Wow!!!...!!!

Tarantula Lover

Psalmopoeus Lover
Old Timer
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Jul 21, 2002
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1,373
I went to check my T's today, i gave my psalmopoeus cambridgei which is only a 3/4" sling a cricket bigger then itself with all his hindlegs;P , i was only supposed to feed him dead prey, but i guess this is an accident! So I open up his cage to find lots and lots of webbing and him on the side with the large cricket in its fangs! Man they are tough little buggers! I will post a pic later on! Great hunters! They stay by the side, wait for the cricket to walk in their lair and pounce right on them! I have a question, are Psalmopoeus old world arboreals, or new world arboreals? Thanks,

James

P.S- Share your expeiriences with this genus! gotta love 'em:}
 

Tangled WWWeb

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 4, 2002
Messages
706
They are native to the New World, but are similar to " Old Worlders" in many respects.

John
 
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dennis

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 2, 2003
Messages
770
Mine just sits in the corner, totally webbed himself up, threw some dirt in its web to get totally out of sight, and I guess he is just waiting for a cricket to walk in its 'lair' :)

Dennis
 

Nixy

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 6, 2003
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1,488
Slinky. The twins P. cambridgei seems content not to web :rolleyes: But I guess being able to See her is a nice fair trade for her seeming desire not to do any building.

When we first got her she stuck to the glass, but has made several trips across the substrat. Usualy just a stroll around. Her favorite thing is her poplar branch now. I cut it out of one of my trees. Boiled it then baked it dry before putting it in to see it was clean and sterile.
She walks up and down it and round and round it all day then stretched out at the split point and just rather flops and lounges.

She Used to chase down her crickets but now when ones goes in she sits herself smack in the middle of the branch and just waits. It doesn't take long for a cricket to scoot around the edges of the enclosier then head up the branch. They usualy walk Right up to her, Where she nails them. Once in a while she chases them down the branch but they never make it to the substrate again unless they fall. But she's a breath behind them and is so fast it almost seems like she catched them midair before they hit the substrat.

Faith who Loves aboreals calls her, her Vroom Vroom baby. Because of my habit of calling her a chevy.
When her daddy asks what she is Faith pipes up. "She's a chevy daddy. You know. Just like the car. She my little Vroom Vroom baby."
Faith will sit and watch the whole time she's cricket hunting. Be it fove minuts or an hour she sits and watches till Slinky gets her crick. She makes car driving sounds while watching her trundle around her enclosier and squealing break sounds when she goes around a corner. The grabbing of the cricket comes with the squealing of breaks and a crash sound.
I really like taking pictures of Slinky. Different lights and different angles play on her. So in one picture she looks ghostly white. In another she looks tanish fawn colored and all kinds of variations between. But Personaly I think the P.cambridgei are HIghly underrated in the hobby. They are Sleek and lovely and to me a definate show off T. No one that has seen Slinky hasn't let out a gasp and said how Gorgeous she is. It's not that she's colorful. She's just So gracefuly streamline and well formed.

But anyway.
Here's Faith's favorite picture of Slinky.
She calls it the Peeky boo pic.
 

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Tarantula Lover

Psalmopoeus Lover
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 21, 2002
Messages
1,373
hey Nixy,

Awsome "chevy" you got their! I have 3 myself! I like that pic, how big is yours? male or female? My chevy hunts as well thats what makes feeding time exhilerating! Good Luck!

James
 

dennis

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 2, 2003
Messages
770
Nixy, I think you should be glad yours doesn't web much...
I can't get a good photo of mine, it just keeps sitting behind its log, totally webbed up. But I still think it's a cool T :)


Dennis
 
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