First Centipede Thoughts?

Sleazoid

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Jul 18, 2010
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I am looking into taking the plunge and getting a centipede. They somewhat freak me out, but I won't be handling them and I do find them very beautiful above everything else. Any good large/hardy species you guys can recommend? I like a lot of the Scolopendra species but I don't really know too much about them and the differences of them, I am going to research more before I buy of course, I was just hoping you guys could give me some pointers. Oh and I also would like to know everyones thoughts on Rhysida celeries andina. I hope that is the correct scientific name for it.
 

Chilobrachys

Arachnoknight
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Aug 7, 2008
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Get an E. trigo. It was my first and only and I've had the little guy for 3 years now, they seem pretty easy to take care of. Mine has a bit of an attitude, not like subspinipes or anything like that, but nevertheless it is a pretty entertaining species.
 

dannyboypede

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As a first pede, I would recommend something hardy. Most U.S. species are easy to care for. These include Scolopendra heros, Scolopendra alternans (FL), and Scolopendra polymorpha (also viridis, but I know nothing about them). alternans is mean and has a very potent, not deadly, but potent venom. Scolopendra heros and polymorpha are nicer IME. A lot of times subspinipes spp. are imports and can hold disease and/or mites. I don't have an alternans yet, but I hear they are essentially bullet proof. If you want something big, go with alternans or heros. If you want something small and boring, go with polymorpha:wall:.
Just my 0.2,
Dan;)
 

dannyboypede

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get a chinese red head centipede that was my first centipede and it's awsome
I got one as my first centipede and it had a deformed spiracle that killed it within a week...so maybe start with a U.S. species. I was almost turned away from pedes completely when that happened. Play it safe with something hardy and proven like alternans or heros. I agree, they are awesome, but they are kind of risky. I have to admit, I have one now and it is mean. They look fake!!
Just my 0.2,
Dan;)
 

Elytra and Antenna

Arachnoking
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A beginner should avoid early instar babies because there is usually some die off and avoid imports because it's common to get a mortally damaged specimen, but the exact species isn't important.
 

Sleazoid

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A beginner should avoid early instar babies because there is usually some die off and avoid imports because it's common to get a mortally damaged specimen, but the exact species isn't important.
Would a Scolopendra heros castaneiceps captive bred, 2" be fine?
 

dannyboypede

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I have a 2.5" Scolopendra heros arizonensis, and he is doing very well. I think he is in pre-molt right now, cause usually he eats just about anything, but he just recently stopped. If it were me, I would probably get something bigger, just to be safe...and because big centipedes are...bigger, and that is cool:razz:! That is just me...

--Dan:cool:
 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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Just my bias, but how 'bout Alipes grandieri...manageable size for a 1st timer, great defense display, minimal enclosure size, hardy, hungry & visible(mine are, anyway).
 

Sleazoid

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I just looked at some pictures, even though I would like a Scolopendra species, any would be fine as long as they are good for beginners. Even though I feel confident around my snakes and tarantulas. I know literally nothing about centipedes so I think not jumping into something like a Scolopendra would be smart on my part, since I am not used to the way they act or move. Even if I do not intend to handle it there may come a time where I may have to know how they are going to act in certain situations.

One of the weird things I see about this species is the tail? Is that what you would call it? It looks like it has feathers attached on the end of it. That is something I haven't seen in other species yet.

 

zonbonzovi

Creeping beneath you
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One of the weird things I see about this species is the tail? Is that what you would call it? It looks like it has feathers attached on the end of it. That is something I haven't seen in other species yet.

Final legs, terminals, etc. There's a nifty anatomy sticky at the top of the Myriapods subforum. Those feather-like extensions are part of the terminal legs for this genus. When the centipede is irked, it will wave them back and forth rapidly, creating a kind of stridulating effect that can be heard. Been meaning to make a video...
 

micheldied

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I just looked at some pictures, even though I would like a Scolopendra species, any would be fine as long as they are good for beginners. Even though I feel confident around my snakes and tarantulas. I know literally nothing about centipedes so I think not jumping into something like a Scolopendra would be smart on my part, since I am not used to the way they act or move. Even if I do not intend to handle it there may come a time where I may have to know how they are going to act in certain situations.
You'll never know until you try.
Don't take other people's accounts, because every situation is different, and pedes can all act very differently.
 

CAK

Arachnoknight
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Nov 17, 2009
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I'm with Sleazoid... Centipedes have been catching my curiosity. Now, midwest house centipedes turn a 36 year old fat ass into a screeching 3rd grade girl! But these other genus pedes are really catching my curiosity. Like Sleazoid, I know NOTHING about them. I have over 100 T's in my collection. Now, I can't explain it other than a Morbid Curiosity and Fascination with some of these pedes.

