Euathlus sp Red Chilean Flame Dwarf: Questions from a newbie

Turiell

Arachnopeon
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Jan 14, 2017
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Hello everyone, I'm Turiell and I'm new to the boards and to the hobby. I have a question about the Chilean Flame Dwarf tarantula. Does anyone know how long the female lives? I just ordered one and found out she's six years old right now. So I was just wondering if anyone knew how long they usually live.

For those of you that own the CFD I would appreciate hearing about them. I'm just curious to hear about other people's experience with this T. I have read that they are very docile and are just great to have as a pet. Have most of you found that to be true? Just anything that anyone wants to share would be great.

Anyway thank you all so much for your time, and I hope all is well with everyone!
 

viper69

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To my knowledge their life span isn't widely known, and maybe not known at all. They haven't been in the hobby too long, and they are not characterized by scientists completely either.

I'm assuming you are referring to E. sp. Red? Common names aren't helpful.

The females are slow growers, and generally, slow growing animals have longer life spans than those that grow quicker.

If I had to speculate how long they live, I wouldn't be surprised if they reached 20 years. I haven't owned my AF or my slings that long hah. Here's a pic of my AF.

Also, if you are looking for basic info on them, definitely search the forum, there are plenty of people talking about them over the last few years. I've posted numerous times about the benefits of E. sp. Red and E. sp. Yellow! :D

 

Andrea82

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Lovely creatures, don't get very big, can be finicky eaters. Always seem to want to go out of its enclosure when opening. The only T that walks straight on my hand without fear. Even though these are spiders and have no personality, Id describe this species as curious. Very good first tarantula!

They grow really slow, mine is still a 1,5cm sling after a year,so i don't think your female will die soon. It's probably just reaching maturity:D.
 

Ratmosphere

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Aug 23, 2015
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Might as well ask a question here instead of creating a new thread.

To my knowledge their life span isn't widely known, and maybe not known at all. They haven't been in the hobby too long, and they are not characterized by scientists completely either.

I'm assuming you are referring to E. sp. Red? Common names aren't helpful.

The females are slow growers, and generally, slow growing animals have longer life spans than those that grow quicker.

If I had to speculate how long they live, I wouldn't be surprised if they reached 20 years. I haven't owned my AF or my slings that long hah. Here's a pic of my AF.

Also, if you are looking for basic info on them, definitely search the forum, there are plenty of people talking about them over the last few years. I've posted numerous times about the benefits of E. sp. Red and E. sp. Yellow! :D

Do you know if wild caught species are as docile as captive bred species? Also, is there a chance wild caught species have mites or parasites? Or do they lose them after they molt?
 

viper69

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Might as well ask a question here instead of creating a new thread.



Do you know if wild caught species are as docile as captive bred species? Also, is there a chance wild caught species have mites or parasites? Or do they lose them after they molt?
1. They can be yes. However, the reverse is true, someone on the forum has a CBB specimen that was just like an OW. This species isn't docile because it's captive bred. All accounts I've read from the field report the same docile nature observed in CB specimens.

2. Yes
3. Not necessarily to my knowledge on parasites
 

Garth Vader

Arachnobaron
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I am also a beginner and bought an E sp red (mature female) in August. She is delightful. She's calm and curious and not very big. She's about 7 years old. I've tried to find how long they live and there just isn't much info out there. My guess is that she'll be around for quite a while.

This T has not eaten once since I adopted her. So far she has refused every type of prey I give her. I actually found this stressful for a while and now it's just a bit irritating. I'm getting another T that likes to eat so I can give it the prey she turns down. Also She is currently looking very rough- not moving much, small abdomen and a bald spot. I'm suspecting premolt.

I keep mine in an enclosure that is a bit longer than necessary so she can roam. I keep a cap full of water in there, a hide and a little plastic plant. I keep the temp around 72-75. I don't worry about humidity.

