Wolf spider?

galeogirl

Arachnoprince
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I need some help identifying a spiderling that a friend brought to me last night. Colloquially, they're called wolf or hobo spiders around here (Oregon and Washington), but I'm not sure that they're a true wolf spider. The adults have a 2-3 inch legspan, and tend to vary in color from grey to brown. The spiderlings are prettier, with some knee banding and a large cream-colored stripe on the cephalothorax. Fangs are very prominent in both adults and juveniles, they always look oversized for the body length. The spiders are very leggy and fast, highly aggressive, and the bite is quite painful. You tend to find them on woodpiles, in basements, attics, or toolsheds.

I'll try to get pictures of it to post here.

Now, the decision, do I keep it or let it go?
 

Wade

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The latin name for the hobo spider is Tegenaria agrestis (thank you AAS Common Names Of Arachnids!). I beleive this spider was introduced from Europe, and has gradually spred from east to west throught the US, supposedly via the railroad system, hence the name "hobo" spider. I don't think they're related to wolf spiders, at least not closely. Many believe that this species is dangerously venomous, but apparently the facts don't support this view.

It might make an intersting captive. I say why not?

Wade
 

GQ.

Arachnodemon
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Their bites can be serious. Check out this excellent website. It is very interesting with plenty of references listed.

http://www.hobospider.org/

See the section on Hobo Spider Poisoning (Tegenarism).
 
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galeogirl

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It certainly looks like my new acquisition is a hobo spider, that fang structure is unmistakable.

He's been eating flour moth larvae pretty voraciously, I'm trying to figure out how to set him up so he'll be happy (and my fingers will remain intact--he's so aggressive!). For now he's on the spiderling shelf and getting the same care as my intermediate species get.
 

Henry Kane

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Does anyone know if they ever found Darwin Vest? Very mysterious. :?

Oh, be careful Galeo, that bite sounds kinda nasty. Later.


Atrax
 

galeogirl

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I'm always cautious with potentially dangerous creatures, even more so now. The T. agrestis will be going into a small pet pal next week when I move my T. blondi into larger accomodations.
 

Arachniphile

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I am also from Oregon, and I have collected numerous native spiders just cause I can't control myself :) Identification of the Hobo is really rather difficult to be honest. There are many members of the Tegenaria genus in the Pacific North West that are easily mis-identified (and usually are) as the T. agrestis. The most common mistake is the T. atrica which is a larger member of the funnel weavers. I have scoured the internet for clear and accurate photos of the Hobo Spider and have yet to find one of a specimine that isn't dead, too small to see, or just of poor quality. I have even found sites on Hobo Spiders displaying photos of the T. atrica!!

This link here provides some of the best pictures of the Agelenidae Family (Funnel Weavers or Grass Spiders) that I have found. They are European varieties, but you can't have everything... :) http://www.xs4all.nl/~ednieuw/Spiders/Agelenidae/Agelenidae.htm

If you have a pic of the little monster galeogirl please post it and I'll do my best to help you.
 
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