Do fossorials really come out at night?

Chris LXXIX

ArachnoGod
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Dec 25, 2014
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Another trick that work is to pick three or four B.dubia and start to scream: "Fossoriaaaaals, come out to plaaaay"
 

Lucashank

Arachnosquire
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Mar 8, 2017
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71
@Lucashank have you had any problems with ventilation using that setup?
No problems. If it's a warmer day, the top of the cone of the lid will fog some right after a misting, but the rest stays clear. And in the case of molding, I have dwarf pillbugs and forest springtails in there. My tarantula has been great about throwing food and waste out of her tunnel, but I've been keeping an eye out for mold in there just in case.

I swear I love this. Praise the Lord! :-s
I'm not sure I understand that face lol. But the bandanna is a gift a Christian group sent to me while I was out of the U.S. :)
 

Venom1080

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Sep 24, 2015
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My E. cyanognathus is always visible, whether she is digging and throwing her dirt, sitting at the entrance of her burrow, or unknowingly being peeped by me ;)
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awesome cage. would be concerned about vent though..

OP, i see all my OBs regularly at night and even throughout the day when the lights are out for a while. except the P muticus of course... :shifty:
 

aurusantula

Arachnopeon
Joined
Mar 1, 2015
Messages
49
As someone in a dorm with a tarantula: my tarantula is definitely more active when she is actively being fed, and she'll go through visibility/hiding phases depending on the temperature. If it's colder, she'll hide in her hole more. If it's warmer, she's out in the open more. But she does tend to be actively moving and digging during the night, though. I just happen to also be nocturnal and so I'll see her doing things.
 

Arachne97

Arachnopeon
Joined
Dec 23, 2016
Messages
10
As someone in a dorm with a tarantula: my tarantula is definitely more active when she is actively being fed, and she'll go through visibility/hiding phases depending on the temperature. If it's colder, she'll hide in her hole more. If it's warmer, she's out in the open more. But she does tend to be actively moving and digging during the night, though. I just happen to also be nocturnal and so I'll see her doing things.
What species are you talking about? Well from where I live it rarely gets below 30 degrees celsius. Its usually about 32 at daytime but it may reach the mid 20s when it rains at night.
 

Arachne97

Arachnopeon
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Dec 23, 2016
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You'll love this species, I've 3 juveniles and an AF, heavy webbers of Chilobrachys. AF made shallow burrow as sling, then as she got bigger became terrestrial. Floor webbing is thick, 1/2", and dense silk tunnels around the enclosure perimeter. Out in the open quite often, disturb the enclosure and she'll hide quickly. Very good eater, takes all prey types, juveniles do also and keep to their burrows most of the time. Of the 3 species of Chilobrachys I have, fimbriatus is out most often in daytime. Hours after the light goes out, nearly all can be seen at the burrow opening. On rare occasions on the surface but within a body length of their burrow.
Took a photo of the AF, bolted for cover, but you can see the webbing.
Also a C. andersoni I caught on the surface.
The sp. Kaeng Krachan were in their burrows.
Wow thats some really thick webbing. Maybe we could say that fimbriatus isnt much of a pet hole at all? They look gorgeous though
 

Chris LXXIX

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Dec 25, 2014
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I thought you could barely understand southern Italians! Not much conversation involved? :cool:
Yeah my man, I can't understand Southern Italians when they speak using their (according to their Region/Area etc) language only, and btw viceversa North to Center/South.

But if 'we' speak to each other using standard Italian we can even into sex du-uh :)
 

aurusantula

Arachnopeon
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Mar 1, 2015
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49
What species are you talking about? Well from where I live it rarely gets below 30 degrees celsius. Its usually about 32 at daytime but it may reach the mid 20s when it rains at night.
I have an Aphomopelma chalcodes, and I live in a place where the temperature is between 0-20 Fahrenheit (-5ish Celsius) during the winter but in the 80's and 90's Fahrenheit during the summer.
 

Andrea82

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Jan 12, 2016
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I have an Aphomopelma chalcodes, and I live in a place where the temperature is between 0-20 Fahrenheit (-5ish Celsius) during the winter but in the 80's and 90's Fahrenheit during the summer.
I assume you use additional heating through winter temps? I can't see them surviving on -5°C....
 

bryverine

Arachnoangel
Joined
Apr 18, 2012
Messages
894
I see them more often at night... but still rather seldom. They're especially elusive when they're not hungry.

My M. robustum has been out every night the last week. My lividum and muticus (Queen) are rarely seen beyond feet IF I'm lucky.

I think it makes them that much more beautiful... absence makes the heart grow fonder and I'm darn fond of my queen...
 

Lucashank

Arachnosquire
Joined
Mar 8, 2017
Messages
71
Good grief... my E. cyanognathus is doing a terrible job of being a pet hole. She just went out of her way to grab and carry her water bowl (bottle cap) to her burrow and try to shove it inside.
She gave up though, and is now webbing it to the side of her hill.
I'm not looking forward to her reaction when I take it back. :banghead:

Or maybe I could keep supplying her with bottle caps so she can make a plastic fortress? :cool:
 

Andrea82

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Jan 12, 2016
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Good grief... my E. cyanognathus is doing a terrible job of being a pet hole. She just went out of her way to grab and carry her water bowl (bottle cap) to her burrow and try to shove it inside.
She gave up though, and is now webbing it to the side of her hill.
I'm not looking forward to her reaction when I take it back. :banghead:

Or maybe I could keep supplying her with bottle caps so she can make a plastic fortress? :cool:
Mine's not a pet hole either. Sits in full view every evening, except on feeding nights. Then she just snatches the food from the entrance and is gone. My E.murinus is the same.
My E.pachypus is showing her fuzzy butt and legs every night. The only one i haven't seen out for even just a little bit is my P.muticus. But that's okay, i can see her plenty since she made her burrow along the walls of her enclosure. :)
 

Matttoadman

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Joined
Aug 11, 2016
Messages
216
I have two Cyriopagopus sp. "minax" females. One never leaves its burrow. It molted two weeks ago and still is setting at the bottom. The other one comes out nightly to flip over its water dish if I fill it and leaves little "foot prints" in the substrate.
 
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