Begginer Tarantula

Eleni

Arachnopeon
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Apr 30, 2017
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So, I plan on getting a tarantula, and have been reading up quite a bit on them, but I'd like some suggestions. From what I've read, the best beginners seem to be the honduran curly and chilean rose. I plan on getting one of these. I have a privately owned pet store near by that I trust, and I plan on getting it from there. They have slings there, and I would like to know what kin of caging I should use as they grow. Is there some sort of rule of thumb to follow based on their leg span or something? Should I get a sling above a certain size? Can they live primarily off of dubia roaches, with crickets and other bugs given occasionally? Also, is there one of the above species you would recommend over the other?
 

Moakmeister

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Another newbie...
Maniacal laughter.jpg
Screw the Rose Hair. Terrible choice for a first T. The B. albopilosum (curly hair) is a fantastic choice because they're cheap and adorable, but the T I got is the G. pulchripes, or the Chaco Golden Knee
Regina superworm.JPG
 

KezyGLA

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Euathlus sp. red, Grammostola pulchripes..

Or if you can find one, Thrixopelma cyaneolum is a fantastic beginner T. The best of the best.
 

Moakmeister

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Euathlus sp. red, Grammostola pulchripes..

Or if you can find one, Thrixopelma cyaneolum is a fantastic beginner T. The best of the best.
If you get the Euathlus sp. Red, get a fully grown adult. They grow EXCRUCIATINGLY slowly.
 

Eleni

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Thank you all, I've seen those listed on various articles, but not as frequently as the other two. I'd honestly rather stick to a less expensive more common species. Someday I'd like to get more variety and such, but for now I'll stick with what I can more reasonably afford.
 

leaveittoweaver

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Thank you all, I've seen those listed on various articles, but not as frequently as the other two. I'd honestly rather stick to a less expensive more common species. Someday I'd like to get more variety and such, but for now I'll stick with what I can more reasonably afford.
B.albo is your best bet then. Easy to find adult females. They are cute eating machines.
 

Socfroggy

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Jan 22, 2017
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Just don't go with a Rosie (Grammastola Rosea). They don't eat much, don't move much and can have quite the mood swings. While Euathlus Species 'Red' can be less common and more expensive, it makes a great first T due to its docile and curious nature and small size (An adult won't get bigger than 3 inches). If you prefer something a little more common I back the suggestion of a Curly Hair (Brachypelma Albopilosum). They don't get huge, are docile and their long bristles make them stand out from the other Ts. I also recommend a Texas brown tarantula (Aphonopelma Hentzi) for the same reasons. There are more good beginner species, it really just depends on what you are looking for. You're going to want to start learning the Latin names because with common names misidentifications run rampant. When I looked up a picture of E. sp. Red (Chilean Flame) on Google I got a pic of a Grammastola Rosea (Chilean Rose Hair) which myself and other members have advised against. With Latin names there are no questions about what exact spider you are referring to
 

Ellenantula

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B albo isn't the fastest of growers but compared to others they do okay -- I'd classify them more as medium growth rate.
Mine is pushing 3.5" (possibly 4") or so a couple years in -- mine has looked like a small adult instead of a baby for a while now.
Mine was freebie 2nd instar sling someone included in an order. 2+ years later, he/she is now rehoused into an adult enclosure -- thing started in a tiny 1 ounce condiment cup, before moving into a juvie enclosure and now in permanent home. Not a bad growth rate at all.
I always recommend an adult female Brachi for newbies -- but you do pay more.
Given your choices -- B albo will probably please you the most -- even if you get one as sling.
 

Jason B

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I also suggest the B. Albo over the Rosie, As others have stated rosie's don't eat much, and a fasting rosie (one who hasn't eaten in months) will make an inexperienced keeper nervous. Just skim there the threads here on the first few pages, there is almost always a thread or two about a fasting t (more often a rose hair) who hasn't eaten in months. The only positive thing about a rose hair being a first t, is you'll be looking for a second t real quick.
 

Venom1080

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rosies make fine first spiders. but there are several better options as those listed above.
 

Andrea82

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A member here, EulersK, has a video series about keeping Theraphosidae, AraneAid. This episode is about beginner species.
 

Eleni

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In all my researching of rose hairs, I haven't seen much warning at all, so I am very grateful for that information. I probably will go with a B. Albo T, I was leaning more towards that one in the first place. Since you recommend getting an adult female, I'll probably wait till the next expo, which isn't till august. Thanks again
 

cold blood

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cold blood

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In all my researching of rose hairs, I haven't seen much warning at all, so I am very grateful for that information. I probably will go with a B. Albo T, I was leaning more towards that one in the first place. Since you recommend getting an adult female, I'll probably wait till the next expo, which isn't till august. Thanks again
It would, IME, be a mistake to get a rose hair. Get a G. pulchripes, you will be happy.
 

Eleni

Arachnopeon
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Apr 30, 2017
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Right...this is the other thread...from today....started at about the same time...there are so many threads of the same content its actually alarming.

I posted a lot of good info here...I'm not writing it twice in one afternoon though:)

http://arachnoboards.com/threads/good-starter-ts.293663/#post-2620950
Thank you, I did have a look at that, it was very helpful and informative

It would, IME, be a mistake to get a rose hair. Get a G. pulchripes, you will be happy.
A G. Pulchripes, from what I've read, may be a little big, not for me, but for my parents, I'd rather get a smaller one than risking someone forcing me to get rid of it (or worse, kill it). I'll see what happens, though.
 

Moakmeister

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A G. Pulchripes, from what I've read, may be a little big, not for me, but for my parents, I'd rather get a smaller one than risking someone forcing me to get rid of it (or worse, kill it). I'll see what happens, though.
I wouldn't worry about that. The G. pulchripes grows so slowly it'll take years to get as big as your hand.
 

The Grym Reaper

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I'd honestly rather stick to a less expensive more common species.
You honestly can't go wrong with Brachypelma albopilosum:

- They're dirt cheap and easily obtainable.
- They're one of the faster growing members of the genus (I got a 2" female 11 months ago and she's well over 4" now).
- They have a good appetite.
- They're visible most of the time when bigger.
- They're fairly active.
- They're generally just good-natured, adorable little fuzzballs of death.

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