Haplopelma Lividium

krucz36

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okay, just on't let anyone else see it...it's a masterwork.
if you can't tell, that's a nylon over my head in Figure 2.
 

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AlbinoDragon829

Arachnobaron
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Originally posted by krucz36
ahh! turncoat!
heh heh
arachnophiliac.com has some good stuff too.
we should kidnap wade and force him to write encyclopedic caresheets for every animal in the world.
i've got some rope, anyone got an old Dodge van we can use?

*evil grin*
The funny part about it all is that I do drive a kind of old dodge van... lol. We're part way there :D
 

Immortal_sin

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ok...for caring for my Usambaras..I keep them on bone dry peat moss, large water dish, full ventilation, and about 1/2 substrate to the top of the enclosure. Mine can't decide whether she is arboreal or not, she cleans house about every 6 months and switches locations!
She is the one that just had the babies.
The other female is a burrow all the way. She is currently in a state of matrimonial bliss, sharing her burrow with the male. At night, they like to hang out upside down hanging from the underside of the lid.
 

Weapon-X

Arachnodemon
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re

those have to be some of the most awesome setups i've ever seen for burrowers, now i'll be on the look out for some containers for one for my camaroon red and one for my 8 inch king baboon, by the way would you recomend any certain size for the larger species like king baboons and goliath birdeaters, i cannot say how impressing those setups are!;P =D ;P
 

AlbinoDragon829

Arachnobaron
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Originally posted by Immortal_sin
ok...for caring for my Usambaras..I keep them on bone dry peat moss, large water dish, full ventilation, and about 1/2 substrate to the top of the enclosure. Mine can't decide whether she is arboreal or not, she cleans house about every 6 months and switches locations!
She is the one that just had the babies.
The other female is a burrow all the way. She is currently in a state of matrimonial bliss, sharing her burrow with the male. At night, they like to hang out upside down hanging from the underside of the lid.
That's neat. So the top for the cage has full ventilation? Hmm.. Never considered that. How do you heat the usumbara's tank? (or do you at all)
 

MrDeranged

He Who Rules
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I don't heat mine at all. They're just fine at room temperature. Well, as long as RT is between 70 and 85 :) Normally in my house it's in the upper 70's for most of the day.

Scott
 

Wade

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Originally posted by krucz36
okay, just on't let anyone else see it...it's a masterwork.
if you can't tell, that's a nylon over my head in Figure 2.

Wow, we can always count on Garth for a quick and amusing graphic! I'm not sure weather to be flattered or frightened :eek: but since I know MY dodge van wouldn't make it accross the country, I'm not too worried :) I notice King Looey was more than willing to jump in and help with violence. Lucky for me, he's in England. Whew!

I pretty much keep mine exactly how Holley described. These are tough little critters, I wouldn't be surprised if they'd do fine in a dry cage without substrate and without a water bowl! (mine do have those ameneties, however).

On the name confusion issue, I'd like to squeeze in a little plug for the ATS. The American Arachnological Society (different group) has a committee that compiles an "official" common names list for Arachnids. This list is available as a free download at atshq.org and the tarantula and scorpion portion is printed in each issue of the Forum magazine. The idea of an official common name may seem silly to many folks, but it would be helpful if we were all using the same names! Also, common names aren't dominated by the sometimes complex rules of scietific names, so they should stay the same during the various taxonomic upheavals the scientific ones go through.

The official common name for P. murinus is Mombasa golden starburst tarantula. They generally avoid generic and confusing names like "baboon", the only common name that has that word is "king baboon tarantula". The list doesn't include ALL the tarantulas in the trade, but most of the common ones are there. The AAS doesn't assign common names to tarantulas that are rare or of dubious taxonomy. At present, "Usambara" is sort of in limbo. It can't have an official common name until it has an official scientific one.

Richard Gallon is the taxonomist who working on revising Pterinochilus, and it's supposed to be published soon. Word in the street has it that "Usambara" will turn out to be a color morph of P. murinus, and many dealers are already calling them this on their pricelists. I've heard that there's some rumblings of disagreement about this decision however. Some say that the golden and red morphs cannot be bred together, indicating different species. I don't know if there's any truth to this however.

Wade
 

krucz36

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did i tell you? wade rocks.
i promise never to plot to kidnap you again. though, as you can tell by my plan, you're probably safe either way...
 

AlbinoDragon829

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Originally posted by Wade
Wow, we can always count on Garth for a quick and amusing graphic! I'm not sure weather to be flattered or frightened :eek: but since I know MY dodge van wouldn't make it accross the country, I'm not too worried :) I notice King Looey was more than willing to jump in and help with violence. Lucky for me, he's in England. Whew!

I pretty much keep mine exactly how Holley described. These are tough little critters, I wouldn't be surprised if they'd do fine in a dry cage without substrate and without a water bowl! (mine do have those ameneties, however).

On the name confusion issue, I'd like to squeeze in a little plug for the ATS. The American Arachnological Society (different group) has a committee that compiles an "official" common names list for Arachnids. This list is available as a free download at atshq.org and the tarantula and scorpion portion is printed in each issue of the Forum magazine. The idea of an official common name may seem silly to many folks, but it would be helpful if we were all using the same names! Also, common names aren't dominated by the sometimes complex rules of scietific names, so they should stay the same during the various taxonomic upheavals the scientific ones go through.

The official common name for P. murinus is Mombasa golden starburst tarantula. They generally avoid generic and confusing names like "baboon", the only common name that has that word is "king baboon tarantula". The list doesn't include ALL the tarantulas in the trade, but most of the common ones are there. The AAS doesn't assign common names to tarantulas that are rare or of dubious taxonomy. At present, "Usambara" is sort of in limbo. It can't have an official common name until it has an official scientific one.

