Chilobrachys Huahini

AlbinoDragon829

Arachnobaron
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I've looked at so many places and I can't find anything on this species. I've seen a few things on german sites, but all I get is general information. My understanding is that these are terrestrial. Are these as vicious as other Asians? Are their appetites huge? How big do they get? What other info do I need to know on them? Anything that is beyond general will be greatly appreciated.
 

petitegreeneyes

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Hi there Albinodragon,
I have one that is a good 5" and she mostly stays in her burrow. We dug her out the other night to see her and give her more dirt and change where she burrowed and she didn't once come after us. To me they are one of them that you see only once in a blue moon. She is a good eater though and I don't keep her real moist, more on the dry side with a water bowl. I have had her now for almost a year and she is well. Good luck!
 

Lasiodora

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It's a chilobrachys species, so I'm guessing it's aggressive. They get to like 6-8". I believe they are burrowers. They're nice looking spiders.
Mike
 

AlbinoDragon829

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Hmmm, I read somewhere that they are one of the few asian terrestrials... I'll have to find the source to show you. Do you know of any other asian terrestrials?
 

Code Monkey

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Originally posted by AlbinoDragon829
Hmmm, I read somewhere that they are one of the few asian terrestrials... I'll have to find the source to show you. Do you know of any other asian terrestrials?
Technically, an obligate burrower is a terrestrial T, what you are looking for is an opportunistic burrowing asian T. A lot of people, myself included, are prone to using the two terms interchangeably even though they're really not. Did the source really call them 'one of the few asian terrestrials' or did you provide that interpretation based upon the term, 'terrestrial'? (not accusing you of anything, just wondering out loud). I am by no means an expert on asian Ts, but as far as I know they are all* obligate burrowers. If there is an opportunistic burrower out there, I'd like to know for curiosity's sake.

*EDIT: the one's that aren't arboreal at any rate
 
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Haploman

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Yes They are

Yes They are 100 percent aggressive my female is a huge 8 incher and shes waiting to be a mommy which makes her even more vicious
 

Martin H.

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.

The Genus Chilobrachy is interesting, because it seems that it is just in progress to split into ground dweller and tree dweller species. Some species you'll find in the wild unter split-of pieces of bark or in tree holes. The holotype of C. huahini for example was found in about 1,5 m height.
A lot of people report that their C. huahini web a lot. But is this natural behaviour? If they would do as obvious webbings in the wild, any predator would easily find the spider! => Is a normal terestrial tank a wrong setups for them? hmmm...
I keep my specimen in tanks where others would keep Poecilotheria spp. in: a U-shaped corkbark at the back with a hole as entrance. The Spider has accepted this tree hole and is webbing behind the corkbark a lot, but almost none in front of the entrance. Only when the tank is very small, they web also in front of and the whole tank – I think then they see the whole tank as one large tree hole. During the day the entrance is closed with fine webbings (similar to Peocilotheria spp.).

all the best,
Martin

PS.: According to Volker v. Wirth all specimens he got as "C. huahani" from the pet trade where indeed C. andersoni. I wouldn't be surprised it the situation in the US is the same. Or do the US dealers have different exporters than the ones in Europe?
 

Tarantula Lover

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WOW!

great pic!!! iand the hahuni birdeater is terrestrial, and very aggresive!

James

P.S- kelly swift has one for sale
 

Martin H.

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Re: WOW!

Originally posted by Tarantula Lover

and the hahuni birdeater is terrestrial,
like I told above I keep mine in aboreal tanks (Volker gave me the hint to do this). Here is a photo of a lecture about Asian Tarantulas, Volker did. On the photo is his C. andersoni (= pet trade "C. huahini") tank. The tank is about 40 cm high, if I remember right. So the entrance of the tree hole is about 25 - 30 cm above the ground...
 

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Joy

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Originally posted by Martin H.
.

BTW, mating of Chilobrachys andersoni (was bought as C. huahini):
Now there's some sexual dimorphism! Awesome photo, Martin.

Joy
 

AlbinoDragon829

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Wow, now I'm confused.. lol. I guess I have used the term terrestrial interchangeably.. I meant to say I have heard that they are like L. Parahybana. Either they don't burrow PERIOD, or they very seldom every do burrow. Have I misunderstood?
 

Haploman

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Martin

Thanx for showing the pics, mine indeed is a C andersoni, my female came in WC as a huahini and shes gravid, my setup is a rubbermaid towel drawer from the top to bottom from end to end is all webbing, now seeing the way you have yours setup maybe I should set it up like an aboreal tank again thx martin
 

Martin H.

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Originally posted by AlbinoDragon829
:? well?
even I repeat myself: like I told above, I do keep my C. andersoni ("C. huahini") in aboreal tanks, like Poecilotheria spp.. I am sure they will survive in terrestrial tanks as well (and web a lot), but I think they show more interesting and a more 'natural' behaviour in such aboreal tanks (like on the photo above)

just my two cents (nothing personal)
Martin

www.spiderpix.com
 

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AlbinoDragon829

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Sorry about missing that part on your initial message, I was just looking to see if they were strictly arboreal or strictly "non-burrowing" terrestrial... Am I to assume that they are "semi-arboreal"?
 
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