unblocked and blocked again

ballpython2

Arachnoprince
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Feb 28, 2007
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One of my gigas unblocked his hide entrance for about a week ate a few crickets then blocked the entrace again...IS this normal? I thought when they blocked it, it was until they molted into a new outfit then unblocked it until the next pre - molt?

My Nhandu vulpinus did the same exact thing now its hide is blocked up again at the entrance after eating about six or more crickets last week.
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
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Feb 13, 2006
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There is still a lot for us to learn about the climate in a burrow. Blocking a burrow I would assume would increase the humidity and maybe even the temp. So maybe she is controlling her own temps somewhat.
A burrow in the wild could be a few feet deep and at the bottem has to be cooler then at the top. Just taking a few guesses at it.
 

lunixweb

Arachnobaron
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That is common in some species, my A. chalcodes blocked its burrow for about 3 months from November to February, after unblocked the burrow ate the roache that I gave it and the next day the burrow was locked again, I haven't seen it in a long period.

Remember most of the T's live in their burrow for years and only go out when need to eat or to breed.
 

Alice

Arachnoangel
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also, many ts block the entrance to their homes when they feel stressed. i'm not implying you stressed it, but something as 'normal' as the vibration of the stereo for example always causes my p. regalis to frantically web over the entrace to her cork tube. funny, really - i just suppose they feel safer that way.
 

Hedorah99

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also, many ts block the entrance to their homes when they feel stressed. i'm not implying you stressed it, but something as 'normal' as the vibration of the stereo for example always causes my p. regalis to frantically web over the entrace to her cork tube. funny, really - i just suppose they feel safer that way.
Yea, they are basically slamming the door shut and just wanting to be left alone. They pretty much do what they want to do. I also have a lividum that closes the burrow every night. I have stayed up late a few nights recently and seen her walking about the nclosure, but she closes the tunnel again the next day.
 

kyrga

Arachnobaron
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Mar 24, 2007
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My g.rosea often blocks herself in, usually for as long as a week at a time. Freaked me out the first time she did it, becuase I though she escaped, but then her little legs came poking out of the ground :)
 

billopelma

Arachnolord
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Sep 20, 2005
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Your's may be taking a break from the outside world or may be not. My Hysterocrates has it's tunnel along the side of the enclosure so I can see it most of the time. It will sometimes block the tunnel entrance and sit just on the other side of the plug. When a prey item wanders by the T blasts out through the dirt and pounces. Seems to be a hunting strategy, though it could be simply opportunistic.

Bill
 

luna

Arachnoknight
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Nov 5, 2005
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My H. lividum does this too...I know when it has been about by if the door is "open".

I love this spider... possibly my favorite. All I see are legs at 3 in the morning.

Got to see it eat for the first time (I bought it back in January) this morning. Crickets usually go into the chamber of death and never come back so I know everything is ok but this morning I watched. I felt so voyeristic.


Yea, they are basically slamming the door shut and just wanting to be left alone. They pretty much do what they want to do. I also have a lividum that closes the burrow every night. I have stayed up late a few nights recently and seen her walking about the nclosure, but she closes the tunnel again the next day.
 

P. Novak

ArachnoGod
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Sep 12, 2005
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Nothing to worry about, Ts usually do this for several reason, the most obvious being an upcoming molt, but there are exceptions. The T could just be regulating the humidity and temperature in it's burrow. It also could just be want to be left alone, then fed, then left alone again. You have to remember that Ts live very secretive lives and know what they are doing.
 
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