Coconut Fiber

Glory

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jan 25, 2011
Messages
18
Is there any way to speed up the drying process? I soaked some dry coconut fiber last night, but i don't want Sydney to be in the temporary tank for too long. The sun isn't really drying it very quickly. I saw somewhere that you can bake peat moss to dry it out. I was wondering if the same could be done for coconut fiber. Thanks in advance for your help.
 

paassatt

Arachnoangel
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Nov 19, 2010
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887
In my experiences, I've found that using about 1/3 less water than the instructions recommend gets the fiber sufficiently moist (unless of course you're in need of a swamp for the couple species in need of that) with a much-reduced drying time.

This is assuming you're talking about the compressed bricks of coco fiber.
 

Glory

Arachnopeon
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Jan 25, 2011
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18
Thank you. Yes, it was a compressed brick. I had a hard time finding loose coconut fiber this time, so I had to buy the compressed. I've already soaked it :( I soaked it last night and did a fair job of squeezing out the excess water, but I know G. Roseas usually prefer a dryer habitat than some others. I don't want to put anything too moist in and harm her book lungs. Worst case, I'll just have to leave it out in the sun longer and she'll have to wait.
 

shanebp

Arachnobaron
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Dec 14, 2009
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If you're desperate you can spread it out really thin to increase the surface area of the substrate so that it dries faster... or hang it out on the line:rolleyes:

P.S: Moist substrate isn't going to hurt your tarantula..
 

Mez

Arachnoknight
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Nov 17, 2010
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215
Pretty sure the OP is meaning he dosnt want to have a chile rose living at 90% humidity for a few days until it dries out, rather than it physically harming the T!
 

Londoner

Arachnoangel
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Mar 21, 2008
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Spread it thinnish on baking sheets and whack it in the oven. Give it a stir about every now and then, keeping an eye on it so it doesn't start to burn and turn black.

Works for me.
 

Glory

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Jan 25, 2011
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Pretty sure the OP is meaning he dosnt want to have a chile rose living at 90% humidity for a few days until it dries out, rather than it physically harming the T!
That is partially what I meant, yes. She has been living in an almost bone dry environment for months and i don't wanna just toss her into moist substrate. You guys are truly awesome for replying so quickly. I heard it really smells when you bake it and I don't wanna piss my mother off. I think I'll just wait another day or so and see if that makes it any less moist. Too bad it wasn't roasting outside, then it would be dry in no time :p
 

Suidakkra

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Nov 23, 2010
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Spread it thinnish on baking sheets and whack it in the oven. Give it a stir about every now and then, keeping an eye on it so it doesn't start to burn and turn black.

Works for me.
Thats how I dry mine. 250 degrees for about 40 minutes, stir it up real good, and then another 30 or so minutes, then let it sit out for about an half-hour and it will be nice and dry.

I noticed the baked coconut smell when I used 300 degree heat and didnt stir as often, regardless its not an overwhelming smell.


Edit: Oh yeah I forgot to mention, make sure you churn the edges inward. The coconut seems to dry out alot faster on the edges which could lead to it getting slightly toasted.
 
Last edited:

Londoner

Arachnoangel
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Mar 21, 2008
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I heard it really smells when you bake it and I don't wanna piss my mother off.
It does make the kitchen smell "earthy" but I quite like it in a strange way lol.

You can just put the spider in if you want, but be prepared for it to go wall crawling until the sub's dry.

Good luck.
 

Glory

Arachnopeon
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Jan 25, 2011
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You guys have sold me. I'm going to buy some disposable baking sheets tonight at work and bake it. I like the idea of killing any bacteria and such. My mom can deal with the smell ;P
 

shanebp

Arachnobaron
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Or you can buy a bag of dry peat moss thats more resistant to mold ;)
 

gmrpnk21

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Nov 1, 2010
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319
It helps to squeeze as much water out as you can before you spread it out. My pulchra isn't happy right now because it's substrate is taking forever to drt. It's sitting on it's plastic hide and waiting. I don't think damp substrate will hurt the T as it was already on damp soil when I bought it.
 

arachnophile223

Arachnoknight
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Oct 14, 2010
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224
i posted a thread like this and someone said to put it in the microwave for like 5 minutes and it worked rather well...of course you can't do it all at once, but it gets it plently dry
 

Fran

Arachnoprince
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Use less water than recommended but really hot, and it will brake down faster, hold less moisture and dry faster ;)
 

Lopez

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Use less water than recommended but really hot, and it will brake down faster, hold less moisture and dry faster ;)
Fran is right, I boil a kettle and it breaks up at an incredible rate with hardly any moisture compared to cold water.
 

Glory

Arachnopeon
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Jan 25, 2011
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Thanks a lot for everyone's suggestions. I nuked it in the oven for quite awhile and then mixed it half cooked and half moist. It came out pretty dry. I put my T's temporary tank inside the regular one so she can crawl out on her own (she bunched up all tight when i tried to move her). Now she is all sprawled out in the critter keeper even though her tank is fresh and clean! It's awfully silly, but I'm not gonna bother her. She can crawl out when she feels like it.

---------- Post added at 05:51 PM ---------- Previous post was at 05:47 PM ----------

Use less water than recommended but really hot, and it will brake down faster, hold less moisture and dry faster ;)
I did use hot water, but i used the suggested amount. Next time, I'm going to try a little harder to find loose fibers, either that or try something new completely. I also have another question. I've already seen it discussed so I don't wanna start another thread about it. My T used to spend a lot of time in the hide she has, but now she NEVER goes inside. The opening is kinda slim, but she has definitely kicked the substrate aside in the past so that she could wiggle in from different directions. I'm not really concerned about it, but if she wanted to hide, she would manage to, right?
 

Sevenrats

Arachnobaron
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Feb 4, 2006
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Go to Walmart and buy a garment storage box. They are big and shallow. Spread the fiber out in it really thin and then put a hot light over it or a reptile heater or an electric blanket under it or put it on a radiator. Anything to warm it. It will dry out in a couple of days.
 

mikebannon

Arachnopeon
Joined
Jun 14, 2010
Messages
27
you could always buy a bag of dried coco fiber. I belive zoo med sells it in bags. i have seen it before at local petstores. good luck{D
 

AgentD006las

Arach-how about..NO
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Jan 30, 2010
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590
2 Cents..

No need to spend 2X as much on the bagged stuff. {D

I use hot water from the tap. Next i take my hands and squeeze out the extra moisture. Its good for those forearms. :p Then let the rest air dry. I have since switched to peat moss and preffer it over coco. Moss holds moisture longer and molds less often in my experience. Peat also has beneficial springtails that ussually take over any leftovers and keep mites to a minimum. Coco husk is sterile and a perfect breeding ground for pests if kept too damp. :)
 
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