Richard Gallon is the taxonomist who working on revising Pterinochilus, and it's supposed to be published soon. Word in the street has it that "Usambara" will turn out to be a color morph of P. murinus, and many dealers are already calling them this on their pricelists. I've heard that there's some rumblings of disagreement about this decision however. Some say that the golden and red morphs cannot be bred together, indicating different species. I don't know if there's any truth to this however.

Wade
Holy sh*t dude, your info kicks major ass. Keep up the good work! I can see why you are up for kidnapping!
 

VolkervonWirth

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Originally posted by Wade
Richard Gallon is the taxonomist who working on revising Pterinochilus, and it's supposed to be published soon. Word in the street has it that "Usambara" will turn out to be a color morph of P. murinus, and many dealers are already calling them this on their pricelists. I've heard that there's some rumblings of disagreement about this decision however. Some say that the golden and red morphs cannot be bred together, indicating different species. I don't know if there's any truth to this however.
Hi,

Richard Gallon published his Revision about the Genus Pterinochilus and Eucratoscelus before some Weeks ago. The Reference is:
Gallon, R. (2002): Revision of the african genera Pterinochilus and Eucratoscelus (Aranea, Theraphosidae, Harpactirinae) with description of two new genera. Bull. Br. arachnol. Soc. 12, (5): 201 - 232

Within this Revision, Richard synonymised Pterinochilus mamillatus with Pterinochilus murinus.My "special" friend Dr. Schmidt "identified" the "usambara" as belonging to the Species Pterinochilus mamillatus, a species which was described by the german arachnologist Embrik Strand in 1906. Unfortunately the Holotype of this Species was destroyed during the second world war,so we only have the very bad original description.For Schmidt, this original description was so good :-(, that he recognised the "usambara" as being a member of the Pterinochlius mamillatus Species.Now, Richard compared the "usambara" with the Holotype-Material of Pt. murinus for his Revision and he only recognised differences within the coloration of both form.The logical consequence was to synonymise both "Species".
BTW, I haven't heard of any breeding experiments between both color-types!

Cheers, Volker
 

AlbinoDragon829

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I put some time into searching for pterinochilus mamillatus, and interestingly enough I was only found german sites. I was only able to understand a little bit of it, and all of the info was controdicting and rather confusing. Like why would an usumbara be found in south africa or madagascar?!? I also found lots of other german sites on other pterinochilus species I hadn't heard of yet, and got info that said they could be found in the southern united states and another site that says you can only find them in the Czech Republic.. hmmm...? lol.
 

krucz36

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yeah, if you're not careful you can get bit by pterinochilus in the woodpile out here in california.
heh
 

AlbinoDragon829

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Originally posted by krucz36
yeah, if you're not careful you can get bit by pterinochilus in the woodpile out here in california.
heh
If it was a close encounter, I wouldn't mind as long as I could safely capture it :D
 

conipto

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Just a thought..

I'm not ready to be housing Halpopelma and the like quite yet, but with a burrow that deep and straight, do you worry about them falling down it at all? Also, for those of you having difficulty finding these containers, wouldn't it be fairly easy to make them yourselves?

Bill
 

atavuss

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Originally posted by Martin H.
hi,

I keep Haplopelma lividum and Co. in tanks like this:
Martin, what brand of containers are those? what are you making the ventilation holes with? and why the holes at the bottom, do you have the containers in another container to catch any moisture runoff from the bottom holes?
Ed
 

atavuss

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Originally posted by galeogirl
I've been looking for better ways to cage my ts, pet carriers and jars take up so much space once you have a few dozen spiders. I'm going to give this a try with a few of my burrowers and see how they do.

Galeogirl, I use mostly kritter keepers because they are stackable, I have them two and three high on shelving.....BTW, nice avatar pic!
Ed
 
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Re: Just a thought..

Originally posted by conipto
I'm not ready to be housing Halpopelma and the like quite yet, but with a burrow that deep and straight, do you worry about them falling down it at all? Also, for those of you having difficulty finding these containers, wouldn't it be fairly easy to make them yourselves?

Bill
No, there isn't much worry about them falling down. And it would be fairly easy to make the "haplopelma tanks" ourselves, but we're too lazy. (or at least I am ;) )
 

Martin H.

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.

Hello Ed,

Originally posted by atavuss

Martin, what brand of containers are those?
Originally posted by Martin H. on 10-01-2002 08:38 AM

the brand is "rotho". I buy them at "Marktkauf" or "Kaufland". But probably other big supermarket chains will have them too.

You can use any tall container, but I would recommend strait/slim containers (mine are only 10 cm wide). The advantage of a strait container is, that the chamber at the end of the burrow will be at one side of the containers "wall". => you can always look inside the burrow and check the spider. When you take a container with a larger diameter, the spider can built her burrow in the middle of the tank and you will see nothing of her and also can't check her to see if everything is allright.

Try to search for storage containers for noodles, granola, grains, cereals, etc. – these are often slim boxes.


Originally posted by atavuss

what are you making the ventilation holes with?
with a soldering iron


Originally posted by atavuss

and why the holes at the bottom, do you have the containers in another container to catch any moisture runoff from the bottom holes?
Originally posted by Martin H. on 09-30-2002 02:58 PM

I use this kind of tank (strait an tall, with holes or a grid at the top and the botton) for all of my burrowing species.
The wholes/grid at the bottom is for watering and dewatering: about two times a year I put the tanks in the bath tube and fill it with water till the level of the soil in the tanks. I let them for about one hour flooded that the soil can soak with water. While this, the spiders stay in the tanks and somtimes also under water – without any problems.
only in the first days after watering the tanks, a little bit of water is dripping out of the holes (put them on old newspaper). After one or two weeks, no more water is coming out.

regards,
Martin
 
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