Experiences with and care for the genus Megaphobema

Benurmanii

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Hey all, after doing some asking and research, I've decided that if I get some tarantulas again, they will likely be the species from the genus Megaphobema, as the only space I have for any new T's would be near my plants, which live in a room that experiences highland temperatures for most of the year.

From what I have gathered, these T's like like humidity, soil moister than most other T's would prefer, deep substrate for burrowing, and cool temps (I've read everything from 55 at night to 80 at day). Since during the coldest point of winter, my night temps can occasionally drop lower than the low 50s, I will try to provide an enclosure with deep substrate, in hopes that the burrow may provide some insulation.

Does anybody have info on the temperament of these species? The most temperamental species I have ever kept was E. murinus, but that was 7 years ago, and it was a mature male when I purchased it, so it did not stick around very long (or it had parasites, as its health declined and its abdomen started to constantly decrease in size at a certain point).

All help is appreciated, even if the advice is that I should not keep these species, if they are more of an expert's T.
 

Venom1080

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theyre a intermediate T IMO. not to tough to keep, they like deep moist substrate, as much as you can give them. my M robustum has burrowed more than any other spider i own. and its only 3".. i keep them at the same temps as all my other Ts, 70-78. they like to try to rub hairs on you and are skittish but not very defensive. i dont know much about the cold temperatures, ive never kept mine very chilly.
 

Benurmanii

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From an old thread I was reading, someone was adamant that the appropriate temperatures were cooler, as they claimed in nature, their extremely deep burrows are much cooler than the surrounding air temps. Hmm, perhaps if my temps seem to stress them out, I could use my second basement hobby room to house them, where temps are still in the 60s, but does not really drop at night.
 

Venom1080

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From an old thread I was reading, someone was adamant that the appropriate temperatures were cooler, as they claimed in nature, their extremely deep burrows are much cooler than the surrounding air temps. Hmm, perhaps if my temps seem to stress them out, I could use my second basement hobby room to house them, where temps are still in the 60s, but does not really drop at night.
ive heard much the same, yet mine seems to do great at normal temps. i wouldnt go below 60 personally, thats just too cold for me.
 

cold blood

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From an old thread I was reading, someone was adamant that the appropriate temperatures were cooler, as they claimed in nature, their extremely deep burrows are much cooler than the surrounding air temps. Hmm, perhaps if my temps seem to stress them out, I could use my second basement hobby room to house them, where temps are still in the 60s, but does not really drop at night.
I think you're referring to M. mesomelas.
 

Benurmanii

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vespers

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I've never kept M. robustum at any special temps. Just room temperature, with moist substrate...no issues.
 

boina

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Well, my robustum is a pet hole, but both my juvenile mesomelas are out every evening. They also become more active at lower temps, like in winter (65 to 72) and retreat more into their burrows in summer, when my living room gets warmer. They are among my absolute favorites and I can highly recommend them - but they are also the most expensive Ts I own...

Btw, there are some Pamphobeteus that really like lower temps as well.
 

Benurmanii

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Well, there's no other option than to put your bed in the Highland temps, and put your T's in your bedroom :D
Haha, I have considered this! Fortunately for me, I enjoy sleeping cool, and my plants will eat any monsters that come out after dark :p
 

vespers

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My issue is that the only places I have room for Ts have highland temps.
The highest temps my M. robustum gets are maybe 75-77 at times in the summer, and the lowest are an occasional winter day down to 68.
There are some care myths in this hobby from the past that have finally been debunked in the past few years, like Avics needing high humidity or Theraphosa needing high temps. I consider M. robustum needing cool temps to be one of those myths. I can't speak for M. mesomelas, as I have no personal experience with them.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Well, everyone knows that genus Megaphobema loves cool temperatures, ok, but I don't suggest at all to put the fridge 'chill' level on four. Two is enough, IMO.

:banghead:
 

c.h.esteban

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For M. robustum was some temperatures in the habitat measured over 4 days on different times from 6.00 am to 2.00 pm (Weinmann 2001).
On ground surface 23,0 - 34,4 °C and 30 cm into the burrow 24,0 - 25,2 °C.

For M. velvetosoma there were similar data 25, 3 - 25,7 °C (average inside the burrow).

Based on this, you can decide if these 2 Megaphobema species are a good choice for your room.
 

Benurmanii

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For M. robustum was some temperatures in the habitat measured over 4 days on different times from 6.00 am to 2.00 pm (Weinmann 2001).
On ground surface 23,0 - 34,4 °C and 30 cm into the burrow 24,0 - 25,2 °C.

For M. velvetosoma there were similar data 25, 3 - 25,7 °C (average inside the burrow).

Based on this, you can decide if these 2 Megaphobema species are a good choice for your room.
Thanks for providing that info, although, it means I'm gonna just be focusing on carnivorous plants for now.
 

Chris LXXIX

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Last Summer here in Lombardy (Northern Italy) weather was not even near 'hot', but more, like if the doors of hell opened all of a sudden. Almost 34° C night! More than a month like that.

This combined with the pretty high humidity we have here: a bad mix.

All of my T's were near/inside their water dish, drinking like Homer would drink a beer. Watching my female 'OBT' drinking, checking, just for laughing, Kenya temperatures, Mombasa was a sort of heaven compared to my room.

Guess who's the only Theraphosidae that was fine, and that btw molted without issues? Yes, my 0.1 Megaphobema robustum.

Those T's are "eating like horses tanks on eight legs". The only essential thing they need is lots of inches of moist substrate and good ventilation.
 

Jeff23

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I have three megaphobema robustum. I bought as 1.5" near the start of Sep 2016 and they are probably around 3" now. They are constantly burrowing and all of the enclosures have more air space at the bottom than the top. They are loving lots of moisture.

I have kept all of them at 74 F for the full time.

They never cover the entrance to the burrow. They are big eaters. I almost never find uneaten prey. They are nervous and aim their butts in my direction when they detect me doing water refills. Rehousings should be limited for them.
 

Angel Minkov

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They're a notoriously difficult genus to keep and breed, aside from robustum, which fare well when kept at medium temps of around 22-26C. Keeping the others at around 22-25 would be optimal.
 

Andrea82

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They're a notoriously difficult genus to keep and breed, aside from robustum, which fare well when kept at medium temps of around 22-26C. Keeping the others at around 22-25 would be optimal.
Not to be a smart a##, but if you
can keep those species on those temps, doesn't that mean you can succesfully keep the genus around 22/24°C, essentially lifting the need for different temps for different species? Or is it stated this way to create a wider window for temps to keep these species?
 
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