Actual Goliath bird eater size

DreadMan

Arachnopeon
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This may seem like a stupid question, but I'm rather curious. Why are there so few Theraphosa blondii in the hobby? I know suppliers that have them, institutions that keep them, why so few hobby keepers? Again, apologies if these seems stupid it just doesn't make much sense to me especially considering that we have countless CITES species (both Appendix I and II) that are all over the place...
They are aggressive AND shoot hairs. Most new world tarantulas are docile, but they shoot hairs. Old world tarantulas dont shoot hairs, but are very aggressive. Birdeaters combine both these abilities, making it quite a hard animal to keep.
 

goliathusdavid

Arachnobaron
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They are aggressive AND shoot hairs. Most new world tarantulas are docile, but they shoot hairs. Old world tarantulas dont shoot hairs, but are very aggressive. Birdeaters combine both these abilities, making it quite a hard animal to keep.
Fair. I don't think it would stop me or many others though :rofl:
 

Comatose

Arachnobaron
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This happens to be the largest tarantula I’ve ever seen in person. I have never seen a living spider I would believe is over 11”, and 95% of the 10 inchers you hear about end up being well under that. This particular female is very old but doing well; I’ll take precise measurements when she molts or dies. We did our best with those pictures but she wants super cooperative.

The only living spider I’ve ever seen a picture of that was plausibly over 11” (perhaps even 12”) was a male Theraphosa apophysis owned by Mark Hart of West Coast Zoological in Florida in the mid 90’s.


This may seem like a stupid question, but I'm rather curious. Why are there so few Theraphosa blondii in the hobby? I know suppliers that have them, institutions that keep them, why so few hobby keepers? Again, apologies if these seems stupid it just doesn't make much sense to me especially considering that we have countless CITES species (both Appendix I and II) that are all over the place...
They haven’t been imported as WC in over a decade and they’re likely the most challenging Theraphosa to breed. They’re out there for sure; they just happen to be the most underrepresented Theraphosa species right now.
 

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Liquifin

Arachnoprince
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This may seem like a stupid question, but I'm rather curious. Why are there so few Theraphosa blondii in the hobby? I know suppliers that have them, institutions that keep them, why so few hobby keepers? Again, apologies if these seems stupid it just doesn't make much sense to me especially considering that we have countless CITES species (both Appendix I and II) that are all over the place...
Most T. blondi in the hobby currently at the moment where imported from the EU. Not sure of back then.

This happens to be the largest tarantula I’ve ever seen in person. I have never seen a living spider I would believe is over 11”, and 95% of the 10 inchers you hear about end up being well under that. This particular female is very old but doing well; I’ll take precise measurements when she molts or dies. We did our best with those pictures but she wants super cooperative.

The only living spider I’ve ever seen a picture of that was plausibly over 11” (perhaps even 12”) was a male Theraphosa apophysis owned by Mark Hart of West Coast Zoological in Florida in the mid 90’s.




They haven’t been imported as WC in over a decade and they’re likely the most challenging Theraphosa to breed. They’re out there for sure; they just happen to be the most underrepresented Theraphosa species right now.
That's a nice T. apophysis. But I still don't measure in DLS as frequently as most people.
 

Comatose

Arachnobaron
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That's a nice T. apophysis. But I still don't measure in DLS as frequently as most people.
That’s why I tried to get measurements in both directions... she didn’t cooperate either way. I also measured her carapace but didn’t get a good picture.
 

0311usmc

Arachnoknight
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They are aggressive AND shoot hairs. Most new world tarantulas are docile, but they shoot hairs. Old world tarantulas dont shoot hairs, but are very aggressive. Birdeaters combine both these abilities, making it quite a hard animal to keep.
Hahaha you make me laugh. Wow, been keeping theraphosas for over a decade now and have never seen them be aggressive or shoot hairs and they are very easy to keep.

Do you own a theraphosa yourself??????
 

DreadMan

Arachnopeon
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Hahaha you make me laugh. Wow, been keeping theraphosas for over a decade now and have never seen them be aggressive or shoot hairs and they are very easy to keep.

Do you own a theraphosa yourself??????
No i haven't. I just take what I read about. I have seen people say they are aggressive and hard to keep. Im not the MOST informed about tarantulas. I mostly am a insect/scorpion guy.
 

Matts inverts

Arachnobaron
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This may seem like a stupid question, but I'm rather curious. Why are there so few Theraphosa blondii in the hobby? I know suppliers that have them, institutions that keep them, why so few hobby keepers? Again, apologies if these seems stupid it just doesn't make much sense to me especially considering that we have countless CITES species (both Appendix I and II) that are all over the place...
There is a shop in Modesto California that you will find a shelf dedicated to T. blondii. They are mostly wild caught though. The real question is why you can only buy adults
 

Postmalone35

Arachnosquire
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This is kinda a dumb question, but what is the actual size of a golith birdeater? I see people say that they grow up to 11-12 inches, but the ones I see only grow up to 5 inches, even on the internet. Also, does anyone keep a 11 inch birdeater? I think that would be pretty cool to keep a giant like that :)
12 inches is on the very large side.
 

mack1855

Arachnolord
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. Why are there so few Theraphosa blondii in the hobby?
They appeal to a very select group of keepers.They are not hard to maintain nor are they aggressive,whatever that's suppose to mean.
The urticating hair is no joke.They get big!.And fangs are impressive.And,if you get bit,even more impressive:bigtears:.
And they need lots of food.Big food.And they are not slow,when pissed off.
 

0311usmc

Arachnoknight
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No i haven't. I just take what I read about. I have seen people say they are aggressive and hard to keep. Im not the MOST informed about tarantulas. I mostly am a insect/scorpion guy.
Iol. They are neither. Better stick with what you know (experience) rather than what you read about. I read about space doesn't mean I'm an astronaut.
 

Jess S

Arachnobaron
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Theraphosa spp can kick hairs though, and when they do, those hairs are seriously nasty.
When my little T stirmi was in the last premoult, it kicked hairs galore at me when I had to lift the lid to do essential maintenance. Gloves (and a mask/eye protection to be honest) is a very good idea imo to try to avoid being badly haired.

I find my stirmi's temperament to be very like my L. parahybana. Defensive, bonkers, highly food orientated. My LP will pounce on the side of the enclosure making a racket with its tarsal claws,when it detects the slightest movement outside. The stirmi isn't quite as nuts but definitely in the same category.
 
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