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Centruroides Thread

Discussion in 'Scorpions' started by Ythier, Jan 27, 2005.

  1. Nazgul

    Nazgul Arachnoangel Old Timer

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    Hi,

    here´s a pic of one of my juvenile C. "nigrimanus". I examined the denticle rows of fixed and movebale finger of one specimen and the result was 8/8. Furtheron I counted pectinal teeth of 6 specimens and the result is 31 - 35 whereas the average is 32. I talked to Marc again and he told me the reason why he´s sure it´s no C. margaritatus is that the adults are having less bulbous chelae. Denticle rows of 8/8 could lead to C. margaritatus but the pectinal tooth count is little bit to high. In margaritatus it´s 24 - 31 (or so) and the average is below 32. Marc also told me that all of his adults are having at least 30 pectinal teeth, most of them more. Therefor I´m convinced that it´s not C. margaritatus but I´ve no idea which species then. I tired to use the Stahnke key but no species fit. C. nigrimanus isn´t listed in it though.

    Greetings
    Alex
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2006
  2. Christoph

    Christoph Arachnoknight Old Timer

    Hi,
    What species could this be?It was sold as Centruroides spec. "Honduras"
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  3. 423

    423 Arachnoknight Old Timer

    The only Centruroides species in Honduras seems to be C. gracilis, C. limbatus, C. margaritatus, C. nigrimanus and C. schmidti and in my opinion it resembles the one on Alex's picture on top of this page. Just a little darker though. Could be a margaritatus I guess, they seem popular in this thread :D
     
  4. fusion121

    fusion121 Arachnoking Old Timer

    UK
    It looks alot like a resonably freshly moulted C. gracilis to me. But frankly it seems that there is so much variation in Centruroides so who knows :confused:
     
  5. Nazgul

    Nazgul Arachnoangel Old Timer

    Hi,

    I agree with Oliver. Looks like a C. gracilis. But as Oliver said most Centruroides spp are almost impossible to id by pics. You should count the denticle rows on a molt. Is it an adult specimen? If so you could eliminate C. margaritatus because of the more or less slender chelae. By the way, the specimen on my pic above is definitely no C. gracilis and most likely no C. margaritatus.

    Regards
    Alex
     
  6. Christoph

    Christoph Arachnoknight Old Timer

    Hi Alex,
    I think also it's C. gracilis
    It's ~4cm
    My female have 9 denticle rows.
     
  7. Nazgul

    Nazgul Arachnoangel Old Timer

    Hi Christoph,

    on the fixed or on the movable finger?

    Regards
    Alex
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2005
  8. TheNothing

    TheNothing Arachnoprince Old Timer

    before I go throwing up more pictures of my Centruroides margaritatus, how might I be able to tell for sure?

    It was sold to me as such (C.m.) and was captive bred. I've questioned its ID before, especially when browsing through pictures of other Centruroides.

    the few pics i have can be found here
    i'm working on loading a couple HiRes versions before i get out of work...
     
  9. Christoph

    Christoph Arachnoknight Old Timer

    Hi Alex,
    On the movable finger.


     
  10. smalltime

    smalltime Arachnoknight Old Timer

    Here's another what seems to be Centruroides margaritatus scorpling Wild Capture from Costa-Rica (denticles 8) It had molted a while back so does colors are permanent: a 2-color tail light up and dark under, dark mesosoma, and fading colors on the legs...
    Sorry for the poor pic, I'll replace it later with a better one...
     
  11. Mantid Mafia

    Mantid Mafia Arachnopeon

    USA
    C.gracilis..sorry for the bad pic
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Nazgul

    Nazgul Arachnoangel Old Timer

    Hi,

    I tried again to id the "nigrimanus" using the Stahnke & Calos key. This time I had bigger molts for examination (my biocular has just 30x magnification). I came to the conclusion that the number of rows on the movable finger is not 8 but 9 as Stahnke´s definition "...[with nine rows] or seven rows plus a coalesced row and a short apical row." matches exactly. This again led me clearly to C. nigrimanus. My statement above that this species is not listed is complete nonsense. I was just too blind to find it cause I took the wrong path in the first step which led to a totally wrong direction.

    Also C. nigrimanus is the species with the highest average number of pectinal teeth in the list. This is another hint for a correct determination. I count the teeth of some more of my specimens and the average number went from 32 to 34.

    Furtheron I tried to determine the Centruroides sp. Nikos is keeping. The Stahnke key led to C. danieli which is a synonym for C. margaritatus according to Sissom & Lourenco . The number of pectinal teeth of his two specimens is 20 & 21. That´s a little bit low for C. margaritatus. In the Sissom paper the lowest number given for margaritatus females is 23. I don´t know about the variation in the number of pectinal teeth among different populations of one species. But as C. margaritatus is such a polymorphic species such large variation in the number of pectinal teeth and the size of the adults might be also possible?

    Regards
    Alex
     
  13. Nazgul

    Nazgul Arachnoangel Old Timer

    Hi Christoph,

    could be a hint that´s C. gracilis indeed. As far as I can tell by the pictures the subaculear tooth is pointing outwards and away from the base of the stinger also? I think you can be relatively sure that your species is C. gracilis.

    Regards
    Alex
     
  14. Murziukas

    Murziukas Arachnobaron Old Timer

    C. Margaritatus

    5th instar of C. Margaritatus eventhrough looks like C. Gracilis.
    8 rows of deticles on fixed and 8 on movable "fingers"
    Guarding 20 pupals with flies coming up as food.
     

    Attached Files:

  15. need a key

    hi... saludos o hola o quibo mijo or wathever .... i need a correct key to id centruroides, here in medellin (Colombia) u can fin them in your shoes.... they'r everywhere..... in all places.... y love them but i can't identify....

    buaaa so sad.... im so so sad .... jajajaja lol...

    sorry about my english...

    :confused:

    jacobo
     
  16. Nazgul

    Nazgul Arachnoangel Old Timer

    Hi,

    that´s still the only overall key for this genus:
    STAHNKE H.L. & M. CALOS (1977): A key to the species of the genus Centruroides Marx (Scorpionida: Buthidae) – Entomological News 88, 5 & 6: 111–120
    But as far as I know there are only C. gracilis and margaritatus listed for Colombia. Those species are more or less easily distinguishable.

    Male and female Centruroides cf nigrimanus

    Regards
    Alex
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2006
  17. hi... plz send me some documents about the id of this genus (centruroides... specially C gracilis and C margaritatus)... if u have some key...better....i cant get the correct info to do this job...

    the e mail is Jacoboc@gmail.com

    thanks

    jacobo
     
  18. Murziukas

    Murziukas Arachnobaron Old Timer

    Hi folks,

    as you can see from picture bellow: 2 C. Margaritatus. Male "gracilislike" morph, female bicolor morph (got her from George). Inspired after succesful "inbreeding" for gracilislike fellows I decided to try this one. Both are healthy, active, regualry eating. Both equal in size and strenght. Both margaritatus but if gave no result. Male was pretty aggressive, female was more deffensive and it doesn't look like mating. Well, it's understandable as I introduced female to male's tank but time didn't solve any problem they still misbehave. Any suggestions?

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Brandelmouche

    Brandelmouche Arachnoknight Old Timer

    HI all.

    If you have the key for C. gracilis vs C. margaritatus, please show me on this cite.

    Thanks all. :)
     
  20. Murziukas

    Murziukas Arachnobaron Old Timer

    7 rows of deticles for gracilis and 8 rows of denticles for margaritatus if I remember correctly.
     
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