There are stickies all over the place in the Tarantula forum for new folks, but there just isn't much here for the Pede world.

I think I have some ideas of beginner species, but I have no idea how they are to be kept and what the pede thrives in for environment.

Can someone link me to a thread that might help? All I see in searching is random one off questions for new pede owners.

Much Thanks in Advance!

Joe - CAK
 

crashergs

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Joe,

I don't think a beginner pede would apply to you. You obviously know the hobby, you understand the fundamentals of keeping your animals in top condition. Having said that, I think at this point with your experience, you can get any pede you want and house him with successful results.

Do note, I would assume a tarantula's behavior is almost predictable, a centipede are kinda not, they are fast and nimble. That's probably the only thing you would have to accustom yourself to.
 

CAK

Arachnoknight
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Joe,

I don't think a beginner pede would apply to you. You obviously know the hobby, you understand the fundamentals of keeping your animals in top condition. Having said that, I think at this point with your experience, you can get any pede you want and house him with successful results.

Do note, I would assume a tarantula's behavior is almost predictable, a centipede are kinda not, they are fast and nimble. That's probably the only thing you would have to accustom yourself to.
Thats awesome! I have a room that is kept about 78 degrees and between 68 and 75% humidity. Would a 2.5 gallon horizontal aquarium with coco coir, water dish and some cork bark suit for most pedes?

Also, can someone give me some examples of the attainable "holy grails" of pedes? Everyone knows the Holy Grail of the tarantula world when you start talking P.metallica / M.balfouri etc....

And YOU BET, Tarantulas are for the most part very predictable. I know if I posted that statement on the Tarantula side of the house, some of the blood thirsty hounds will hide behind their monitor and string me from post to post for my vast error in my statement because "billy had a G.rosea that would let him pet his belly and then one day it twitched twice and billy was passed out with his nose being chewed off by this viscious unpredictable BEAST!" :barf:
 

crashergs

Arachnobaron
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I believe about the only holy grails of pedes would be the s. gigantea and the viridicornis, of course there's personal preferences of holy grails for many individuals but those are the two universal pedes. My personal holy grail is the Geophilus electricus which exhibits bioluminescence.

But yeah, your conditions are about right for most pedes and you can probably manipulate a specific pedes habitat quite easily with that temperature of yours. I have seen setups where pede's are put in the same type of small cup/lid like enclosures of that you would use a scorp/spider for and put in their closets.

Thats awesome! I have a room that is kept about 78 degrees and between 68 and 75% humidity. Would a 2.5 gallon horizontal aquarium with coco coir, water dish and some cork bark suit for most pedes?

Also, can someone give me some examples of the attainable "holy grails" of pedes? Everyone knows the Holy Grail of the tarantula world when you start talking P.metallica / M.balfouri etc....

And YOU BET, Tarantulas are for the most part very predictable. I know if I posted that statement on the Tarantula side of the house, some of the blood thirsty hounds will hide behind their monitor and string me from post to post for my vast error in my statement because "billy had a G.rosea that would let him pet his belly and then one day it twitched twice and billy was passed out with his nose being chewed off by this viscious unpredictable BEAST!" :barf:
 

dannyboypede

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Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
142
Thats awesome! I have a room that is kept about 78 degrees and between 68 and 75% humidity. Would a 2.5 gallon horizontal aquarium with coco coir, water dish and some cork bark suit for most pedes?

Also, can someone give me some examples of the attainable "holy grails" of pedes? Everyone knows the Holy Grail of the tarantula world when you start talking P.metallica / M.balfouri etc....

And YOU BET, Tarantulas are for the most part very predictable. I know if I posted that statement on the Tarantula side of the house, some of the blood thirsty hounds will hide behind their monitor and string me from post to post for my vast error in my statement because "billy had a G.rosea that would let him pet his belly and then one day it twitched twice and billy was passed out with his nose being chewed off by this viscious unpredictable BEAST!" :barf:
Scolopendra hardwikei (sp?, I think that's right)
Scolopendra gigantea
Scolopendra sp. Malaysian Jewel
...those are the only holy grails I can think of. At least those are the attainable ones...it's hard to do, but you *can* get them in the US.

What you have could probably work with most pedes. As long as the centipede isn't too big and can climb out of the enclosure. At that humidity, just overflow the water dish some.
Centipedes are a lot of fun, and I think would be easier to deal with than an angry pokie or OW T. Pokies can climb glass...fast. I have never seen a centipede climb a smooth surface (thankfully).:D

--Dan
 
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