Tiny white bugs with Scorplings?

Kita

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
11
Does anyone know what these tiny bugs are? I generally see them all over cricket remains when the kids don't finish a meal and I've just scooped remains and dirt to remove everything. I can see their eggs in the moist dirt as well, but a Scorpling buyer noticed them all over the baby she received. I checked the remaining that I have and see them as well. I notice they are collected in the areas that frequently touch the dirt like the feet and face from digging. I appreciate any enlightenment.



 

gromgrom

Arachnoprince
Old Timer
Joined
Nov 30, 2009
Messages
1,742
clean that dirt out!

those are mites, they killed both my B. Jacksoni when i was unable to attend to them.

it means you have the moisture thing down, but theres no good side/top/any kind of good ventilation.

and try to wash your emperor off so they dont bother it anymore. trust me, it was a nasty, sad sight seeing my b jacksoni pair eaten inside out.
 

Kita

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
11
Where did they come from? The mother didn't have them. I've seen them at the pet stores I've worked at as well, but only where there were dead crickets and those were not invert tanks.
 

groovyspider

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
257
Where did they come from? The mother didn't have them.
they i think just kinda come when conditions are right iam not sure but have you changed out substrate yet and you might wanna consider isolating the scorp from the rest of your inverts less you want them to spread like wild fire
 

Kita

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
11
The Scorplings aren't close to any of my Ts or Slings. I've got them out of the enclosure, but I have to leave for work so I set the container under one of my heat lamps to dry it out before I clean it tomorrow.

How do I clean off Scorplings? I though mites only fed on live creatures? Why are they always gathered on dead crickets?
 

Roy

Arachnosquire
Joined
Apr 8, 2010
Messages
67
They are inevitable with tropical scorpions, I never get any with my desert scorpions.

I would suggest cleaning those mites out and scooping out the substrate where they seem most prevalent. They will always be there but it's a question of getting the numbers under control so that they can't harm your scorpion. Oh and make sure uneaten remains of crickets get removed as soon as possible after feedings.
 

Kita

Arachnopeon
Joined
Feb 22, 2009
Messages
11
Ok, so why are they always on dead things if they are hazardous to Inverts? Only the eggs have gotten stuck to the Scorplings.

So don't keep the substrate as moist as I have? I clean out the rare leftovers the following night after feeding them before leaving for work. I'll start checking as soon as I get home or feed them less so there are no leftovers.
 

groovyspider

Arachnoknight
Joined
Aug 18, 2010
Messages
257
Ok, so why are they always on dead things if they are hazardous to Inverts? Only the eggs have gotten stuck to the Scorplings.

So don't keep the substrate as moist as I have? I clean out the rare leftovers the following night after feeding them before leaving for work. I'll start checking as soon as I get home or feed them less so there are no leftovers.
moist is probably fine its just not enough ventaltion say poke bout 6 more holes ya know
 

Galapoheros

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
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Jul 4, 2005
Messages
8,984
They are most likely a grain mite species. Do a search on this site for "grain mites". They haven't been found to be "parasitic" but imo, they can stress inverts out if the numbers get very high and looks like an invert can die of stress from the mites and bad conditions, esp. young inverts. They don't lay eggs on inverts, what you are probably seeing is the same grain mite species in the hypopus stage(google around). In the hypopus stage, the mites completely transform and develop a hard shell and suckers underneath, attach themselves to inverts and other animals and go dormant there until conditions are right to move around again or when food is available again. They can stay alive and attached to inverts for months, even when it's dry. That's why people get exploding mite populations again after they think they have gotten rid of them. The mites eat rotting vegetable matter and rotting invert parts. Some people call them "carrion mites", but most likely they are the grain mites. The mites often come with feeders, mealworms and crickets. The crickets and mealworms are fed the same stuff the mites where they are raised so they are a common problem in the hobby, I hate'em! Pillbugs work great as a clean up crew! Keep it clean in there and the mites will eventually starve. Sowbugs work too, a little more aggressive and I've been wondering if they might even eat the slow moving grain mites(?) I also have a Hypoaspis pred mite over here that keeps them from getting out of control.
 

dairy

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
Joined
Aug 13, 2007
Messages
295
The dormant mites attached to your scorpling can be removed manually. It takes a steady hand and a somewhat cooperative scorp. Good lighting is key, and if you need them put on your glasses or get a magnifying glass in there. I've done this with multiple scorps and multiple outbreaks of these dirty little jerks and had a lot of success removing mites and no injuries to the scorps.

Use a slightly dulled knife blade to gently scrape them away. Do this over a paper towel away from your tank and trash (or better yet burn) the towel when you're done. It may not be possible to get them all, especially around joints and the feet but the ones on the carpace, tergites and sternites can be removed. I can't stress enough the need to be to steady and gentle.

With this guy I scraped off roughly 95% of the offending mites. The remainder cleared up on their own with a slightly drier environment and meticulous cleanup after feeding. It helped a lot to move this guy to a small enclosure. IIRC I also scraped him several times over the course of a week or two.



 

rd_07

Arachnobaron
Old Timer
Joined
Dec 4, 2008
Messages
319
clean your tank
those mites can kill your pet by blocking the book lungs
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
3,479
Talking about a mites infestation :eek: Clean out the substrate immediately, bake cork pieces in the microwave, clean with water-chloride solution any waterbowls.
Scorpions in general can carry a couple of mites (which isn't a problem als long as there are only a couple of them), but sloppy cleaning of uneaten prey items increases the mite population. I also think that in some cases food items can carry mites....

you could also put the scorpion or scorpions in a deli cup with dry paper towel for a day or so. Mites will wander of the scorpion in search for moisture...mites love warm and humid environments.
 

Talkenlate04

ArachnoGod
Old Timer
Joined
Feb 13, 2006
Messages
8,662
you could also put the scorpion or scorpions in a deli cup with dry paper towel for a day or so. Mites will wander of the scorpion in search for moisture...mites love warm and humid environments.
I have actually found the opposite to work better. If you place them in a deli with a moist paper towel the mites tend to hop off and gravitate to the towel. They move to the actual animal when they are running out of food or moisture because they can cling onto the moist eyes, mouth, joints, and lungs of the animal and stay alive longer until conditions get better elsewhere for them.
 

Mperor

Arachnopeon
Joined
Aug 15, 2010
Messages
27
Though I think... it's impossible that mites appear out of nowhere, right?

It must have been introduced somehow - either trough the food, or through the scorpion itself? (As in the scorpion already had them when it was bought/caught?)

This is one of the issues that's holding me back from jumping in and getting a scorp right way. I need to figure out a way to fight off these stupid mites.

I imagine that keeping a well ventilated and dry food farm will be key to wiping them out from the food source? Or... will there ALWAYS be mites in the feeder's substrate?

It is quite challenging, since tropical scorpions actually need moisture... So if there were mites on them already, they would just... explode in numbers...?
 

Michiel

Arachnoking
Old Timer
Joined
May 22, 2006
Messages
3,479
I have actually found the opposite to work better. If you place them in a deli with a moist paper towel the mites tend to hop off and gravitate to the towel. They move to the actual animal when they are running out of food or moisture because they can cling onto the moist eyes, mouth, joints, and lungs of the animal and stay alive longer until conditions get better elsewhere for them.

Makes sense, thanks for the tip! Best way is to prevent mites by using well ventilated enclosures, keeping it clean and frequent changes of substrate.
 
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