Haplopelma Lividium

Martin H.

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Hi,

Originally posted by Alonso99

Where did you get the containers? They look cool
the brand is "rotho". I buy them at "Marktkauf" or "Kaufland". But probably other big supermarket chains will have them too.


Originally posted by kosh

i havent seen those containers anywhere....i wonder if you could do something similar with these Round Kritter Keeper :?
You can use any tall container, but I would recommend strait/slim containers (mine are only 10 cm wide). The advantage of a strait container is, that the chamber at the end of the burrow will be at one side of the containers "wall". => you can always look inside the burrow and check the spider. When you take a container with a larger diameter, the spider can built her burrow in the middle of the tank and you will see nothing of her and also can't check her to see if everything is allright.

Try to search for storage containers for noodles, granola, grains, cereals, etc. – these are often slim boxes.


Originally posted by Atrax

Have you noticed if any of the harder to acclimate species (like some wild caught Asians for instance) adjust better in a set up like that?
yep! Spiders gain a lot of the humidity they need by respire. Most Asian spiders come from very humid regions. When you keep them in normal tanks where they can't dig deep, they often don't settle down, are always wandering arround, try to escape, they don't accept an artificial retreat which isn't a deep burrow, when they molt they might get stuck in the exuvia, if they built eggsacks they eat them or the eggsacks drys out and they don't live long.
In these "Haplopelma-tanks" they can dig a burrow in which the humidity is perfect for them. Like I told above, I water them about twice a year. Since Volker is keeping his Asian tarantulas in these "Haplopelma-tanks" (he is doing this much longer than me) he has more success with keeping them and also breeding them regularely without the above mentioned problems.
Also wild caught spiders normally will accept the prepared burrow very quick and settle down. So you will have less problems with dehydrated WC asian spiders.

btw, I am also keeping my other burrowing spiders, like Ephebopus spp., Hysterocrates spp., etc. like this.

regards,
Martin
www.spiderpix.com

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Ephesians

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I have strongly reinforce Martin's opinion that h. lividums are not aggressive, but defensive. They are most violent after a molt...for about a month, I'm guessing because they're all fresh and new...ready to whoop some @$$. Mine will run into its hideout when disturbed, it rarely attacks. She doesn't even burrow. She has plenty of room, I don't see why she doesn't. But I bought a beautiful roughly textured ceramic cave and she just chills in that thing. She used to burrow to no end until I got that. She also isn't afraid to show herself, I think she's gotten used to my music and stuff playing, and doesn't mind the vibrations, so long as its not too loud. She'll come out night or day, the cage top is mostly wrapped in blue seran wrap to allow moisture to keep in the cage, so its pretty shaded in there. But overall, if you set up everything right and her environment is comfortable...there won't be any problems. If she does burrow against the side...like everyone else said, you can see her until she webs it up...which is inevitable. Good luck friend.

Marcus
 

galeogirl

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I've been looking for better ways to cage my ts, pet carriers and jars take up so much space once you have a few dozen spiders. I'm going to give this a try with a few of my burrowers and see how they do.

Have you tried breeding with this cage setup?
 

galeogirl

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Very nice! I think my H. albostriatum and H. lividum may be up for a change of address soon. :)
 

Botar

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Originally posted by galeogirl
I've been looking for better ways to cage my ts, pet carriers and jars take up so much space once you have a few dozen spiders. I'm going to give this a try with a few of my burrowers and see how they do.

Galeogirl,

Let me know if you find similar containers. All I've been able to locate so far are opaque cereal storage containers.

Botar
 

galeogirl

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Botar,

I'll let you know. I went out looking the other day but didn't find anything that I quite liked. I'm going to try a few other stores out next week. I'd love to see what my Usambar and my Haplopelmas would do in those containers.
 

AlbinoDragon829

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Galeogirl,
In your last post, I noticed that you have an usumbara. Are you familiar with sunburst baboon tarantulas? Usumbaras and sunburst are both from ptero-something (not exactly what the species scientific name is), and I have heard that the sunburst is a phase of the usumbara. Also, some people classify the sunburst an starbursts as the same? Is the sunburst a phase of the usumbara?
 

Code Monkey

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Originally posted by AlbinoDragon829
Galeogirl,
In your last post, I noticed that you have an usumbara. Are you familiar with sunburst baboon tarantulas? Usumbaras and sunburst are both from ptero-something (not exactly what the species scientific name is), and I have heard that the sunburst is a phase of the usumbara. Also, some people classify the sunburst an starbursts as the same? Is the sunburst a phase of the usumbara?
Not quite right. Usambara (or Usumbara depending on who's doing the typing - need to check a Atlas) is a sunburst baboon... Different common names for the same exact spider. It is a Pterinochilus species and is more or less officially declared to be a color phase of P. murinus, however there is some dissent on that pigeon holing. Rick West lists it as a color variant on his web page for what that is worth to you.

