When is a T dehydrated?

Hrothgar

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 1, 2009
Messages
6
In the middle of January my large female Nhandu chromatus freed herself and got lost. Last week she was found again - had been inside without any water or food for two months in a dry and hot climate. When put back in her home she immediately ended up in the water bowl with fangs wide, and stayed immobile there for over 12 hours. I assume she was rehydrating.

How long can T's last without any moisture? What happens to their metabolism when they dry out internally? Is this no big deal?
 

satanslilhelper

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
May 24, 2009
Messages
734
It's most definitely a BIG deal. This is one of the main causes of death for them. Usually though once they rehydrate like yours did they will seemingly go right back to normal. Mine all have at least.
 

Embers To Ashes

Arachnoknight
Joined
Feb 14, 2011
Messages
270
She probably did have some sort of moisture. Otherwise, there is a good chance she would have perished. It would not suprize me if she where "licking" droplets off of the shower or sink. However, my teacher informed me of an instance where an old science teacher at my school ordered a tarantula. Long story short, the tarantula was forgotten and stuffed (while still packaged) in a storage room for three months. When summer was over, he was remembered and survived. Tarantulas will never stop amazing me.
 

satanslilhelper

Arachnodemon
Old Timer
Joined
May 24, 2009
Messages
734
She probably did have some sort of moisture. Otherwise, there is a good chance she would have perished. It would not suprize me if she where "licking" droplets off of the shower or sink. However, my teacher informed me of an instance where an old science teacher at my school ordered a tarantula. Long story short, the tarantula was forgotten and stuffed (while still packaged) in a storage room for three months. When summer was over, he was remembered and survived. Tarantulas will never stop amazing me.
Your right. It definitely still had some internal moisture since it wasn't in a death curl. The death curl is caused by the lack of moisture. They're like hydraulic machines. Without that internal pressure from moisture they curl up and die.

By the way I'm glad you found your T!! (Hrothgar)
 

Johnny1320

Arachnopeon
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Messages
48
I definitely killed a P. irminia sling by not watering it. It had molted and died a few days later. Everything else was fine. I suspected hydration, needless to say all of our slings were face planted that day drinking. I was ignorant. :wall:
 

Hrothgar

Arachnopeon
Joined
May 1, 2009
Messages
6
I am also glad she survived - and there were no sources of moisture available - she was locked in a library!
 
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