Do fossorials really come out at night?

Arachne97

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 23, 2016
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I've always disliked pet holes. For me I don't like getting a pet that I wouldn't see. Its such a shame that a lot of beautiful tarantulas are pet holes though. However I heard that they like to come out late at night/early morning. I usally sleep at around 1-3am and I live in a dorm so my tarantulas share the room with me. Its a quiet room and I tend to turn off the lights while I browse on the internet/listen to music. Does this mean that I'll get to see fossorial ts considering I buy one in the future?
 

Trenor

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My pet holes have been a mixed bag. I sometimes see them regularly and then I wont see them for months. I've got really great photos of them while they are out. I see them more late at night but they have been out in the evenings as well. My two I.mira Ts haven't been out in months that I've seen. They are plumped up so I likely wont see them again until they molt and come out looking for food/water.

I have a room just for Ts that gets no traffic unless I am in it. I often slip in without turning on the light. I keep a red LED flashlight hanging on the wall by the door. I've seen a lot of my Ts out and moving about normally because of that. I'm not sure how you being in the same room all the time with your Ts will affect how often they are out. I'd imagine it will cut back on how often you'll see skittish Ts including pet holes.
 
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Nightstalker47

Arachnoking
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Jul 2, 2016
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Pet holes can be underrated. All of the species I keep come out regularly, at night, if they are hungry. If it's in pre molt then you won't see it for a while. Also you need to be discrete and careful not to spook them. A lot of the times when I go to feed them they bolt back down their burrow at the first sign of disturbance. But seeing them is awesome since you only catch a glimpse here or there. Oh and you know they're hungry when they're out!
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Yes of course. After midnight in particular. The very moment that my toy soldiers start to animate for re-invoke ancient battles, they come out for watch :troll:
 

Vezon

Arachnopeon
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Aug 26, 2015
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A good number of my fossorials and arboreals do this. There may be occasions that I won't see something for a few weeks, but that's probably because they aren't hungry. If you want to see your fossorial specimens more often, just 'underfeed' them. Obviously don't starve them, but don't feed them as much as your other stuff.
 

Stella Maris

Arachnoknight
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Jan 28, 2017
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My A. seemani sling was out for quite some time, building vast tunnel systems in his substrate. Then he got lazy and made a "cave" with one or two peek holes. He graduated to official pet hole now. I don't see him during the day at all (for now).

But when I went to bed this weekend around 1-1:30am, I found his front limbs poking out one of his peep holes. As soon as the light shined on him, he zoomed right back into his cave.

He thinks that I can't see him teehee, but I can either view him through his peep hole or lift up his container to see him underneath. It's fun watching the cricket fall into my sling's cave entrance and hearing it being immediately grabbed. Pet holes can be fun!
 

Lucashank

Arachnosquire
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Mar 8, 2017
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My E. cyanognathus is always visible, whether she is digging and throwing her dirt, sitting at the entrance of her burrow, or unknowingly being peeped by me ;)

I wrapped an old bandanna I used to use around the substrate area of the enclosure so that when she digs against the glass, the light does not bother her.



And here is when I pull it down for a sneak peek :)



And yes, she is certainly more active at night and in the morning in my experience.
 

JoshDM020

Arachnobaron
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Mar 24, 2017
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My E. cyanognathus is always visible, whether she is digging and throwing her dirt, sitting at the entrance of her burrow, or unknowingly being peeped by me ;)

I wrapped an old bandanna I used to use around the substrate area of the enclosure so that when she digs against the glass, the light does not bother her.



And here is when I pull it down for a sneak peek :)



And yes, she is certainly more active at night and in the morning in my experience.
That. Is an awesome enclosure. Where might i find a jar like that? I thunk a thought about some mason jars earlier today but then i read a person say that the curve in the glass at the top could cause some issues. That seems to not have that issue.
 

Arachne97

Arachnopeon
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Dec 23, 2016
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Thanks! Now I've got my eye on some C.fimbriatus slings since our local breeder has some. Anyone keep this species? Anything special about them?
 

Red Eunice

Arachnodemon
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Thanks! Now I've got my eye on some C.fimbriatus slings since our local breeder has some. Anyone keep this species? Anything special about them?
You'll love this species, I've 3 juveniles and an AF, heavy webbers of Chilobrachys. AF made shallow burrow as sling, then as she got bigger became terrestrial. Floor webbing is thick, 1/2", and dense silk tunnels around the enclosure perimeter. Out in the open quite often, disturb the enclosure and she'll hide quickly. Very good eater, takes all prey types, juveniles do also and keep to their burrows most of the time. Of the 3 species of Chilobrachys I have, fimbriatus is out most often in daytime. Hours after the light goes out, nearly all can be seen at the burrow opening. On rare occasions on the surface but within a body length of their burrow.
Took a photo of the AF, bolted for cover, but you can see the webbing.
Also a C. andersoni I caught on the surface.
The sp. Kaeng Krachan were in their burrows.
 

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Lucashank

Arachnosquire
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Mar 8, 2017
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That. Is an awesome enclosure. Where might i find a jar like that? I thunk a thought about some mason jars earlier today but then i read a person say that the curve in the glass at the top could cause some issues. That seems to not have that issue.
I got it at Hobby Lobby, they were having a half off sale on containers.

Never mind. Did some googling and found em. This one even has a nifty spout for draining excess moisture! ;)
I saw containers similar to that at Hobby Lobby, although the type of glass might make it difficult to observe well. And I'm not sure how much functionality that spout would have once you put substrate in lol.
 

JoshDM020

Arachnobaron
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Mar 24, 2017
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I got it at Hobby Lobby, they were having a half off sale on containers.



I saw containers similar to that at Hobby Lobby, although the type of glass might make it difficult to observe well. And I'm not sure how much functionality that spout would have once you put substrate in lol.
I will definitely be looking there. Thanks!
 

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Dec 25, 2014
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5,693
My E. cyanognathus is always visible, whether she is digging and throwing her dirt, sitting at the entrance of her burrow, or unknowingly being peeped by me ;)

I wrapped an old bandanna I used to use around the substrate area of the enclosure so that when she digs against the glass, the light does not bother her.



And here is when I pull it down for a sneak peek :)



And yes, she is certainly more active at night and in the morning in my experience.
I swear I love this. Praise the Lord! :-s
 

Tim Benzedrine

Prankster Possum
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If I ever get several fossorials, I'll refer to them as"The Edgar Winters Group"...

Yeah, I kind of doubt anybody will make sense of that. :D
 

Tim Benzedrine

Prankster Possum
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While that is accurate that isn't the answer... you are on the right track, though. Think about them and the subject of this thread.
 
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