She will walk out when given the chance. This is not a T where you open the enclosure and turn your back- they will take off and probably go into your living room to watch tv. :)
 

Turiell

Arachnopeon
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Jan 14, 2017
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Thank you so much for your replies everyone! It has been most helpful! Viper69, your tarantula is beautiful! Is it a male or a female? Oh and yes, I was talking about the E sp red. Sorry for the confusion! I'm such a noob lol

Andrea82, I've read that it can take quite a while for the babies to get big. I'm getting a baby along with my female and it's 1/4 of an inch. I have never taken care of something that tiny before and I'm both excited and nervous about it. I'm so scared I'll kill it because it's so fragile! :eek:

Spidertherapy78, I've heard that these tarantulas can refuse food for a long time. I'm sorry yours hasn't eaten since you got her. I can understand how stressful that would be! I hope she starts perking up in that area after she molts. And I'll definitely have to keep an eye on my girl whenever I open her enclosure. My mom watches a lot of tv, and I don't know if she would enjoy such a surprise companion! :rofl:
 

viper69

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Thank you so much for your replies everyone! It has been most helpful! Viper69, your tarantula is beautiful! Is it a male or a female? Oh and yes, I was talking about the E sp red. Sorry for the confusion! I'm such a noob lol

Andrea82, I've read that it can take quite a while for the babies to get big. I'm getting a baby along with my female and it's 1/4 of an inch. I have never taken care of something that tiny before and I'm both excited and nervous about it. I'm so scared I'll kill it because it's so fragile! :eek:

Spidertherapy78, I've heard that these tarantulas can refuse food for a long time. I'm sorry yours hasn't eaten since you got her. I can understand how stressful that would be! I hope she starts perking up in that area after she molts. And I'll definitely have to keep an eye on my girl whenever I open her enclosure. My mom watches a lot of tv, and I don't know if she would enjoy such a surprise companion! :rofl:
I didn't specify. AF stands for adult female, and 0.1 means female.

Also, to help get people's attention use the @Turiell symbol. Some people don't read replies unless their name is done that way.
 

Andrea82

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Tiny slings can be daunting. You usually can keep it in the vial/condiment cup it is shipped in.
For water, just dribble some water down the side. Since this species is easily intimidated by live and/or size of prey, I feed pieces of mealworm or prekilled pinhead crickets.

@spidertherapy78
Her abdomen is small? Maybe not this species but T-s usually get a little bloated/fat before molting.
 

viper69

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Tiny slings can be daunting. You usually can keep it in the vial/condiment cup it is shipped in.
For water, just dribble some water down the side. Since this species is easily intimidated by live and/or size of prey, I feed pieces of mealworm or prekilled pinhead crickets.

@spidertherapy78
Her abdomen is small? Maybe not this species but T-s usually get a little bloated/fat before molting.
E sp Red does gain mass like a Brachy, before molting. Just smaller heh.
 

Turiell

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Jan 14, 2017
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Hi everyone, sorry for disappearing but life got busy and then I got my new tarantula. Oh gosh, she's such a beautiful little girl and I completely adore her! I'm so happy I got her, she's been so much fun to watch. I've seen her drink, which startled me at first but was so awesome to see, and she's eaten three meal worms since I've had her. She's also dug around her enclosure in attempt to spruce it up to her liking lol

I have a question though. Well a few actually. It seems there is condensation in the substrate and I was wondering if I should be concerned? Should I empty it and replace it with new substrate? I'm just worried that mold and bacteria will develop if I leave it. I've attached a picture so you can see what I mean. Also I would love some feedback on the set up I have her in. Is it all wrong? Please let me know if it is.

Anyway thank you all for reading this, I appreciate it. Please forgive any stupid newbie mistakes and/or dumb questions. I'm trying so hard to make sure I'm caring for her correctly. Any help would be great! Thanks again!
 

