What do you think - O. glabifrons?

invertepet

Arachnolord
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Oct 4, 2002
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Got these today as O. wahlbergi, but they look more like glabifrons to me. Comments?

bill
 

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skinheaddave

SkorpionSkin
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I'd say you are probably right. It definitely isn't O.wahlbergi.

Cheers,
Dave
 

atavuss

Arachnoprince
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Bill, do they stridulate or hiss when provoked?
Ed
 

Kugellager

ArachnoJester
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It looks alot like my O.sp did. (Thought mine was an O.boehmi)They are difficult to ID but I also agree that it is not an O wahlbergi.

John
];')
 

XOskeletonRED

Arachnodemon
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aight,

Check out the pics at Jan's site (the scorpion files). Opistophthalmus longicauda is the closest in appearance. Appearance isn't everything though as explained here. When identifying a scorpion through a photograph using only the color variations and all markings, size as adult, length of segments, hairs, etc., which may be seen using that method, it is virtually impossible due to the different light which may have been used during photography. I have the same scorpion species, but have yet to work into the full taxonomy of this scorpion in particular. I have been housing them as O. longicauda, myself. And yes, they hiss. They are NOT glabifrons or boehmi and fought ferociously when placed together (just a test I ran for species agreement with males and females). Coloration, though difficult for many people to use, is a very easy method for a guestimate, as well as markings, etc., to get a very good idea of which species it is. Note... boehmi's lighter pedipalps over the rest of the scorpion's coloration in Jeff Dawson's pic. Yes, subspecies varies, but look at every item on the scorpion's color in retrospect to other areas and then compare. Check out Jeff's pic also of glabifrons... note the lighter definitive lines between the segments across the entire tergite. They are thicker in the glabifrons sp. Not to mention, the coloration of the tergite and cauda in comparison to the rest of the scorpion. Yes, these are noticeable traits on all glabifrons. At least, every one of them which were proven to be of the species. I like Jeff's pics because he uses very good, and normal florescent lighting (as it appears), as lighting for his photos. Though some others may have some excellent photos, they tend to "play" too much with the lighting, in my opinion, which removes the likeness of the true scorpion, making it very difficult to identify them with any accuracy by using a photo. Yes, it seems impossible, but my scorps seem to be thriving quite well. I just need to find some males of this species, which nobody seems to stock. And just because they say one species doesn't hiss, doesn't mean jack. The fact is that many of the species which may have been studied, were probably not studied for long periods of time, such as the imperator. Not to mention, kept in captivity for observation and aggrivated to see if it would hiss, as well as being watched when encountered by another predatory animal, etc. Different reactions to different surroundings is only natural for anything in this world.


later,
edw.
 
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invertepet

Arachnolord
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Oct 4, 2002
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I can't get into Jan's site. If the morphology jibes with what you're saying as best I can tell, I'll reclassify it thusly -- I am also expecting a visit from David Gaban this month and I suspect he can also help sort it out.

bill
 

XOskeletonRED

Arachnodemon
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Good deal. The ones I purchased were for a cost of 5 bucks each and there is some slight damage to the scorps, but nothing that would hinder their performance or health. You shoud have something in good enough condition for him to identify correctly, I'm sure. I can tell you that I have the other species I named and they are not at all alike in color or size with the species in discussion, other than the hissing ability. The larger or the two I have is much larger than my adult glabifrons. The boehmi is very different in all aspects of coloration and temperment. My scorps of those two species are literally identical to the pics posted by Jeff Dawson on Jan's site. I have sited no variations between his and mine on those two. I am very observant of them and I use only the best photography for identification. Speaking of which, the photo of the unnamed is quite nice. My compliments.

Later,
edw.
 
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