Tiny s'ling care :)

sunnymarcie

Celestial Spider
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Feb 13, 2003
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I was thinking about getting, maybe, 6 very tiny T's:)

In the book "Tarantulas and Other Arachnids" (Marshall)
Page 87, for those who can look in their copy:)

There is a setup that I think will work out for me.
It's a box, with a hinged top. Some subatrate in the bottom
to hold the T vials upright. And there are 5 vials, 1 T in each.

I know that T respiration is slow, and they do not need
a lot of air flow because they dry out easy.

Now, the questions! For those who keep tiny babies:)

Is mold an issue?

What do you use for a source of heat, if any?


And the last one, for now:)

Should there be air holes in the outer box ? The photo does not show this, nor does it say anything else about the outer box.
 

alidpayne

Arachnoknight
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Apr 12, 2003
Messages
152
We keep slings. My first caution is be very careful with air holes. We lost a perfectly beautiful tiny little C. fasciatum because he contorted his tiny little self through an even tinier little air hole. He must have been a magician, because we really thought the air holes were too small for him to fit through. They will surprize you.

Our set ups for slings vary according to the species and the size. We only keep the very smallest ones in vials. Once they get a little bigger we move them into better homes.

Our favorite sling enclosures are the betta hex tanks. You can get them super cheap at a number of places. These are great for most of our slings, and they are crystal clear. My favorite T is a sweet little 7 legged A. Urticans sling we named Richard. He is currently webbing his betta hex condo all to pieces. We also use the double betta hex tanks for some of our slings, since they are already divided really well. We just put a rubber band around the whole thing to keep the lid on, and the little guys can't get out. They are also deep enough for a lot of substrate for the burrowers, and/or tall enough for the climbers (like Richard) to have a lot of space. (and a twig or two!)

We also found some tiny little rubbermaid tupperware containers (think one veggie serving size) that are crystal clear w/white lids. We drill air holes (tiny ones!) and they have really tight fitting lids. They aren't as good for burrowers or climbers though, because they are shallow.

Once our slings are big enough to spot pretty easily we usually dump the vial in favor of larger accomodations.
 

Lasiodora

Arachnoangel
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Oct 11, 2002
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I don't think you really need that type of set-up. I keep my slings in vials. My house is extremely dry in the winter too (I mist as needed). The vials have peat and vermiculite as substrate. It is moist and about 3 to 4" deep. The temp of the room they are in varies. Temperatures between 70 and 85 are safe. They will grow slower at lower temps. It drops down to about 60 from time to time at my house. Mold is only an issue if uneaten food items are left in there. Slings are not that difficult to raise.
Mike
 

alidpayne

Arachnoknight
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Apr 12, 2003
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I didn't actually answer your question LOL I got to carried away.

We don't use any kind of heat for our slings. We do monitor the temp, and if it gets to hot/cold we move them to a warmer/cooler location. Our temps usually stay about the same though so it isn't really an issue.

As far as mold goes, we haven't ever had a problem with it in our sling enclosures. and they are usually pretty damp and warm. We use pure peat moistened up a little, and no mold to date. I imagine if we let dead things stay in there for long we might have some mold, but we try our best to remove them immediately.
 

sunnymarcie

Celestial Spider
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I use rubbermaid containers for some of my critters:)

Our A. Avic has a large jar with a screw on top.
I also found some 2 ounce, round containers with a screw on top.
Walmart has them, they were less than a $1 US each
I have a pair of giant millies living in a plastic shoe box to.

Since you said you lost a tiny T out the air holes, what do
you use to make the holes. The 2 ounce containers I have
are pretty thick. They have to be drilled!
 

sunnymarcie

Celestial Spider
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Feb 13, 2003
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I want to use that type of set up for the safety of the T's
I have kids and the T's could easily get bumped off of the shelf.
It also keeps them together, not scattered all over the house.
If I can convince my kids, it's best for the T's to stay in the box.
They would have them in every room and I would ALWAYS be
looking for them.

Here is the type of T house I plan to use (pic), the box will be an
aquarium with a modified lid, or a home made one. Still not sure
on that part.

Ideas are welcome:)
 

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alidpayne

Arachnoknight
Old Timer
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Apr 12, 2003
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152
My husband is a tool fanatic. He has tiny little drill bits that we use with a regular drill to make air holes for the babies. I am not sure of the size of the bit, but I will ask him later and let you know.

Several of our adult spiders also call rubbermaid containers home. We use the jugs with screw on lids for both of our a. avicularia.

We also use the "shoe box" containers sometimes. 10 times less expensive and alot sturdier than a fish tank.
 

sunnymarcie

Celestial Spider
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Feb 13, 2003
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Not hard to move around either, nice and light:)

When you mist the s'lings, do you use distilled water or regular tap? Tap water has tons of things added to it, I don't even drink it!:p
 

Nixy

Arachnoprince
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Feb 6, 2003
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If you can't find a drill bit small enough to suit you.
Buy a cheap darning needle or any long needle and heat it on the stove flame.
Poke holes in the plastic that way.
Just hold it with a pair of pliers or vice grips so you don't burn your fingers.
 

sunnymarcie

Celestial Spider
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Feb 13, 2003
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Nixy, I thought of that, but will it go through this thick plastic?

My stove is electric, so I have to use a torch:)
 
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