what is a "true spider"?

corwin3180

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 10, 2007
Messages
16
This might seem like a dumb question, but I've been an arthropod enthusiast for some time now, but dont know much about arachnids. I was just wondering if someone could please define "true spider" for me? Thanks
 

galeogirl

Arachnoprince
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Aug 15, 2002
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Basically anything that falls under the classification Araneae.

Googling "true spider" will take you to a lot of cool sites, too.
 

gunslinger

Arachnobaron
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Dec 6, 2006
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In classification terms, Order Araneae includes the spiders. This order is subdivided into categories :

Mygalomorphs are one category, including Tarantulas, trap door spiders, etc and are characterized by 4 lungs and chelicerae that move up and down.

True spiders are another category and include spiders that have opposing chelicerae and (usually) just two lungs.
 

Salticidus

Arachnopeon
Joined
Apr 14, 2007
Messages
2
"True Spiders"

The word "spider" is an English word subject to various interpretations, as indicated by the previous replies (neither one of which is "wrong"). The standard international equivalent used by scientists is "araneid," applicable to all members of the order Araneae, including tarantulas or mygalomorphs. I know of no one researching these animals who makes a point of separating the Araneae into "true spiders" and "false spiders."
 

gunslinger

Arachnobaron
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Dec 6, 2006
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Im sure the question he asked was in reference to the Forums Title, True Spiders and other arachnids.

The term True Spiders in this use I think is supposed to exclude Mygalomophae.

The infraorder Araneomorphae (used to be called Labidognatha) are synonymous with "True Spiders" and I was pretty sure this was a very common usage, even outside of the US.
 

Cheshire

Arachnoking
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Jul 7, 2005
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I'm fairly certian he's not going to know what Araneae means, folks. ;)

Gunslinger had it about correct. True spiders have opposing mouthparts. That's the easiest way to tell them apart from the meglamorphs. They also have downward facing spinerettes, and completely differently shaped spinerettes than the tarantulas, trapdoor spiders, etc.
 
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