Using wild barks/mosses in an enclosure?

driver

Arachnoknight
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Jun 22, 2007
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I know I've seen people speak out against this before, but I thought I remembered reading somewhere that you could bake wild woods or something to that effect for safe use in an enclosure. I did a search and couldn't turn anything up, wrong search strings perhaps, I dunno.

Anyways, I hike quite a bit and come across all sorts of nice hard sundried roots and pieces of bark and such that would look really good in an enclosure, if simply baking them would prevent parasites and stuff, this could save me a good chunk of money, as my collection is about to grow considerably.

my other question concerns the use of wild mosses in enclosures. There's all sorts of great rock mosses that lift off easily, which are essentially the exact same moss I'd buy at 20 bucks a piece from a dealer. Is there any way I could quarantine this for a while, or "clean" this to make sure it's not carrying any type of unwanted parasite?

I know it's not really necessary and the T could care less, but I like a pretty enclosure :) Is this just taking too much of a chance?
 

_Nagash_

Arachnosquire
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Sep 22, 2005
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Hi!
I use lots of moss,stones and roots from the nature in my enclosures. I have never experienced a problem with this. I usually put things in the deep freezer 1 or 2 days before I use them, but since I live in norway, I thinks most of the beasts will survive this anyway.







Never had any problems with any of those enclosures.


Regards
Robin
 

Becky

Arachnolord
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Sep 17, 2006
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It should be ok as long as it is thoroughly washed.
If you collect some i'd say bake the wood - hot oven to remove parasites etc and leave it a few days to cool naturally and then wash with water, so u know there is nothing left on it.. With stones, wash thoroughly with water or leave to soak etc
For moss, freezing it should kill a lot, but warming it up again might allow other organisms to show. Maybe wash with hot water? Allow to dry, then i would of thought it'd be safe enough to use in any enclosure.

It'll be time consuming but a hell of a lot cheaper :D

Nice enclosures btw. I like the arboreal one best :D But in the first pic...is that substrate sand??
 

verry_sweet

Arachnobaron
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Jul 22, 2006
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Hi driver. I like my tanks to look natural so I also use mostly wild collected decor. I haven’t had any real problems yet and I do not do anything to prepare it for use. Except if I find drift food I leave it in the sun for about a week to kill off any gnat eggs.

When you are looking for wood make sure it’s good and solid no rotting pieces that can be crumbled off.

If you do happen to get some mold you take a Q-tip with salt water on it and dab it that takes care of it. Or you can also try boiling the wood in salt water to prevent that from happening in the first place.

People have to remember that tarantulas live in the wild with molds, dirt, sand (which I use frequently in my tanks) and bacteria and they have survived this long.

Nagash your enclosures are fantastic. I like how you used the cork sheets I might have to steal that idea (if that’s ok).


Just a show tank (for a presentation) hers is much bigger.

A. hentzi

A. avic

H. maculata



Steph
 

Mallard

Arachnoknight
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Apr 16, 2007
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I boil all the stones I use for several minutes.Even the ones I use for added lid security. As for wood and bark I wash thoroughly and bake at 350 to 400m for about 4 min and let cool in the oven. Why spend 8 bucks on a stick when you could spend it on an other "T"!
Jason
 

driver

Arachnoknight
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Jun 22, 2007
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299
I boil all the stones I use for several minutes.Even the ones I use for added lid security. As for wood and bark I wash thoroughly and bake at 350 to 400m for about 4 min and let cool in the oven. Why spend 8 bucks on a stick when you could spend it on an other "T"!
Jason
my thoughts exactly!
 

Brian S

ArachnoGod
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May 29, 2004
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I use wood from outside all the time in my cages and never have washed or heated them but then again I live in pristine area. If you are not sure it is clean then yes clean it
 

verry_sweet

Arachnobaron
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It’s a 5.5 gallon on its side. Those tanks come with a sliding screen top and can be found in the reptile section of most pet stores.


Steph
 

Needles666

Arachnosquire
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Jul 6, 2007
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Ah yes, I've seen those, but didn't know it was a 5 gallon, awesome, thanks! :drool:
 

wonderfvl

Arachnosquire
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Jun 20, 2005
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All of you guys set-ups are fantastic. I was wondering about the light. I know most moss needs bright light to survive. Do any of you use artificial grow lights? Or do you just keep replacing the moss?
Thanks.
 

verry_sweet

Arachnobaron
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Jul 22, 2006
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I use a plant light, which seems to be working fine. I have it on a timer from 11am to 3pm (when everyone is sleeping but my B. smithi and one of my G. roseas seem to enjoy it and come out to sit under it). But yes sometime I do replace the moss as well.


Steph
 

verry_sweet

Arachnobaron
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Jul 22, 2006
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Almost forgot the moss also needs a great deal of ventilation or it will mold.


Steph
 

Feathers

Arachnosquire
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Jun 3, 2007
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As a bonsai enthusiast, I'd say moss requires a low light level. Put it in full sun, it's dead.
 

_Nagash_

Arachnosquire
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Sep 22, 2005
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Thank you Becky :D

Nice enclosures btw. I like the arboreal one best :D But in the first pic...is that substrate sand??

No, Its natural clay mixed with a little peat. I think the humidity in that enclosure is about 80% relative humidity.


Regards
Robin
 
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