visually sexed?

Gillian

Arachnoblessed
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Hi all,
I have some questions. (About terrestrials) Is there a way, not 100%, to tell that you have male or female? I say this, because some of my t's (the unsexed ones) show the following (all ages):
* really leggy, with a almost teardrop shaped abdomen.
* sort of "stubbyish" legs, and a rounder abdomen.

Could the first possibly be males? And the second females? I know, this isn't a truly 100% method. I seem to remember that my blondi, when he was a baby, looked like a thoroughbred; all legs. And he was sexed as male.

Just wondering...

Peace,
Gillian
 

conipto

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I know for a fact that shape of abdomen differs with species, and I believe it is one thing used to classify genus. As for legs, the same goes. However, some say that leggyness and abdomen shape/size can determine sex of some T's, but I'd be skeptical about sexing with this method in general. The best way is obviously examining exuviae, but failing that, many terrestrials have a noticeable bulge between the forward book lungs where the epigastric furrow is on females, and while this is easier to feel, some species you can see it visually. Also, I've been told by John (LaRiz) that Some species have a split open furrow, with a visible lip (most noticeable on Poecilotheria due to contrasting colors) that can be seen by the naked eye.

Bill
 

Gillian

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Bill,
Cool..thanks..Hopefully, I can still hold out hope...Btw, I can just see me with my Kaja (blondi), as I try to feel for the epigastic furrow. C'mere to mommy baby...(as the hair goes straight to my face) But seriously, he ranks right up there as my favorite. He doesn't bolt or, spaz. He just stands there. And when he does decide to head for his half log, he either goes in reverse, or walks away slowly. He knows he's a bad s.o.b. :)

Peace,
Gillian
 

Arachniphile

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I can't find the thread, but Code Monkey posted some DAMN informative pics ... "Madden Style" .... lol
 

Code Monkey

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Gillian: Here's the thread with a bunch of photos to help you out on the only definitive visual aspect of sexing.

That said, within species, or even genera, there are some other characters that you can use as indicators. With Brachypelma the chelicerae size and leg/ceph ratio is visible when they're as small as 2 inches. With larger Brachypelma and even Aphonopelma (which share the chelicerae trait) it's usually possible just to look at a large specimen and say with 85+% certainly whether it's male/female.

Still, the only two definitive ways to sex an immature specimen is by examining the epigastric furrow region, either internally with a shed exuvia for spermathecae, or externally for the differences which the above thread should hopefully clue you in on.
 

Gillian

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CM,
Thanks. I bookmarked that. What I have tarantula wise are Brachys and Grammastolas, and a few others. The Brachys and the Grammostolas are the ones I noticed this difference in.

Peace,
Gillian
 
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