm that would be good to inject his venom into? He attacked it 4 times, and every time it moved he went after it again. I'm glad to see him eating, I'm guessing after this meal he'll be ready to moult as his abdomen still hasn't gotten any smaller since he ate on September 14th.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  19. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    All my jumpers have either been hungry and ate or not and have either ignored the prey item or been hidden away.

    Have you tried him on flies?
     
  20. basin79

    basin79 Arachnoemperor Active Member

    Fantastic. I didn't see this post as I had your other post opened and had to let Typhon out.

    Really, really chuffed for the 2 of you.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.