Which One Of These Substrates is Good For My G.Roseas?

Alireza

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 4, 2010
Messages
86
Hi All!
Our local pet shop has brought these substrates.I wanna buy one of them for my G.Roseas.Which one is the best?
1
2
3
4

Thanks!
 

shanebp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 14, 2009
Messages
353
I use a mix of vermiculite and peat. What I do is make a layer of vermiculite on the bottom of the enclosure and cover the rest in a thicker layer of peat. it looks cool, and it works!
 

Alireza

Arachnosquire
Joined
Sep 4, 2010
Messages
86
Hmmm,why sand is not a good substrate?
I know somewhere that sells cocco moss and peat moss.But I dont know anywhere that sells vermiculite! Is it ok to use cocco moss?
 

RoachGirlRen

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Jul 8, 2007
Messages
994
Most sands sold at pet stores are calcium carbonate sands. They clump to wetness - which can include your tarantula's mouth, vent, or freshly shed exoskeleton. Even if the sands you posted are not these types of sands, pure sand is generally considered a poor choice for T's because it is abrasive, holds burrows poorly when used alone, holds humidity poorly, and doesn't particularly mimic the substrate of most T's natural habitats (the latter being considered least important). I think most of these issues are less of a problem with G. rosea since they do not like high humidity and rarely burrow but overall the general consensus is that peat, coconut fiber, organic soils, etc. are preferred for tarantulas. If you choose to use sand in any capacity, I would at least a) make sure it is NOT calcium carbonate and b) mix it at least 50/50 with soil. But really, there's no particular point to using it when other substrates have proven superior.
 

shanebp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 14, 2009
Messages
353
Hmmm,why sand is not a good substrate?
I know somewhere that sells cocco moss and peat moss.But I dont know anywhere that sells vermiculite! Is it ok to use cocco moss?
Check the gardening section in any of your local stores. I bought mine from wal-mart, but I saw it at Canadian Tire too.
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
Check the gardening section in any of your local stores. I bought mine from wal-mart, but I saw it at Canadian Tire too.
The OP is in Iran..... ;)

I don't know what coco moss is, but I am guessing you mean coco fiber and that is just fine for a substrate. Peat moss is as well. I wouldn't use vermiculite personally. Sand is not a suitable substrate though and that seems to be what all 4 of those choices are,
 

shanebp

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 14, 2009
Messages
353
Haha wow, I honestly didn't notice he was in Iran. That could make things somewhat... difficult :p
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
Haha wow, I honestly didn't notice he was in Iran. That could make things somewhat... difficult :p
Don't worry, I have done the same thing and more than once. :eek: Hence the fact I noted where he was from!
 

dannyboypede

Arachnosquire
Joined
Aug 22, 2010
Messages
142
Most sands sold at pet stores are calcium carbonate sands. They clump to wetness - which can include your tarantula's mouth, vent, or freshly shed exoskeleton. Even if the sands you posted are not these types of sands, pure sand is generally considered a poor choice for T's because it is abrasive, holds burrows poorly when used alone, holds humidity poorly, and doesn't particularly mimic the substrate of most T's natural habitats (the latter being considered least important). I think most of these issues are less of a problem with G. rosea since they do not like high humidity and rarely burrow but overall the general consensus is that peat, coconut fiber, organic soils, etc. are preferred for tarantulas. If you choose to use sand in any capacity, I would at least a) make sure it is NOT calcium carbonate and b) mix it at least 50/50 with soil. But really, there's no particular point to using it when other substrates have proven superior.
I definitely agree. Most of the major issues with sand don't really apply to G. rosea. Still, it is more convenient to not have to worry, and always have the same substrate for all of your enclosures. It is better to use what can and can't hold humidity, as apposed to something that just can't. You want versatility in your substrate;)!!

--Dan
 

curiousme

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 11, 2008
Messages
1,659
Well, thank you all guys! I'm greatful that I posted this topic before going and buying a substrate.
Are these tanks OK,By the way? :D they've got them at the largest size.
http://www.trixiepet.com/trE/a/newL...4&firstp=&aid=61749&kattree=399-1444&pkat=399
Yes, but take the handle off so you don't try and carry the enclosure by it. Handle failure could equal a dropped T, which could equal an injured/ dead T; but you take away that possibility by eliminating the handle. ;)
 

Arborealis

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 5, 2007
Messages
222
The two best substrates I've found are Eco-Earth or Bed-A-Beast which are both cocoa fiber substrates. Both of these can be found in the loose forms in the bag or you can buy them in dehydrated, compacted bricks (more substrate for you money this way). Both of these can be easily obtained online. ^_^
Also as far as containers go, since floor space is more important for terrestrial tarantulas, I like to use the round Herp Haven habitats :http://www.petmountain.com/product/reptile-terrariums/11442-107670/lees-herphaven.html
or the rectangular "Reptile Ranch" habitats http://www.petmountain.com/product/reptile-terrariums/11442-504978/lees-reptile-ranch.html.
The glass rectangular screen top cages(with more LxW than height) also make wonderful homes. They are a bit on the expensive side but they are nicer to look at :).
 
Last edited:

jebbewocky

Arachnoangel
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 1, 2009
Messages
910
Yes, but take the handle off so you don't try and carry the enclosure by it. Handle failure could equal a dropped T, which could equal an injured/ dead T; but you take away that possibility by eliminating the handle. ;)
Basically, I agree with the above--It'll work, but definently remove the handle so you aren't tempted to tote it. However, IMO, the lids of these types of enclosures aren't that great. I really prefer screw lids, these types of lids I really have to fight with sometiemes. It's up to your personal preference.
The size is perfectly fine, and the materials are also find.

The two best substrates I've found are Eco-Earth or Bed-A-Beast which are both cocoa fiber substrates. Both of these can be found in the loose forms in the bag or you can buy them in dehydrated, compacted bricks (more substrate for you money this way). Both of these can be easily obtained online. ^_^
Also as far as containers go, since floor space is more important for terrestrial tarantulas, I like to use the round Herp Haven habitats :http://www.petmountain.com/product/reptile-terrariums/11442-107670/lees-herphaven.html
or the rectangular "Reptile Ranch" habitats http://www.petmountain.com/product/reptile-terrariums/11442-504978/lees-reptile-ranch.html.
The glass rectangular screen top cages(with more LxW than height) also make wonderful homes. They are a bit on the expensive side but they are nicer to look at :).
Both easily available in the US. OP is in Iran.
 
Top