From Bad to Worse: Herniated Booklung...Suggestions? (Pics Inside)

Chris_Skeleton

Arachnoprince
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Now, just to clarify - I didn't say it would "prove" anything, but I do believe that if a T can act normally with an injury like that, it would demonstrate that it is not in pain - which it should be if it could feel what we would call "pain." The opposite is not true at all though, if it doesn't act normally, it doesn't mean that it is in "pain" - it could be due to a lot of other things relating to the injury.
I act normally when I'm in pain all the time, does that mean I am not in pain? No. Likewise if i dont act normal, does that mean I'm in pain? No. I fail to see your logic. You also don't know how painful that is, because if they do in fact feel pain, then how would you know what constitutes how painful something is?

On topic, hope it pulls through for you Will. Good luck.
 

Travis K

TravIsGinger
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Let's take a closer look...



To me, and I am going off of your photos - which are pretty decent, it appears that the book lung is still in tact and attached to the exuvea. It also appears that something is/was not right with it previous to molting. Am I the only one that sees that the book lung is still attached?
 

xhexdx

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How certain are you that this is the case, Travis?

It's obvious that something isn't right, but I personally am not experienced enough with this sort of thing to say that the book lung is attached to the exuvia. (;))
 

Travis K

TravIsGinger
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How certain are you that this is the case, Travis?

It's obvious that something isn't right, but I personally am not experienced enough with this sort of thing to say that the book lung is attached to the exuvia. (;))
I am not certain as I do not have the molt. I am simply stating that to me it appears the book lung was abnormal prior to molting or the the new book lung tissue came out with the old tissue as if the new and old exo layers did not separate.

OP, can you examine the exuvea a little closer and report back to us?
 

KoriTamashii

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I am not certain as I do not have the molt. I am simply stating that to me it appears the book lung was abnormal prior to molting or the the new book lung tissue came out with the old tissue as if the new and old exo layers did not separate.

OP, can you examine the exuvea a little closer and report back to us?
What our friend was trying to do was point out that it's exuvia.

And though I have nothing to offer in terms of advice, I am also keeping my fingers crossed. :)
 

flamesbane

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I am not certain as I do not have the molt. I am simply stating that to me it appears the book lung was abnormal prior to molting or the the new book lung tissue came out with the old tissue as if the new and old exo layers did not separate.

OP, can you examine the exuvea a little closer and report back to us?
The exuvia is really too dry to see much at this point, and I am trying to preserve it. However if you look at this picture:



You can see that the bottom of the slit opening of the booklung cover is still in tact, as well as the membrane (not the orange spot, but rather the clear material) that one would expect to see covering the opening.
 

Travis K

TravIsGinger
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To me, and I am going off of your photos - which are pretty decent, it appears that the book lung is still in tact and attached to the exuvea. It also appears that something is/was not right with it previous to molting. Am I the only one that sees that the book lung is still attached?
The exuvia is really too dry to see much at this point, and I am trying to preserve it. However if you look at this picture:
You can see that the bottom of the slit opening of the booklung cover is still in tact, as well as the membrane (not the orange spot, but rather the clear material) that one would expect to see covering the opening.
But what about what appears to be a brown nastified Book Lung we see attached to the exuvia? It will still be there, can you get closer pics and/or from different angles?

Cheers,
 
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MadTitan

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May 13, 2007
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I agree :razz: As I said, it clearly would demonstrate something (j/k Fran - playing on English not being your first language).

Now, just to clarify - I didn't say it would "prove" anything, but I do believe that if a T can act normally with an injury like that, it would demonstrate that it is not in pain - which it should be if it could feel what we would call "pain." The opposite is not true at all though, if it doesn't act normally, it doesn't mean that it is in "pain" - it could be due to a lot of other things relating to the injury.
A lot of animals will act like they are not in pain or injured if they think a predator is watching. Looking injured, when you are injured, is not a survival trait. Looking strong is. If anyone has done any observations or studies on this regarding tarantulas, I should very much like to see it - in it's own thread perhaps.

Best wishes for the lividum. I had an B.emilia with a herniated book lung. He survived through a couple molts, matured, and eventually died of being old and male. The lung never got better though. This B.emilia had problems every molt, even before the herniation, and would not have survived without multiple interventions. I thought it safest to keep him out of the gene pool.
 

pato_chacoana

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To me it looks like the spider couldn't molt that book lung. The book lung was torn inside out as a result. Pretty nasty...
 
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