Waterdish...

nocturnalpulsem

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I know there's prolly been hundreds of debates on this, but I have to ask. Do I need to keep a waterdish in the tank if I keep the humidity up by other means? Unlike my redknee, who I've seen on many occasions drinking from the dish, my stripeknee just likes to stand in it, kick dirt into it, etc.

I keep a damp towel on part of the lid to keep the humidity at 80% most of the time. I'll wait till it dries out and dampen it again. This method has been working quite well, so I wondered if the dish was still recomended?

N.
 

DiStUrBeD-OnE

Arachnoknight
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Always keep a water dish in with the tarantulas.. you might not see em, but i bet they all drink if they have one.

Ian
 

invadermike

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there have also been debates on if humidy helps a tarantula molt or not, or if it's how much water the consume, I think both would just safe proof those accusations. I do see my tarantulas drink from their water dishes, my one T i had for over a year, i just saw drink out of his water dish a week ago for the first time, so they usually do it, when your not around. If i were you, i would just keep humidity up and keep the water dish full, Maybe your T will eat a bad tasting cricket and want to wash it down with some nice water... Well good luck with everything.
-Mike
 

nocturnalpulsem

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I'm pretty sure she doesn't drink it. Unless she has a water filtration system I don't know about. Her bowl is **always** full of dirt. I've never seen the water stay clean for more than a day. All she does is walk through it.

N.
 

SpiderTwin

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I have a water dish for all my terestrials and my pokie. I have never put in a water dish in with any of my Avic's, I keep the soil moist for humidity and spray the sides of the container 2-3 times a week. They seem to be doing just fine, they are nice and plump and healthy looking.
 

skadiwolf

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i keep a water dish with my Ts that are 3" or larger (none are...grin) i see them drink so i know they use it. however, i must add that it is RARE and WONDERFUL to see them drink.

however, since i have, i keep it filled just in case.
 

MrT

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Originally posted by nocturnalpulsem
I'm pretty sure she doesn't drink it. Unless she has a water filtration system I don't know about. Her bowl is **always** full of dirt. I've never seen the water stay clean for more than a day. All she does is walk through it.

N.
T's do have filters in their mouth parts to sift out impurities.
This is how they can drink out of mud puddles in the wild, and keep out cricket and bug parts when they slurp down the bug juice.

Ern
 

Buspirone

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Try changing the water dish itself and the location. My A. seemani used to fill its water dish all the time. I changed dishes and moved the dish to a new spot and it stopped....I don't know why.
 

Vys

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Out of curiosity: why would you like to not have a waterdish in the enclosure? Because it looks ugly, filled with dirt and things? I'm not trying to sound condenscending, because I would actually understand that reason, however I see waterdishes as far too logical to pass up on.
 

conipto

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Originally posted by MrT
T's do have filters in their mouth parts to sift out impurities.
This is how they can drink out of mud puddles in the wild, and keep out cricket and bug parts when they slurp down the bug juice.

Ern
Along this line, I read in 'Biology of spiders' that you can feed a spider india ink, and it will filter the water out, and leave a crusty pile of ink granules on it's palette until it's shaken or knocked off with the palps.

Neet eh?

Bill
 

Static_69

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Bill, that's pretty sweet.
It'd be awesome if humans could do that.



Risto
 

Code Monkey

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I think you've got things backwards.

Worry about water, forget about humidity.

If I've got a T that routinely fills its bowl it may go a week or two between waterings until I get around to cleaning it out but, the point is that the T gets access to fresh water often enough for it to drink if it wants to.

Humidity? What exactly does humidity do for a T? If you can answer that one accurately you'll be a god amongst T husbandry methods.
 

conipto

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Originally posted by Code Monkey

Humidity? What exactly does humidity do for a T? If you can answer that one accurately you'll be a god amongst T husbandry methods.
Humidity makes a T Humid. Duh.

Bill
 

Code Monkey

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Originally posted by conipto
Humidity makes a T Humid. Duh.

Bill
Sorry, Bill. Didn't your teachers cover the 'read the question twice' before answering?

You have stated what humidity does to a T, not what it does for a T ;P
 

conipto

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I stand corrected -

Humidity allows a T to be Humid :)

Bill
 

minax

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uummmmm?

Humidity helps the tropical species, like Haplopelma for instance, maintain their fluid balance, where in a very dry environment, they would have to consume alot of water to maintain safe levels, as dehydration would be a problem in very low humidity, for these spiders, even with a water dish. That being said, I think many T's can be kept great under less humid conditions than most think. But as previously stated, the Haplopelma is known to live in native conditions of humidity approaching 100%, So dehydration is a very real threat to these T's, if kept in low humidity conditions. It has been proven they do not maintain water levels well in low humidity.
 

Code Monkey

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OTOH, Minax, Haplopelma are obligate burrowers. I hear what you're saying about some of these moisture dependent tropicals and their internal hydration regulation issues, but I hope you realize that the measurable humidity in their tank versus their burrow humidity are two, nearly unrelated things. You can have a 30% RH in your T room, keep the substrate slightly moist, and that T has all the humidity it will ever want.

Obligate burrowers are obligate for a reason. When talking Ts that spend a fair amount of time above ground, humidity needs are pretty much nil assuming regular availability of drinking water.
 

nocturnalpulsem

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On the topic of burrowing, the T in question is my A. seemanni, who spends little, if any, time above ground. And then she's usually sitting by the heating pad trying to keep warm. Anyone in the Chicago area can attest to the stupid weather we're having for "summer."

Right, Bill? ;)
 
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