Attachments

gobey

Arachnoknight
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Jun 20, 2014
Messages
291
Hi everyone, sorry for disappearing but life got busy and then I got my new tarantula. Oh gosh, she's such a beautiful little girl and I completely adore her! I'm so happy I got her, she's been so much fun to watch. I've seen her drink, which startled me at first but was so awesome to see, and she's eaten three meal worms since I've had her. She's also dug around her enclosure in attempt to spruce it up to her liking lol

I have a question though. Well a few actually. It seems there is condensation in the substrate and I was wondering if I should be concerned? Should I empty it and replace it with new substrate? I'm just worried that mold and bacteria will develop if I leave it. I've attached a picture so you can see what I mean. Also I would love some feedback on the set up I have her in. Is it all wrong? Please let me know if it is.

Anyway thank you all for reading this, I appreciate it. Please forgive any stupid newbie mistakes and/or dumb questions. I'm trying so hard to make sure I'm caring for her correctly. Any help would be great! Thanks again!
If the substrate is damp... Maybe change it

If it's just moist and she's not fussy

Let it dry

Her enclosure is well ventilated

If you see a mold patch just dig it up and toss it

If mold grows under the top layer of substrate or in her burrow

Change the substrate
 

Trenor

Arachnoprince
Joined
Jan 28, 2016
Messages
1,899
Hi everyone, sorry for disappearing but life got busy and then I got my new tarantula. Oh gosh, she's such a beautiful little girl and I completely adore her! I'm so happy I got her, she's been so much fun to watch. I've seen her drink, which startled me at first but was so awesome to see, and she's eaten three meal worms since I've had her. She's also dug around her enclosure in attempt to spruce it up to her liking lol

I have a question though. Well a few actually. It seems there is condensation in the substrate and I was wondering if I should be concerned? Should I empty it and replace it with new substrate? I'm just worried that mold and bacteria will develop if I leave it. I've attached a picture so you can see what I mean. Also I would love some feedback on the set up I have her in. Is it all wrong? Please let me know if it is.

Anyway thank you all for reading this, I appreciate it. Please forgive any stupid newbie mistakes and/or dumb questions. I'm trying so hard to make sure I'm caring for her correctly. Any help would be great! Thanks again!
It likely just moisture from where it was in the bag. I'd just let it dry out and unless it's really wet it won't take long.

Sounds like she is doing fine. Good luck.
 

Turiell

Arachnopeon
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Jan 14, 2017
Messages
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@gobey @Trenor Thank you so much for the responses, it was very helpful! My little girl is still doing well, though I have another question. I've been feeding her meal worms and when I go to pick out any leftovers I can't ever find any. I'm assuming she eats the entire thing and there just isn't anything to find. Do tarantulas do that often? Am I assuming wrong and just not looking well enough?
 

viper69

ArachnoGod
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@gobey @Trenor Thank you so much for the responses, it was very helpful! My little girl is still doing well, though I have another question. I've been feeding her meal worms and when I go to pick out any leftovers I can't ever find any. I'm assuming she eats the entire thing and there just isn't anything to find. Do tarantulas do that often? Am I assuming wrong and just not looking well enough?
The smallest of Ts leave the smallest boli, it's there.
 

Anoplogaster

Arachnodemon
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Some Ts will hide the leftovers. I guarantee you they won't consume it entirely. There are always parts that aren't digestable.
 

Trenor

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@gobey @Trenor Thank you so much for the responses, it was very helpful! My little girl is still doing well, though I have another question. I've been feeding her meal worms and when I go to pick out any leftovers I can't ever find any. I'm assuming she eats the entire thing and there just isn't anything to find. Do tarantulas do that often? Am I assuming wrong and just not looking well enough?
You might see some white specks where it defecated but like other have said they will be very tiny. A meal worm has only a small amount of hard exo/leftovers which is mostly what boli is made from. They take the pieces that they can not eat and wrap it up in web to make boli. If you see some it'll just be very tiny ones.
 
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