Where do the legs go?

Dr Acula

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
336
When a tarantula loses a leg or pedipalp, the next molt that follows, they regenerate a new limb. My question is, when that leg is growing, how does it fit inside of the tarantula? I'm also curious of how the new exoskeleton develops underneath the old one? Thank you very much :D
 

bobusboy

Arachnoknight
Joined
Jul 31, 2010
Messages
287
I'll be watching this thread;

But I think that it is soft when inside the hardened exo-skeleton so it stays compressed and then when the spider sheds the exuvia (that is the right word for a shed exo right?) it kind of expands because of the internal pressure?
 

Rue

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
239
I'm not sure if the new leg is just tucked in the space where the old leg was...or if there's a particularly rapid growth of the regenerating tissue during the moult (or both)...

But the new exoskeleton develops just underneath the old one...and is very soft and pliable.

It always takes a while for a new exoskeleton to fully expand and harden.

No doubt things get pretty 'tight' within a spider or insect just before a moult...:D
 

jonnyquong

Arachnosquire
Old Timer
Joined
Oct 20, 2008
Messages
138
The new leg is essentially formed folded up, ready to expand after escaping the confines of the old exoskeleton. Kind of like inflating a rubber glove inside a tennis ball<exoskelton> with the fingers<forming leg> only filling with air<hemolymph> after the ball is removed.
 

Dr Acula

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
336
I'll be watching this thread;

But I think that it is soft when inside the hardened exo-skeleton so it stays compressed and then when the spider sheds the exuvia (that is the right word for a shed exo right?) it kind of expands because of the internal pressure?
I get ya. Kinda like one of those party blower things. They.re all curled up and when you put air, it expands. Get me?

I'm not sure if the new leg is just tucked in the space where the old leg was...or if there's a particularly rapid growth of the regenerating tissue during the moult (or both)...

But the new exoskeleton develops just underneath the old one...and is very soft and pliable.

It always takes a while for a new exoskeleton to fully expand and harden.

No doubt things get pretty 'tight' within a spider or insect just before a moult...:D
It would be interesting to find out how all the organs move around to make room for it cuz it has to take up some amount of space :?

That's gotta get pretty itchy in there too with all that hair crammed in there as well! I just thinks it's crazy how there's Ts that get powerfed and grow 1+". How do you fit inside a skin 1+" smaller than you? XD major props to Ts for their magic tricks

---------- Post added at 02:03 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:56 PM ----------

Here is some basic information about the molt process:
http://tarantulas.tropica.ru/en/node/611

Further information is easily found by searching :cool:
Thank you very much, that site had lots of helpful info :)
 

Rue

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 24, 2011
Messages
239
...the 'new' hair is soft too...shouldn't be itchy...

Don't forget spiders have an open circulatory system too...and no internal skeleton...more room to squish stuff in ...;)
 

Dr Acula

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
336
The new leg is essentially formed folded up, ready to expand after escaping the confines of the old exoskeleton. Kind of like inflating a rubber glove inside a tennis ball<exoskelton> with the fingers<forming leg> only filling with air<hemolymph> after the ball is removed.
That tennis ball/rubber glove metaphor made alotta sense actually XD thank you :D

...the 'new' hair is soft too...shouldn't be itchy...

Don't forget spiders have an open circulatory system too...and no internal skeleton...more room to squish stuff in ...;)
Well i knew bout the internal skeleton part but that.s awesome, y'think if you hold a flashlight underneath it, that you'd see the regenerating leg? That'd look pretty gnarly :p
 

Spidershane1

Arachnoknight
Joined
Apr 11, 2010
Messages
170
I've wondered this too, and the only possibility is that its just squished up inside the body. Also remember that when a tarantula nears a molt, what you are seeing is not the actual tarantula. The "real" tarantula is inside, and what we are seeing is essentially dead skin being animated by it.
 

Dr Acula

Arachnobaron
Joined
Dec 22, 2010
Messages
336
Also remember that when a tarantula nears a molt, what you are seeing is not the actual tarantula. The "real" tarantula is inside, and what we are seeing is essentially dead skin being animated by it.
That's pretty awesome if you think about it. It's like a full on puppeteering act xD i had an avic avic that lost a pedipalp but it lost too much body fluid :(
 

esotericman

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 15, 2004
Messages
298
Insects do the same thing when they mature with wings. Very amazing system these organisms have going for them.
 

Scolopeon

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Jan 17, 2006
Messages
206
Interesting I have always wondered exactly how this regeneration is carried out.

I just assumed that the cells can only start regenerating the limb when the new exoskeleton is soft, and only happens as the spider is exiting the exuvia.

But this explains how such a large portion could be regenerated as if by magic.
 
Top