EDIT: To clarify, there is no such thing as an Usambara as a species. By anyone who identified to a species, it has always been a color variant of P. murinus. Some people have basically decided on their own they didn't like lumping the bitey orange things with the rather drab P. murinus, so it has often been listed as just "Pterinochius species (Usambara)". I don't know of any good reasons for this, however; if anyone knows of a justification, hey, I'd like to know :)
 
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AlbinoDragon829

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Originally posted by Code Monkey
Not quite right. Usambara (or Usumbara depending on who's doing the typing - need to check a Atlas) is a sunburst baboon... Different common names for the same exact spider. It is a Pterinochilus species and is more or less officially declared to be a color phase of P. murinus, however there is some dissent on that pigeon holing.
Thanks! Very helpful info. Do you know at what point of the T's life that it is in this phase (beginning or later on)?
 

LaRiz

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Usambura

Usambura is a region in Africa where a species of Pterinochilus is found. It seems that, at first, this species was thought to be a color form of Pterinochilus murinus, or perhaps a subspecies.
Some suspect that it may be a totally different species. That's still in the works, from what I understand. Pterinochilus species "Usambura" are noted to be a smaller than that of P. murinus, more opportunistic in choosing den sites and, of course, a splendid orange coloration. I have a friend that has an adult female that chose to live an arboreal lifestyle.
Hope this clears it up alittle.
john
 

AlbinoDragon829

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Re: Usambura

Originally posted by LaRiz
Usambura is a region in Africa where a species of Pterinochilus is found. It seems that, at first, this species was thought to be a color form of Pterinochilus murinus, or perhaps a subspecies.
Some suspect that it may be a totally different species. That's still in the works, from what I understand. Pterinochilus species "Usambura" are noted to be a smaller than that of P. murinus, more opportunistic in choosing den sites and, of course, a splendid orange coloration. I have a friend that has an adult female that chose to live an arboreal lifestyle.
Hope this clears it up alittle.
john
Yeah, that does clear up a few things, but I wonder why there is so much controversy about it.. So you're saying that the "sunbursts" are bigger than the "usumbaras"? From your description in the above quote, I gather that a sunburst would be a better choice perhaps? Any elaboration on that point?
 

krucz36

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john: Pterinochilus murinus is the "mombassa starburst", right?
personally, from the animals i've run into, you're lucky if you can tell most pterinochilus apart. unless you've got an electron microscope and know what you're looking for. i've got the P. meridionalis and P. murinius...and an H. maculata that looks reall really similar to the rest of them...sigh
 

Code Monkey

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Originally posted by AlbinoDragon829
Thanks! Very helpful info. Do you know at what point of the T's life that it is in this phase (beginning or later on)?
When you hear 'phase', they're not talking 'phases of the moon' kind of phase, but rather like blondes or brunettes, or black and white people - it's a genetically determined color phase (or morph). In this case, from the Usambara Mountain range. As with many animals, it's not uncommon for geographically separated groups to have inconsequential differences like coloration but they are still the same species.
 

Code Monkey

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Re: Re: Usambura

Originally posted by AlbinoDragon829
Yeah, that does clear up a few things, but I wonder why there is so much controversy about it.. So you're saying that the "sunbursts" are bigger than the "usumbaras"? From your description in the above quote, I gather that a sunburst would be a better choice perhaps? Any elaboration on that point?
Actually, probably not because they're harder to find - the standard P. murinus is kind of a dull sandy color. Hence, the pet trade is filled with the bright orange bitey ones and not so many of the dull tan bitey ones. Different species or not, their care and habit is the same, so might as well get the better looking one ;)
 

krucz36

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Hell, CM, any of 'em are bitey if you treat 'em right. just like a woman!
ack, i didn't say that.
 

AlbinoDragon829

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P. Murinus

Allright, well I am considering buying a P. Murinus soon, but after long research and the like on the internet, I haven't found any suitable SPECIFIC information on their care and setup of their cage. All I hear is set it up just like this or just like that, so how do you recommend that I set P. Murinus' cage up and what kinds of things should I put in it's cage?
 

krucz36

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here's a caresheet tho of course they have their own ideas. personally don't care much for vermiculite, but some folk like it!
of course, there's one resource yer kind of overlooking...arachnopets!
here's scott's caresheet. if you notice, they prescribe a low, wide enclosure, moderate heat, moderate humidity, and a diggable substrate, with standard invert prey. i'd wager that a Pterinochilus of any variety is something you'd want to keep your little tootsies clear of, too.
hope that helps, AD
 

AlbinoDragon829

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The first caresheet was helpful. I had already read the one on arachnopets, but I like the first one you gave better.
 

krucz36

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ahh! turncoat!
heh heh
arachnophiliac.com has some good stuff too.
we should kidnap wade and force him to write encyclopedic caresheets for every animal in the world.
i've got some rope, anyone got an old Dodge van we can use?

*evil grin*
 
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